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Final Decision Making On $35,835.42 Ring


actonktm
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Just seen a 6 prong platinum setting, solitaire, 1.73ct, I colour, VS2 for £23,600 or $35,835.42 from a UK store.

 

Measurements 7.75 - 7.67 x 4.81mm
Precision of cut - excellent

Polish - excellent
Symmerty - excellent

 

Cut proportions

Total depth percentage - 62.8%
Table size percentage - 55%

Crown height percentage - 16.1%

Crown angle - 35.2 degrees
Star length percentage - 50%

Pavillion angle - 40.8%

Lower half length percentage - 80%

Girdle thickness - medium - slightly thick

Girdle finish - bruted

Culet - none

 

Have not seen clarity plot yet but I will be able to.

I will not be able to see ASET Scope analysis. 

 

I am ready to go ahead with this but need help as to what questions I should be asking them before I hand over my credit card.

 

I am very grateful for all your help and comments.

Edited by actonktm
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You skipped an important point.  You're buying this from Tiffany's.  I know this from your other thread.  That's sort of a mixed bag.  One of the reasons to buy from them is you can be confident that you're going to be treated well and get a fine product without the need to ask questions.  This is correct by the way.  The downside is that people don't ask questions, and the staff don't know the answers even when they do.  Their position is that you're buying Tiffany's, and you don't need to know any more.

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You can't be more sure - ASET or no ASET - than through direct observation and comparison. Reflector images are a way of simplifying some of the comparison process, but they aren't perfect diagnostics (in fact, very far from it).

 

Do you trust them? Yes. And your eyes. As Neil said, that's one of the downsides of shopping at Tiffany (or Cartier, or Van Cleef, or ...); what they sell is generally (and particularly by them) held to be of sufficiently high quality that you don't actually need to ask the questions. Just the price. :)

 

The price is reasonable for Tiffany (by definition!). It's more than twice the price you would pay for the "same item" shopping in a non-big-brand-name jeweller (then again, I'm the one that was - and still is - arguing for getting your lady what she wants).

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Tiffany is very consistent in their pricing.  They never have sales, and they charge you exactly the same as what they charge the next guy in line.  They tell you up front what things cost and they don't haggle.   In a lot of ways that makes the whole process easier and it's part of their sales pitch.  They take the hassle out of it.  Is it reasonable?  Nearly everyone who buys there goes home happy.  No one goes in thinking it's a cheap place to buy stuff and they make no claims that there aren't other stores that also sell good things for less money.  It's all very legit.  It's up to you to decide if they're worth their price but they have a very loyal following of people who think they are. 

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Interesting... the site seems to be a reincarnation of Ira Weissmann's "The Truth About Diamonds" older site, and Ira had a marketing affiliation with several vendors, including JA. It seems things haven't changed: https://www.diamonds.pro/truth-about/diamonds-pro/

 

In a sense, this site (specifically, the Diamond Finder database) is also affiliated with a few vendors - however the people providing advice on the forum do not work for the site nor are (usually) affiliated with any of the advertisers: in fact, I work for a diamond dealer that does not advertise on the Finder, and Neil doesn't sell any diamonds or jewellery (though he did in the past, prior to setting up as an appraiser).

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I don't think you can in any way be defined a fool. And the more I browse through their site, the more things I find that I disagree with.

 

Leaving "them" aside, the issue is the following:

 

What matters most? The symbolic aspect of getting her what she finds valuable, or the practical aspect of "I am getting X Y Z for the least money"?

 

If the former, then you aren't getting ripped off no matter how much you pay; you are buying intangibles. If the latter, then yes, you can find effectively the same thing for far less; then again, one could argue that you can get engaged with a ring from a can of Coke, or even with no ring at all - both are significantly cheaper than any diamond.

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the people providing advice on the forum do not work for the site nor are (usually) affiliated with any of the advertisers

To be accurate, this should be probably rephrased as: "do not work for the site nor are they required to be affiliated with any of the advertisers." Quite a few of the advertisers were among the prominent posters in the past, and a few still appear occasionally (and I hope others still will come up in the future!). No-one on the forum here is allowed to self-promote, which is the bit that I find ever-so-slightly-underhanded on the other site: under the guise of providing neutral advice, affiliate marketing cookies are used to track your clicks. Edited by davidelevi
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Ira (the owner of diamond.pro) makes his money by collecting a commission on stones that he recommends.  His biggest client, by far, is JA but no, I don't think there's any sort of shared ownership or anything like that.

 

Hermann (the owner of this site) makes his money by selling advertising.  In particular, dealers pay to have stones listed in the 'diamond finder' database as well as things like those coupons that appear on the home page.

 

As mentioned above, the different participants in the forum all have their own reasons for being here and it's ALWAYS good to pay attention to this sort of thing no matter what site you're looking at.  If anything it's foolish not to ask this question.  In the case of the pros, all here will have a link at the bottom of each and every post that leads to our own home page.  Mine is the blue text that says "Professional Appraisals in Denver" for example.  It's usually pretty clear from there what's being sold.  For most, it's a bunch of diamond dealers or jewelers.  Some work for the advertisers and some don't but they're hardly keeping it a secret.

 

I receive no remuneration of any kind from the site.  What I get out of it is that link and the fact that people read through the old threads and, hopefully, go away feeling that I know something useful.  If and when they need an appraiser, that tends to put me near the top of the list for consideration.   Mostly I think it works.  I don't pay the site anything either by the way.

 

Diamond.pro is a new name for truthaboutdiamonds.  They are one and the same. Frankly I think it's a better name.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Thought so. They are trying to talk me out of buying from Tiffany's. Davidelevi, I hope I am making a good choice buying this I VS2 1.73ct from Tiffany's. I am now getting scared about beig ripped off - I don't want to be a fool.

My understanding is that your bride has a strong preference for the Tiffany brand, which is not a gemological property.  That's why to shop there and yes, that costs extra.  I think it's flatly wrong to say it's a bad deal because that depends on what you and she find valuable.  No, Tiffs is not the only place you can get a lovely ring and no, they're not the cheapest by a long shot.   I assume you already knew that before you walked in the door.  What they are is the only place you can get a new TIFFANY ring.  It's the only place you can get the Tiffany shopping experience. Again I point out that nearly everyone who shops there goes home happy and no, they're not a bunch of fools. Edited by denverappraiser
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Update - So I went to the store to purchase the 1.7 I VS2 and ended up comparing to a 1.35 I VS1 which was £8.6k (or $13,115) cheaper.

Yes there was a size difference but not a $13k size difference in my opinion. When not comparing to the 1.7 the 1.35 looked great.

 

This has now made this decision even harder - glad that I will only have to do this once. Is it worth spending the extra?

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You're looping.  Pick your budget and live with it.  To be sure you can get a fine diamond for half of the price, and you can get a fine diamond for half of that price too.  The difference has to do with what you want to accomplish and what you can afford. This is a 100% symbolic product and the merits of it have to do with how your wife will view it.  By all means buy something you can afford but, frankly, I recommend against going cheaper just because it's cheaper.  

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I'm sitting a bit more on the fence on this one: I agree entirely with Neil, but I'm not sure that the extra 0.5 mm diameter is worth the money either. If it were my money, I'd go for the smaller stone, simply because a 1.35 is more than large enough (IMHO), particularly for the kind of people I am likely to hang out with. YMMV.

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We are delving into the psychology of the purchase here.  I'm not sure if any of us are really trained for this!  Davide, as much as I understand your preference for the smaller stone, I don't think the "people you hang out with" is relevant here.   The real question is what kind of people does actonktm hang out with and is that important to him?  Most of our customers come to us with a fairly good idea of what their budget is and we then help them find the largest stone that fits their budget while meeting all the parameters they feel are important. Part of the process allows them to actually see, either in our showroom or via actual live pictures, the difference between grades.  Sometimes, they realize the extreme subtlety of these differences and go in a direction that was not "by the book."  The one thing that they react to more than anything else is size and if they can get the slightly larger size while still having look good and in their budget, they invariably choose the larger stone.  This size difference can be very subtle, sometimes as small as a couple of tenths of a mm.  The 1.35 might look big enough on its' own, but compared side by side to the 1.7, I'm sure there is a noticeable difference in size.  So is it worth or not worth an extra $13K?  That is a much tougher question and one that is ultimately personal.  We can sit here and analyze the merits of each stone and possibly justify the price for you but we do not know what $13,000 means to you.  Suffice it to say that larger stones are rarer and get more expensive per carat than equally graded smaller stones.  Add to that the weight factor and the prices go up dramatically quickly.  The question goes back to the personal.  Would you prefer to give her the 1.7 or the 1.3?  Can you afford the larger?

 

This probably did not help you, but in this case you may need to help yourself.

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Just because I can afford something does not mean I need to buy it - I prefer to get a nice stone within budget and save if I can.

So the update is that I have contacted a few US stores and I am thinking off visiting NYC to buy from Tiffany's there. I am in discussion with a sales rep about two stones and the prices are $4k + off what Tiffany's in London charge.

 

1.45 color I, clarity VVS2 $22,754.88 inc 8% sales tax

 

1.50 color I, clarity VS2 $26,021.13 inc 8% sales tax

 

Both are triple ex cut with no fluro

 

Let me know your thoughs gentlemen.

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Be aware of the VAT that is going to hit you when you come home. I don't have a clue how Tiffany handles this but I"m a little surprised that they are different in different stores (they all have different inventory, of course, but even that is solvable by a simple FedEx shipment). Taxes can easily eat up your savings.

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Davide, as much as I understand your preference for the smaller stone, I don't think the "people you hang out with" is relevant here. The real question is what kind of people does actonktm hang out with and is that important to him?

Exactly, That's why I said "if it were my money" - not implying that people I keep company with have any relevance in actonktm's decision; however the people he keeps company with do... (and FWIW, I have a reasonably good perspective on the UK, having lived 20 years in or around London).
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With Tiffany it's difficult - they have physical outlets in pretty much every state, so the usual ruse of getting a hotel in New Jersey or Connecticut and having the goods shipped to you doesn't work (even though both NJ and CT have lower sales taxes than in Manhattan, so at least you can save 1.5-2%). It is possible to get vendors not to charge sales tax if you can demonstrate that you will export the product (I have managed it a few times), but I suspect the procedure is borderline legal and I doubt a company the size of Tiffany would go along with it.

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