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Please Give Me Some Advise On This Rock


mark1
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1.7 F VVS2  emerald cut diamond 

Polish- ex 

symmetry- ex. 

florescence- none 

table - 62%

depth- 68.6%

girdle- slightly thick - thick (faceted) 

measurements  7.66x 5.8x 3.98 

cloud feather and pinpoint located on outer facets no where near the table.  Im going off the report i couldnt see anything under 10x magnification.

 

the rock I am considering is the one on top  

 

Please let me know if this is a good choice. 

I am a little concerned going down to the F color but the E and D force me to greatly sacrifice size in my budget.

 

Also i was thinking of putting it into that setting. Please let me know what you guys think.  

 

 

post-134954-0-18388900-1429280681_thumb.jpg

post-134954-0-78278800-1429280681_thumb.jpg

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The biggest question I have at this point is: who is saying that the stone is F/VVS2? Is there a lab report that confirms that description? Which lab?

 

In a correctly (to GIA standards) graded F, you should have no concern whatsoever that it will have visible colour - and in fact I'd be surprised if you could see the difference to a D at all.

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F color is considered colorless and I would even venture to say that G should be considered the bottom of colorless rather than the top of near colorless.  An F color stone will be beautifully white and it should not be a worry to you.  The only place you would ever notice that whiter stones exist would be if you ever put it side by side next to a D (it is often very difficult to distinguish a difference between and E and an F), in a white color card with white lighting.  Once set, I doubt you will ever have occasion to examine your stone in such a clinical setting (read environment) again.

 

Editing to say that I am assuming this stone comes with a GIA grading report.  If not, as Davide alludes to, the color might not really be what it is being called.  i have seen plenty of EGL graded F colors that are in point of fact H, I and J.

 

The stone sounds beautiful. 

 

I hope this helps.

Edited by GeorgeDI
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I took all the above information from the GIA report. I couldn't see any flaws under the 10X loupe  and and i couldn't see any color difference next to an E stone. 

 

what about the cut/ measurements. the report doesn't list cut and even online on the GIA website i couldn't find it. 

 

Do you guys have any thoughts on Halo? Will it wash out the stone? 

 

Is F considered a high end color option or should i lower size to improve color. My jeweler said don't buy the paper buy the stone. opinions? 

 

What should a stone like the one i described cost? 

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How much things 'should' cost is a tricky sort of question but the first level of that is pretty easy.  There are dozens of comparable stones listed in the diamond finder utility at the top of the page. 

 

Spending a bit of time playing with it might be helpful.  It'll show you what changes in terms of price when you mess with one or more of the variables. 

 

GIA provides no information at all about cut on emerald cuts beyond the basic dimensions.  If you want more it's going to come from the dealer or your appraiser, not the lab.

Edited by denverappraiser
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GIA does not grade any non-round shape for cut, and the proportions/measurements listed are frankly useless to do much other than ruling out extreme cases (which "your" diamond is not).

 

F is definitely high end - and you have confirmation from your own eyes that you cannot see the difference between E and F (and as George says, I would think G as well). Since you/your fiancée will be wearing the stone, not the report, don't worry about what you cannot see... (incidentally, the same goes for VVS2 vs. VS2). I guess this is another way of saying "buy the stone, don't buy the paper".

 

A correctly made and set halo will not wash out anything, but to me the beauty of (large) emerald cuts is that they are less busy than brilliant cuts... do you want to make the design busy again? Also, consider that a split shank will be difficult to pair with a wedding band if you (she) want to wear both on the same finger.

 

Price: here are some similarly graded stones retailed by aggressive internet-based sellers http://www.diamondreview.com/diamonds/?sortOrder=price&sortDesc=1&fShape=Emrl&fCaratLo=1.70&fCaratHi=1.80&fColorLo=F&fColorHi=F&fClarityLo=VVS2&fClarityHi=VVS2&fCutLo=&fCutHi=poor&fDepthLo=50.0&fDepthHi=80.0&fTableLo=40.0&fTableHi=80.0&fSymLo=&fSymHi=poor&fPolLo=&fPolHi=poor&fCulLo=&fCulHi=vlarge&fFlrLo=&fFlrHi=vstrong&fPriceLo=0&fPriceHi=1000000&fLabGIA=1&fLabAGS=1

 

Two points to note:

 

1. There is a pretty wide range in prices due at least in part to cut quality... however the only way to judge that is to see the stone and get the opinion of experts on it (the vendor is one, though he/she may be biased).

 

2. A high street (or even worse mall-based) jeweller will have prices that are higher than the internet-based vendors, since his costs are significantly higher.

Edited by davidelevi
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would you be able to tell me about the cut given the measurements i have provided?

No. The problem is that the geometry of an emerald cut is significantly more difficult than the geometry of a round brilliant. AGS has a cut grade for emerald cuts, and it was a total commercial disaster. Realistically there are zero stones in the marketplace. The variables they use aren't recorded on the GIA (or AGS) grading reports so there's no good way to back into it. To some extent there's software to do it, and I even have it, but it's far from industry standard and it requires actually having the stone in hand.
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AGS has a cut grade for emerald cuts, and it was a total commercial disaster. Realistically there are zero stones in the marketplace.

I'll pull out my Dogbert The Quantifier hat and comment as follows:

 

32 out of 33,574 diamonds listed on the Diamond Finder have an AGS report.

 

e1a179706cc801301d50001dd8b71c47.jpg

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