Jump to content

Help With The Emerald Cut Diamonds.


CmUhOh
 Share

Recommended Posts

My fiance is leaning towards an emerald or asscher cut diamond. She likes the geometry of the design even though they tend to lack fire and sparkle IMO. Clarity seems to be much more important than with round or princess cuts. Even on some VS2 graded diamonds we can notice the inclusions, particularly carbon spots. But SI1 in a princess or round still looks eye clean. These are GIA rated stones as they appear to the most highly regarded grading institute.

 

 

 

As for ratio she likes 1.33-1.43 instead of 1.5 or higher which most jewelers seem to say is ideal proportions. There doesn't seem to be an ideal cut standards though. Clarity and symmetry seem to be more important than with other cuts. Are there particular tables or depths one should look for? What qualities should I be looking for in an emerald or asscher cut diamond? 

 

 

If it matters budget is around $8k USD for the center stone with 1.0-1.5ct with min clarity of VS1 and Color H.      

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also need help understanding contrast and what factors can contribute to it. To illustrate here's 3 pics. One is very white, one is very dark and the last is preferred for us as it has nice contrast and leads to nicer brilliance. 

 

1. Lack of contrast, too white. 

post-134887-0-75785000-1425760319.jpg

 

2. Too thick band of black

post-134887-0-86702700-1425760354.jpg

 

3. Okay contrast of white and black. 

post-134887-0-26995400-1425760407.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for ratio she likes 1.33-1.43 instead of 1.5 or higher which most jewelers seem to say is ideal proportions. There doesn't seem to be an ideal cut standards though. Clarity and symmetry seem to be more important than with other cuts. Are there particular tables or depths one should look for? What qualities should I be looking for in an emerald or asscher cut diamond?

Ignore any claims to "ideal proportions" - first of all, no-one can tell you (or your fiancée) what to like; secondly, as you point out, there is no established, agreed standard for assessing emerald cuts. Thirdly, even for rounds - where such standards exist - there are significant variations in the appearance of stones that are deemed "well cut".

 

In particular, table and depth are largely irrelevant in assessing ANY cut. They appear on reports because they are relatively easy to measure and use for ID purposes, not because they are important.

 

What should you look for is the same as in any other cut: liveliness, interesting light patterns, brightness, fire. This GIA article, though written for rounds, provides a good primer: http://diamondcut.gia.edu/pdf/cut_fall2004.pdf

 

You seem to have set boundaries for yourself in terms of clarity (which are statistically reasonable, even though there are eye-clean SI1 and SI2 emerald cuts), and at least in my opinion colour is a pure matter of personal preference. These are accurately captured by a reliable lab report.

 

How to get information about cut quality - including visual symmetry - is a different matter; since you cannot rely on lab reports for this, you need different sources. In my personal order of preference:

 

1. See diamonds in person.

2. Get a chosen expert (which could be the seller - as long as you trust their honesty and expertise) to see the diamonds.

3. Broad, good quality "normal" photographic documentation, particularly in comparing stones from the same seller

4. Reflector images - again more useful in comparing from same source than across sellers; though the equipment is relatively standardised, the technique for using it and skill in taking images are not...

5. Opinion of non-expert friends, relatives, priests, astrologers.

6. Simplistic grading systems (e.g. AGA cut class). These are - in my personal opinion - at best useful for discarding outliers, but not for selecting among "reasonably" cut stones.

7. Mumbo-jumbo formulas (by which I mean any system that purport to tell you "something" about the stone, but where it is not clear what is being measured and graded and/or how it relates to visual appearance. Pretty much all vendor-provided cut grading "systems" and various pieces of "light return measurement" apparatus enter this category in my opinion).

 

I also need help understanding contrast and what factors can contribute to it.

If the comments to the images are your comments, and not comments from GOG copied-and-pasted, you seem to have a pretty good understanding of contrast. The factors contributing to it are the angles of the various facets and the type and orientation of lighting sources and obstructions. There is no (easy) formula to predict or measure contrast; on the other hand, you can easily identify it when seeing the stone.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second all of Davide's comments.  In addition, I would like to point out that if she is showing a preference for 1.33:1 to 1.5;1 ratios of length:width, then you can forget about the Asschers as they are typically square (<1.05:1).  With emerald cuts it is most important to see the stones and short of doing this in person, try to get multiple pictures of the stones from slightly different angles to see their patterning.  Real shots with real light.  If you are considering multiple stones, then ask for pictures with the stones side by side in order to get a real feel of how they compare to each other.  Make sure whoever you choose to purchase from has a generous return policy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice.  We were looking at the standard round cut and those listed as ideal cuts did seem to look better than stones with vg cuts. But with emerald cuts there's no standard cut grading that would make it easier to purchase online or without seeing the stone. Some do look very good in pics but they purposely choose a flattering angle.After having seen them in person it's a different story so I'm going to resign myself to the fact that I'll buy from a b&m so to speak. This way I can view the stone in person and see if its what we want.    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice.  We were looking at the standard round cut and those listed as ideal cuts did seem to look better than stones with vg cuts. But with emerald cuts there's no standard cut grading that would make it easier to purchase online or without seeing the stone. Some do look very good in pics but they purposely choose a flattering angle.After having seen them in person it's a different story so I'm going to resign myself to the fact that I'll buy from a b&m so to speak. This way I can view the stone in person and see if its what we want.    

Of course the photos are taken from flattering angle, with a skilled photographer using excellent equipment and under desirable lighting.  These things a glamour shots, not mug shots. That's the whole point.  The same applies to b&m's.  Store lighting and display environments are not an accident.  I'm certainly a fan of shopping with local stores but the general shopping rules remain the same.  The deal isn't, or at least shouldn't be, done until you've had a chance to look at it in a variety of lighting, show it to your friends, neighbors, appraiser and even competitive jewelers.  The extra thing that you're agreeing to by shopping online is a slightly slower process and possibly a bit of shipping.

Edited by denverappraiser
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
  • Create New...