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Color K


Mainer
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I would love to hear opinions,  experiences,  advice,  comments on the color K in diamonds.    Some will like it some will not.   I'm interested in all opinions.  

Edited by Mainer
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Flush set in 18k white (without rhodium).  I like the color in the diamond and I like the color in the gold. Neither is a particularly popular choice these days but it doesn't matter.  I like it, and mine is the only vote that counts.  When I show it to people they tend to be surprised on both counts.  They've been shown 'K' color diamonds in the store and they expected to see light yellow.  The problem is that those stones were really O-P or U-V either with no paperwork or with an off-brand that called it a K.  It's actually fairly recent that a K/VVS/AGS super-ideal is something the cutters want to produce.  That's not the most mainstream of requests, nor is specifically avoiding rhodium on 18k white.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Like the contrast - it's visibly gold, even if whiter than "normal" (and love the cut, but then again I'm biased). Do you know what alloy was used, Neil? 75 Au / 25 Ag?

 

If you want more photos of a very well cut K (incidentally, I think cut by the same people that cut Neil's stone), here are some:

 

http://www.diamondsbylauren.com/index.php/jewelry/crafted-by-infinity-round-brilliant-diamond-170ct-kvvs1-ideal-cut-agsl-r4437

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18k is, by definition, 75% gold.  What to do with that other 25% is what changes the color.  Using pure silver yields a very yellow look.  Adding a little copper makes it more durable so the 'standard' 18k yellow alloy recipe is mostly silver with a touch of copper.  standard 14k yellow is the same components.

 

Palladium, nickel, zinc and a few other's make it white, but white gold isn't really all that white.  It's not the color of chrome or aluminum.  If you've got anything made of white gold and you hold it up to the bumper on your car you'll see the difference right away.  That's ok, but people tend to expect white white white, and that's why nearly everything new is rhodium plated.  They look good in the case and they give people what they expect.  It's sort of like the reason realtors paint everything beige.  No one objects.  Rhodium is very white so the question never comes up.

 

14k palladium white, which is 42% Pd, is decidedly whiter than mine by the way.  You would not see the warm tint that you do in my ring although it still doesn't have that chrome plated look that rhodium gives.  Pd white is unusual mostly because Pd is kind of expensive.  Zinc and nickel are cheap and have a more pronounced bleaching effect.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Just for reference, this is a brooch made with 50% gold and 50% silver (bit of an unusual alloy today, but common in antiquity). I think it's still visibly yellower than what I would expect Neil's ring to be:

IMG_0575_zps58186b23.jpg

Bear in mind that the white roundel is bone, so it's not "white white".

 

Other side of the same, with an ebony roundel and white enamel decoration:

IMG_0576_zps6eff2636.jpg

 

By comparison, this is 22k gold (91.6% Au, 8% Ag, 0.4% Cu - I was there when the goldsmith was melting the alloy for this pair):

IMG_0586_zps0d515b1a.jpg

Edited by davidelevi
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I knew that white gold was generally coated with Rhodium to give it a whiter appearance but I didn't realize that  under the Rhodium was that warm white gold.  Fashion is a funny thing.  The warm white gold is much more attractive than coated gold.   

 

Love the earrings.   They look very Etruscan and very gold!!!

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