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Real Black Diamond?


MissHB
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It sounds unlikely; half decent quality irradiated black diamonds go for about $100/carat + VAT loose, so getting 5 carat plus labour for setting (and something for the ring, even if it's just silver) for $200 looks a bit too good to be true.

 

The report is useless (to me at least) since it comes from an unknown lab; it may or may not be correct, but given what I wrote above I doubt it is.

Edited by davidelevi
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What the certificate means that some anonymous and uncontactable person in India saw a stone that they thought was a diamond, it was black, and they called it natural.  What's missing is clues about whether they had any idea what they were doing or if what they saw has anything whatever to do with what you're being sold.  There are a lot of people in India.  That's up to you.  Personally, I wouldn't find it very useful and, at the very least, the burden would be on the seller to convince me that this has any relevance to anything at all.

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Perhaps shopping for transparent diamonds is easier; I'm not certain it is, actually, but for sure it's a lot more expensive...

 

BTW, getting a black diamond isn't very difficult either. The vast majority are treated (irradiated) and quite inexpensive - at least for diamonds, but going for the ultimate cheap price means running the risk of getting a piece of black glass (or even plastic) instead of a diamond.

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You need to distinguish between natural origin of the material (diamond) and natural origin of the colour (black). Fully natural blacks exist, but they are relatively expensive (say $1000/carat to several thousands/carat for large stones).

 

The vast majority of black diamonds you see around have been treated, but remain natural (i.e. not synthetic) diamonds; unscrupulous dealers play on this no end, though with blacks the problem is minor since prices are relatively low (for diamonds, that is!). With other colours, such as pink, a 1 carat stone may be worth several $100,000 if the colour is natural, but only a few $1000 if the colour is enhanced artificially.

 

Lab reports from good labs are expensive; they are unlikely to appear on stones worth only a few hundred $, so your best bet is choosing the dealer well.

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  • 6 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

Black Diamonds have become THE diamonds for current diamond jewelry,surpassing all colored diamond categories. Must be the mystery of the color black.The theories of Black Diamond formation have much to do with that,especially since they have been linked to supernovas. About a decade ago black diamonds were cheap, because most collectors and researchers weren’t interested in them. But a recent marketing campaign put the stones in the spotlight, so prices have risen sharply. Today black diamonds are sold for prices that are comparable to those of white diamonds. Check out how to go about buying black diamonds.

 

Learn about black diamonds. There are plenty of resources available to learn all about black diamonds. Black diamonds are crystallized carbon, just like regular diamonds. Either the color black occurs due to dark inclusions, or due to changes in a white diamond due to high temperatures or radiation.
  • A natural black diamond is quite rare and naturally very expensive. Most black diamonds occur as irregular black masses called carbonados. (Portuguese for black).Most black diamonds in the market today are treated. Treatment of gemstones is a process that dates back to several centuries. In fact, were it not for these, we wouldn’t know our gemstones as we do. An untreated tanzanite looks nowhere near the form it is used in jewelry as.
  • Black diamonds are treated to achieve that uniformity of black color. This is the norm of the industry, so long as you are not buying a black diamond believing it to be a natural black diamond. Those command astonishingly high prices.

 

 

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Edited by Antoinemcox
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Hello Antoine, welcome to DiamondReview.

 

If you work for a divorce attorney, you are still welcome... I think ;) but please stick to facts when posting:

 

Today black diamonds are sold for prices that are comparable to those of white diamonds.

No they are not - at least not typically. A treated 1 ct black will go for a few hundred $; a decent quality 1 carat near-colourless will go for a few thousands.

 

A natural black diamond is quite rare and naturally very expensive.

Natural blacks are rarer than treated blacks, but aren't really "rare" either in comparison to diamonds or to other gems. Same for "very expensive": a number of large natural blacks (over 5 ct each) were for sale today on eBay at around $2000/carat; this isn't cheap, but it's easily in the range of several stones that once would have been called "semiprecious".

 

Black diamonds are treated to achieve that uniformity of black color. This is the norm of the industry, so long as you are not buying a black diamond believing it to be a natural black diamond. Those command astonishingly high prices.

Yes, the majority of blacks (which are actually very dark green) is treated; natural blacks are more expensive but not "astonishingly" so - certainly not for diamonds.
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I just joined and found this topic. The lab in question is one frequently used by eBay vendors out of India. The lab has a web site but I've never liked the look of it. I would, just seeing this cert, tend to want to ID the stones as black moissanite.  I bought such a stone advertised as diamond a couple of years ago just to see what the UK's AnchorCert Lab would make of it. The gem report returned synthetic moissanite; and though the cert was not shipped to me with the stone, the stone was pictured with an identical cert to the one in the OP at the time of auction. The only differences were carat weight and dimensions.

 

I hold the GIA Diamonds certification circa 1997.

Edited by Jocelyn Jensen
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