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Can Someone Explain What This Picture Is Showing?


Mainer
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http://www.infinity-diamonds.com/protected/uploaded_files/stones/6912/cert1416305829ucqYgWnqkfnfHMm5M8NK.jpg

 

What do the marks on the H&A picture represent?   I have never seen marks like theses.  The AGS report (see above link) shows a medium large crystal in the center of this Sl1  diamond.   There is one other small inclusion but nothing that would indicate these marks across the entire diamond.   

post-134026-0-08552600-1424637972_thumb.jpg

Edited by Mainer
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It is showing a nicely cut stone with an inclusion (a crystal of some mineral) being reflected several times in the pavilion. Whether that is visible "in reality" vs. being an artefact of observing the stone through an H&A viewer is a completely different question, and one that requires seeing the stone in person to answer.

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You can see that it's the same shape reflected several times, just not very symmetrically (i.e. 8 x one in each pavilion main or 16 x one for each lower girdle); bear in mind that the crystal - which seems quite irregularly shaped - is not positioned centrally with respect to the pavilion, and the H&A viewer uses some relatively "unusual" optics not made to display inclusions...

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Given that the crystal must have shown up in the uncut diamond why expend the time to give this diamond such a good cut.   I'm making the assumption that a good cut takes more expertise, precision and  time  to execute than a poorer cut,  which would  increases the cost  and reduce the profit.   (That may not be a good assumption)

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Excellent cutting increases both prices and salability.  I'm actually a bit surprised at how few superbly cut stones I see with low color and clarity, Say I1/M.  Good cutting really does make them look a lot better and the loss of weight isn't nearly as expensive as it is with, say, VVS/E.

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The fact that you can see the crystal in the image does not automatically imply you can see it in reality without a loupe - there are a number of artefacts in the image. In fact, as an SI1, I'd expect it to be eye clean.

A good (or as in this case really good) cut increases cost, but also allows the seller to charge a premium price in a way that is not particularly correlated to clarity:

Cut   Normal     Premium    
SI1     100        150

VVS1    150        190 

 

(Illustrative but relatively realistic price indices for a 1.10 G colour round)

 

For sure the cutter knew the crystal was there; if not when he bought the rough, definitely after cutting the first facet. It still makes it a perfectly viable decision to invest in cut quality, particularly if - as I think may be the case - the crystal is not visible with the naked eye

Edited by davidelevi
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Clarity can't be changed.  It is whatever it is.  The mine produces whatever God put there, or less.  Cut is different.  That's someone's work product.  It's not so much that cut trumps clarity as that cut is something they can actually do something about.  The classic tradeoff is with SIZE.  Better cutting generally results in lighter weight, as well as higher costs.  Historically the money has tipped that towards size but it's definitely changed lately.  People like good cuts and are willing to pay to get them.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Well, it depends on what you mean by "trump". A well cut stone will generally seem cleaner - not least because it returns more light; also, you can specifically target cut so that it removes or renders some inclusions less visible - though this may involve trading off other aspects (e.g. weight or brilliance or evenness of colour).

 

It also happens that SI1 is not all that bad as clarity goes; for most gems what is known as "SI1" for diamonds would be VVS or thereabouts, considering that diamond is the only gem which is graded under magnification (and this has more to do with commercial interests than anything else), and most SI1 inclusions are indeed difficult to see without a loupe. As such, if I have a clean or nearly clean stone, cut quality can have a big impact on both appearance and price; you may find different things going on with price if you talk about I1-I2, where the extent to which the inclusion(s) are aesthetically compromising the stone is more important (and thus cut becomes less so). This said - I have seen a few I1 cut by the same cutter (Paul Slegers), and they generally are beautiful stones, cut to the same level of care and quality that Paul lavishes on VVS or IF diamonds. They definitely go for a premium over run-of-the-mill I1.

 

BTW - the table in my post above should say "VVS2", not "VVS1", because that's what I used to make the price differences approximately equal.

Edited by davidelevi
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