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Certified By Gia Gemologist ?? What Is This Mean?!!


helo_fish
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Two weeks ago, i went to a store to purchase a ring for my girl friend. There was one candian diamond is f color, ideal cut, vs1, the price is $89000 but with no certificate. So I asked for a GIA certificate for the Canadian diamond I like. The sales said yes, no problem we can give you the the GIA certified gemologist xxxxxxx. Today I went to picked up the ring, I felt I got play. There was no GIA certificate, they only give me a certificate of yh gemological service. The sales told me this is certified by GIA gemologist, it's the same thing. And canadian diamond can't be graded by GIA , because GIA is a us lab and it can only grade us diamond. I felt like they tricked me, I remembered I kept asking to get a GIA certificate, they said yes, no problem we can give you the the GIA certified gemologist certificate. I thought GIa certificate is what the sales said. Now the sales said if I want get GIA certificate I have to get the us diamond, and it will be around two thousand dollars more. Please see the attachment.

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Edited by helo_fish
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Yes, you have been tricked.

 

1) GIA will grade diamonds from anywhere in the world; they have labs in the US, Botswana, Israel, Hong Kong, India, Thailand, South Africa and Japan, and they all can grade diamonds from anywhere else.

 

2) There is no such thing as a "US diamond", not least because the geology of the US, big as they are, is not suitable for mining diamonds (other than one place in Arkansas, which is not mined commercially).

 

3) GIA does not certify anyone. http://www.gia.edu/UK-EN/Copyrights-Trademarks#certificationA report written by a GIA graduate (and there are different types of GIA courses, BTW) is not the same as a GIA lab report, just like the opinion of a Yale graduate on a legal matter is not the same as that of Yale University.

 

4) A GIA report (which now suddenly is obtainable - for $2000???) for a 1 carat diamond costs about $100 plus shipping. You can find the GIA price list here: http://www.gia.edu/UK-EN/gem-lab-service/diamond-grading(click on "Fee Schedule" then choose "Diamond")

 

5) I won't get into the details of what has been written on the "report", but I'll point out that:

 

a.) GIA (and any other serious lab) will not grade diamonds unless they are loose, because weight, cut, colour and clarity cannot be correctly assessed with a set diamond.

 

b.) The value conclusion is at the very least suspicious: how can something that you paid $8900 for be "worth" $21000 to replace?

 

If they have any return period during which they will give you your money back, I would return the ring and search elsewhere.

 

Otherwise, whether you have any recourse is doubtful; from your description, the sales associate kept referring to a "GIA gemologist report", not to a "GIA report", and that's what you got. My guess is that if you took this to a court of law you may even win the case, but it's not going to be easy. If you want to do this, put things in writing IMMEDIATELY and send a registered letter to the store, demanding that they return your money because they misled you by implying that a "GIA Gemmologist" is the same as GIA.

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Politely ask for a refund and start over.  Their gemologist isn't necessarily wrong but make no mistake, it's THEIR gemologist who's telling you this.  The reason you wanted a 'certificate', I assume, is that you wanted independent verification from a credible source of certain facts about what you bought.  Right?  You have not received this.

 

Country of origin, nationality of the cutter and even the address of the lab has nothing whatever to do with it.

 

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Thank you for your fast respond. The sales said give her another chance to find a diamond with a GIA certificate. Maybe I just tell them no, I don't like the way do business. For now, I just want to ask for refund, if they don't do that, I may just send them a registerd letter, for this, how can I do this? Get a lawyer? I will also report this to bbb. Wish me luck, my gf was so upset, we just want to get what we paid. It's not like we want pay less and get more.

Thank you everyone for the attention of this ..

 

 

Yes, you have been tricked.1) GIA will grade diamonds from anywhere in the world; they have labs in the US, Botswana, Israel, Hong Kong, India, Thailand, South Africa and Japan, and they all can grade diamonds from anywhere else.2) There is no such thing as a "US diamond", not least because the geology of the US, big as they are, is not suitable for mining diamonds (other than one place in Arkansas, which is not mined commercially).3) GIA does not certify anyone. http://www.gia.edu/UK-EN/Copyrights-Trademarks#certificationA report written by a GIA graduate (and there are different types of GIA courses, BTW) is not the same as a GIA lab report, just like the opinion of a Yale graduate on a legal matter is not the same as that of Yale University. 4) A GIA report (which now suddenly is obtainable - for $2000???) for a 1 carat diamond costs about $100 plus shipping. You can find the GIA price list here: http://www.gia.edu/UK-EN/gem-lab-service/diamond-grading(click on "Fee Schedule" then choose "Diamond") 5) I won't get into the details of what has been written on the "report", but I'll point out that:a.) GIA (and any other serious lab) will not grade diamonds unless they are loose, because weight, cut, colour and clarity cannot be correctly assessed with a set diamond.b.) The value conclusion is at the very least suspicious: how can something that you paid $8900 for be "worth" $21000 to replace?If they have any return period during which they will give you your money back, I would return the ring and search elsewhere.Otherwise, whether you have any recourse is doubtful; from your description, the sales associate kept referring to a "GIA gemologist report", not to a "GIA report", and that's what you got. My guess is that if you took this to a court of law you may even win the case, but it's not going to be easy. If you want to do this, put things in writing IMMEDIATELY and send a registered letter to the store, demanding that they return your money because they misled you by implying that a "GIA Gemmologist" is the same as GIA.

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I would start by asking them a refund. If they refuse, ask them why they refuse and then plan your response accordingly.

 

Personally, given the amount of incorrect information they have given you, I would not want to deal with that particular vendor again - whether you give them another chance is up to you.

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Refund rules vary dramatically from one store to the next but it's always driven by the fine print on the sales document. Take some time to read and understand it if you haven't already. In any case, if you decide you want a refund, the first step is to politely ask and listen to what they say in response. There's no value in getting ahead of yourself and worrying about lawyers and the like until you take this step. Some stores are easy and some are not but you'll never know until you ask.

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By the way, they can still get a GIA lab inspection if they want. What it takes is removing the stone from the setting, shipping it insured to GIA in either New York or California (or India, Botwatana et.al. I suppose), paying their fees, getting it back and resetting it. Assuming they're using FedEx or a similarly prompt carrier the whole process will take about a month, possibly just a couple of weeks, and cost a few hundred dollars.

 

If they do that and it comes back graded correctly, it's all good. They will have back up their grader and defended their honor, and you will have a better documented stone. The tricky part is deciding, in advance, what to do if it comes back different and exactly what differences are acceptable, what would trigger a refund and what would trigger a discount.

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