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H Color Vs1 Or I Si1 For 0.2 More In Carat? Please Advise Me. Thanks


chanel_tr
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Hi,

I'm new to diamond world, and looking for an e-ring. I like a decent size (aka bling). lol these are the two that I consider. Please help me pick which one is better in specs and value.  If #2 is eye clean, will I color diamond look yellow compares to H color?  Thanks!!!!

 

1.   http://www.gia.edu/cs/Satellite?reportno=2186645010&childpagename=GIA%2FPage%2FReportCheck&pagename=GIA%2FDispatcher&c=Page&cid=1355954554547

 

 

 

2.   http://www.gia.edu/cs/Satellite?reportno=1189184975&childpagename=GIA%2FPage%2FReportCheck&pagename=GIA%2FDispatcher&c=Page&cid=1355954554547

 

 

#2 is about $2k cheaper than #1. 

 

Can someone help me by providing a fair price range for each diamond. thank you. I really appreciate it.

 

 

 

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It's a matter of deciding what you like.  Both stones are advertised in the database at the top of the page called the 'diamond finder' so you can use that to get a pretty good benchmark on pricing.  #2 is closer to $3000 cheaper from these guys. I would pick it for that reason.  The drop from H-I and VS1-SI1 wouldn't bother me, and bumping up from 1.57 to 1.71 would please me.

 

http://www.gia.edu/cs/Satellite?reportno=2186645010&childpagename=GIA%2FPage%2FReportCheck&pagename=GIA%2FDispatcher&c=Page&cid=1355954554547

 

http://www.gia.edu/cs/Satellite?reportno=1189184975&childpagename=GIA%2FPage%2FReportCheck&pagename=GIA%2FDispatcher&c=Page&cid=1355954554547

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Check out this one as a comp from those same guys.  It's a terrible photo, which may be why it's still around.  A bad pic in the ad doesn't make it a bad diamond but people aren't always good at dealing with that.  They CAN take pretty good pictures if they actually have the stone.  There may be a little bit of legwork to get them to take new images but it may be worth asking and as I recall they're pretty cooperative about that sort of thing if their own supplier will let them.  It's another $1000 cheaper and otherwise pretty similar looking.  Ask 'em about it.

 

 

http://www.gia.edu/cs/Satellite?reportno=1189184975&childpagename=GIA%2FPage%2FReportCheck&pagename=GIA%2FDispatcher&c=Page&cid=1355954554547

Edited by denverappraiser
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Check out this one as a comp from those same guys.  It's a terrible photo, which may be why it's still around.  A bad pic in the ad doesn't make it a bad diamond but people aren't always good at dealing with that.  They CAN take pretty good pictures if they actually have the stone.  There may be a little bit of legwork to get them to take new images but it may be worth asking and as I recall they're pretty cooperative about that sort of thing if their own supplier will let them.  It's another $1000 cheaper and otherwise pretty similar looking.  Ask 'em about it.

 

 

http://www.gia.edu/cs/Satellite?reportno=1189184975&childpagename=GIA%2FPage%2FReportCheck&pagename=GIA%2FDispatcher&c=Page&cid=1355954554547

 

I found this diamond on ED cheapest price compares to other vendors. however, I'm worrying it wont be eye clean? Can you help me look at it please . they have pictures on their website. thank you very much 

 

https://enchanteddiamonds.com/diamonds/view/R171-SSNZR2?cid=diamondreview

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The vast majority of SI1's are eye clean in that size range and the answer to the question involves looking at diamonds, not just photos.  Step 1 of that is to have THEM look at it.  Step 2 is to buy it and look at it yourself.  Step 3 is to have your own expert look at it.  If she's in on it, have the bride look at it.  If any of those fail, send it back.   I notice that the ad in your link is more expensive than the ad I found.  They may have raised the price since they listed it here or it may simply be an error on one or both but I would ask them about it. 

 

H vs I is a trickier question.  Most people start to see color in an unmounted stone at about that range if they're looking closely.  Mounted and it drops to J or even K.  This has a lot to do with you.  I's are very popular because they're cheaper.  G's and H's are more expensive for exactly this reason.   The solution here is to go and look at some real diamonds. I'd start at one of the big stores with a lot of inventory.  Pick a jeweler or two and go shopping, live and in person.  Look at GIA graded stones only so you're comparing apples to apples. Look at excellent cut only, SI2 and above, and pay attention to the lighting.  They should be happy to show you what they have and make you a pitch.  Leave the credit card at home and listen more than you talk  This is an education exercise. The question on the table is whether YOU can tell the difference and you simply can't do this from a photo.  FWIW, most people can't.

Edited by denverappraiser
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thank you for your advice! this is a different diamond than the one I found hence the price difference. If a diamond has a brown tinge to it, is it still worth buying? i'm not very color sensitive. I cannot tell any color face up unless its quite different. Like I looked at D-E-F and if they are not on a white piece of paper I cannot tell which one is which. thats how blind I am LOL!

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Brown tinge: GIA guidelines hold that the colour of the tinge is not reliably defined until you reach K-level saturation (at which point it gets graded as "faint brown"); in any case if it doesn't have a brown tint, it's because it will have a yellow or grey one: choose your poison (of the 3, I prefer brown).

 

Not being able to distinguish D from F without some aid is perfectly normal; I don't know anyone who can do it reliably once the stone is mounted.

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Brown tinge: GIA guidelines hold that the colour of the tinge is not reliably defined until you reach K-level saturation (at which point it gets graded as "faint brown"); in any case if it doesn't have a brown tint, it's because it will have a yellow or grey one: choose your poison (of the 3, I prefer brown).

 

Not being able to distinguish D from F without some aid is perfectly normal; I don't know anyone who can do it reliably once the stone is mounted.

 

Would it be a mistake if I pick this instead of 1.57ct from previous post ? Thanks

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I'm confused as to which is "this". There are 2 1.71 I/SI1 (GIA reports ending 3137 and 4975), and I'd say they are both very nicely cut (as is the 1.57). The key question is whether they are eye-clean to your satisfaction, and Neil has outlined perfectly how to answer it.

 

For my money, and assuming both are eye clean, I'd get either one instead of the 1.57, and save $$$ in the process. The 1.57 is a much safer bet from a cleanness point of view, but I suspect you won't see a great difference in colour if any at all, and you will have a smaller stone (just visibly so) and a significantly lighter wallet.

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1 - Pick your dealer.

 

2 - Then pick a stone (note, many people try to reverse these two. It's a mistake).

 

3 - Have your dealer look at it in person and ask whatever questions you have. Repeat step 2 as needed.

 

4 - Assuming it passes #3, ship it in and have a look at it yourself.

 

5 - Show it to your friends, appraiser, mother, astrologer,or even a competitive jeweler to see if it's the right one. Include your setter on this list if you're using a local jeweler for this.

 

6 - If it's a problem with any of the above, ship it back within the return period and try again. If the problem is that you think the dealer misled you in step 3, pick a different dealer. Otherwise, repeat from step 2.

 

7 - Ship or deliver it to your setter, even if that's back to the same company who sold it.

 

8 - Have the finished item quality inspected by your appraiser and documented for insurance. Have this done by someone independent of the deal, meaning not the seller, setter, or ring manufacturer.

 

9 - Bind an insurance policy using the report from #8 above which, among other things, should include a copy of the GIA paperwork the original seller provided and possibly also information provided by the setting manufacturer.

 

10 - Make the presentation.

Edited by denverappraiser
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1 - Pick your dealer.

 

2 - Then pick a stone (note, many people try to reverse these two. It's a mistake).

 

3 - Have your dealer look at it in person and ask whatever questions you have. Repeat step 2 as needed.

 

4 - Assuming it passes #3, ship it in and have a look at it yourself.

 

5 - Show it to your friends, appraiser, mother, astrologer,or even a competitive jeweler to see if it's the right one. Include your setter on this list if you're using a local jeweler for this.

 

6 - If it's a problem with any of the above, ship it back within the return period and try again. If the problem is that you think the dealer misled you in step 3, pick a different dealer. Otherwise, repeat from step 2.

 

7 - Ship or deliver it to your setter, even if that's back to the same company who sold it.

 

8 - Have the finished item quality inspected by your appraiser and documented for insurance. Have this done by someone independent of the deal, meaning not the seller, setter, or ring manufacturer.

 

9 - Bind an insurance policy using the report from #8 above which, among other things, should include a copy of the GIA paperwork the original seller provided and possibly also information provided by the setting manufacturer.

 

10 - Make the presentation.

 

Thank you! I just wanna make sure I color doesn't have any tint BC I saw H and its so white to me! And u said I and H color look relatively the same. So does I color diamond need to have fluorescence or not? BC I heard H shouldn't have flourescense. Thank you so much for your detailed advice .

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1) Go look. Colour sensitivity varies from person to person. H and I are close, but then so are H and G.

 

2) Fluorescence is a non issue for either colour: it only works in UV-rich environments, which practically means only open sunlight. IF you picked a stone with strong or very strong fluorescence, you'd also need to check that it doesn't affect transparency (in sunlight).

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1) Go look. Colour sensitivity varies from person to person. H and I are close, but then so are H and G.

 

2) Fluorescence is a non issue for either colour: it only works in UV-rich environments, which practically means only open sunlight. IF you picked a stone with strong or very strong fluorescence, you'd also need to check that it doesn't affect transparency (in sunlight).

 

Thank you! Because I'm buying it online so I cannot see H vs I . the pictures provided don't help much either. Does I color diamond sell for lower value ? Thanks

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Thank you! Because I'm buying it online so I cannot see H vs I . the pictures provided don't help much either. Does I color diamond sell for lower value ? Thanks

Yes, all else being equal, I will cost less than H.

 

Even if you are planning on purchasing online, there is nothing stopping you from visiting a jeweller locally and asking to see GIA or AGS (or HRD) graded diamonds...

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