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Need Some Opinions On A 3.84 Cushion Cut


cushionstonebuyer
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Hi guys,

Been reading these forums for the past month or two and found something that I finally felt I needed your opinions on.

The stone is a 3.84 Cushion cut I looked at in a local jewelry store today. The jeweler got it on loan from a seller and called me in.

Looking at the stone with my somewhat limited knowledge, I decided its a stone I'd consider purchasing.

It was eye clean, with very minimal inclusions (the biggest one to stand out was a small little black dot inside). Other than that the stone looked gorgeous but then again I'm no expert.

Unfortunately I didn't have a chance to snap any photos but we stacked up the stone next to an H and I barely noticed a difference. Then I stacked it up to an E and obviously noticed a difference but it was not as large as I expected as I have seen some I's that were very warm.

For an SI1 this stone looked very clean.

The price for the stone is roughly $38K. What do you guys think about the stone in general and the price?

The gentleman that provided the stone to the jeweler is leaving out of the country again and wanted the stone back if I am not going to purchase it in the next few days so I probably need to make a decision soon.

post-134864-0-36838400-1424334984_thumb.png

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Price seems reasonable. As to the rest of the stone, the two typical big questions are about clarity and cut, perhaps followed by colour, and ALL of them are about subjective preferences with an I/SI1 cushion.

 

The only thing I would suggest is that you sleep over it, and if you haven't done so look at a few alternatives in perhaps different sizes, colours and clarities (not to mention cut, but with cushions it's pretty difficult to categorise), to make sure that you remain as enthusiastic as you are now.

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I agree with everything Davide says above.  Cushions are not subject to the same cutting standards as rounds and thus much of the decision falls on the buyer's opinion.  Do you like the overall shape?  Do you like the way it looks indoors as well as in daylight?  I have mentioned this in earlier posts, but it bears repeating: as a stone gets larger, small inclusions become easier to see.  These become even more visible as the diamond gets dirty and the scintillation is diminished.  You should clean you stone regularly and for that we recommend a soft toothbrush and dish soap (close the drain please).  You need to decide if the inclusion you can already see when the stone is perfectly clean will be bothersome as it becomes more visible.  As Davide suggests, look at cleaner stones as well before you make the decision. 

 

I hope this helps,

 

Good luck.

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the biggest one to stand out was a small little black dot inside

The pictures look nice but it is quite difficult to tell.  There is nothing obvious to be seen here.  My concern was with your ability to see the "small little black dot inside."  As I mentioned earlier, the decision is yours to make, we can only point out the things to look for.

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This diamond looks nice but it is hard to tell without seeing in person. I agree with Davide and George above. It often comes down to how the diamond faces up to your naked eye since cushion cuts have no cut grade analysis from GIA. The diamond has Excellent polish and symmetry grades which are nice, and decent diameter for its weight. If you can see the inclusion with the naked eye, you have to make a determination if that bothers you or think about if it would bother your significant other. Price is reasonable.

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Thanks,

 

I have seen the stone in person and its very nice. I can not see any inclusions with the naked eye, with a loop I can see a very small one a little off to the side of the table somewhere inside the stone.

 

My primary concern at this point is light return but obviously that will be very hard to judge with a video / image

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Light return cannot be evaluated from a photo.  To a certain extent it's possible with reflector images like ASET's and Idealscopes but even that is problematic.  Light return compared to what?  Cushions are, in general, pretty bad in this area.  Why people like them is the girdle outline and the life as they move.  That's not in a photo either by the way.  Some dealers will make a stab at providing this sort of data but I'll warn you it sets you up for a quandary.  You aren't prepared to analyze it.  You can get amateurs on forums to give you their thoughts but since you don't have a baseline and you don't even know who is giving an opinion, what have you really learned?  You can hire your own expert to help, which works if you've got the right expert but leads to questions of what to do with THEIR results.  That leads back to what the dealer has to say.  Ask them for an ASET, ask them for an analysis of it, and then use your BS filter to decide if you believe them.  That has as much to do with evaluating the jeweler as with evaluating diamonds and yes, it's a worthwhile exercise. 

Edited by denverappraiser
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Neil is totally correct here.  Light return is very difficult to quantify at best, in Cushion cut diamonds. Most prefer this diamond because they love the shape, and if your significant other prefers this shape too, its the right choice!

Perhaps your jeweler of choice would be willing to bring in a Cushion Brilliant diamond to compare with the Cushion Modified Brilliant. There are differences in the cutting style on the pavilion between the two and some would say they prefer the Cushion Brilliant over the Cushion Modified Brilliant, especially Cushion Brilliant cuts with 8 pavilion main facets !Your light return considerations may be easier if you could see two or three stones side by side.  This might be difficult though depending on your jewelers relationships in the industry, and their willingness to continue "the search" so to speak, not to mention the cost they would incur to do it.

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$38,000 seems a lot to pay for something you seem unsure about and there seems to be some time pressure from the seller.   How knowledgable is this jeweler?  Does s/he a good professional reputation.    Do you trust his/her judgement?   If not why not buy on line from sources that have expert advisors, give more technical information and have either buy back and/or 10 day free inspection policies.   

Edited by Mainer
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