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How Important Is Color???


pbeigbabai
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Hello,

 

 

First post on the site so if i sound foolish please bear with me  :) .

Looking to buy a stone that i can mount on a ring locally in Toronto, Canada.

 

Been doing a bit of research and i am very close to making a decision as to what i want but i need help with color.

 

Looking to spend around 10k. I am sure i want a FL or IF stone. Also want a excellent cut as the sparkle is very important for me. Any stone that i see i run through the HCA online formula to make sure it gets an excellent score.

 

What i am not sure about is color. Should i buy a bigger stone with lets say L or K color or a smaller one with F or G color.

 

I want the stone to hold its full value as i would want to upgrade in the future for sure.

 

Would appreciate your comments.

 

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Hi!

 

I recommend staying between D-J if this is for an engagement ring. 

 

But I also think FL-IF are overkill. Why do you want to stick to FL-IF?

 

You should always stick to GIA, AGS or HRD. 

 

HCA is pretty outdated in my opinion, it rejects a ton of beautiful diamonds. Cut is everything but the GIA falls a bit short of rating cut for sparkle and fire. 

 

My advice is to get a Sarine Light Report if those things are important to you. They do a spectacular job of grading and reporting of such, here is an example: http://srn.co/v?6E0H1H5Y8H

 

If not the next best thing would be to purchase a diamond with ASET/IdealScope or from a jeweler who is known for rating diamonds for fire and brilliance (a few exist). 

Edited by Joshua Niamehr
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Hello Joshua,

 

 

Thanks for the reply.

 

I am sticking to FL or IF because for me to buy a diamond with defects is like buying a TV with burnt pixels in it. 

Rather save and buy a good TV  :)

 

I am actually only looking for GIA certified stones. As for the Sarine report, i will make sure i get one when i actually choose the diamond i am going to buy.

 

 

Thanks again

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Thats not a good comparison... Dead pixels would drive me insane because I can see them with my naked eye.

 

I would never be able to live with a TV or phone that has dead pixels.

 

But a diamonds brilliance and fire arent always impacted by its inclusions.

 

This is where a Sarine Report comes in. There can be SI1 diamonds that are brighter and livelier than FL-IF diamonds.

 

Dont waste your money on FL/IF - go with VVS1 or VVS2 if clarity matters that much... FL/IF is a waste of allocation in my opinion.  

 

What is your target budget and size?

Edited by Joshua Niamehr
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Go have a look at VVS diamonds in person and VS diamonds in person. Look at super ideal, ideal cut diamonds, versus excellent and see which appeals most to you.

 

I would rather know that I have a fireball of a diamond (why I suggested a Sarine Light Report) versus knowing that my diamond has a tiny speck that I cant see with the naked eye and having a hard time with a diamond loupe as well.

 

Cut is the most important C.

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I guess you are right i wont be constantly looking at the stone and wont be visible with the naked eye anyways.

Just the fact that i will know about those tiny imperfections inside  :mellow: .

 

Thanks for sharing your knowledge and  i will see if i can convince myself to go down to VVS.

I'm firmly with Joshua on this one. FWIW, also consider that "flawless" as it is used in diamond grading is frankly an arbitrary definition; it means "the diamond does not contain inclusions visible face up using 10 magnification". Up the magnification at 100x (or 1000x), and you will find "something". Equally, bring it down to 5x (or the natural 1x under which all other gems are graded), and you will find a lot less; there is nothing magical about the number 10.
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‘Hold it’s full value’ is a very loaded, and decidedly non-gemological, question.  Diamonds are, in general, bad financial vehicles.  The problem isn’t in the rock, it’s in the marketplace.  You’re buying at retail and you’re selling at below wholesale.  Nearly everyone takes a significant haircut.  Selling diamonds is tough but to be sure, a L/IF/xxx will be harder than usual to sell.  The exception has to do with dealer supplied deals.  Some jewelers will accept a trade in of things that you bought from them against a future purchase.  This is a contractual arrangement that you make as part of the first purchase.  There’s always rules on this and typically it’s an offer to give full purchase price against a purchase that’s at least double.  Read the fine print.  There are almost always also rules on having it inspected periodically for example and, obviously, it requires that the jeweler still be in business and that they have what you want for the second purchase.   In any case, this is evaluating the JEWELER, not the diamond.

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People buy ‘flawless’ diamonds for symbolic reasons.  I’m not quite as harsh as the other guys since the whole thing we’re talking about is a 100% symbolic purchase anyway, but the premise is correct that there is no visible difference between an IF and a VS1 and the price premium is considerable.  Whether that’s worth it is up to you.  It is to some people, which is why it carries a premium, but it’s decidedly unusual to aim for a top clarity and what most people would call a low range color.    Unlike high clarities, nearly everyone can see the difference between a G and an L, quickly and without tools.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Ok - I'm certainly not the expert here - you already heard from the experts. I do know that some people like flawless diamonds because they want their diamond to be as "pure" as their love for their betrothed. That said - purchasing  a flawless diamond with L color seems akin to buying a Rolls Royce but asking them leave out the air conditioning because you're on a budget. This is just my opinion. I personally would not pay for something I cannot see - and I have a good deal of difficulty telling the difference between a flawless diamond and one that is VS1. L color, however, I would think you could see that from across the room. Unless your intended prefers warm colors, you might want to keep the color better aligned with the quality. Have you asked her or found a way to figure out what she likes?

Edited by Gracetrump
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Thank you to both "Davidelevi" and "Denverappraiser" for the information you provided.

 

I guess i was grossly misinformed regarding value retention. My understanding was that a good diamond would hold its value.

Thank you for clearing that up for me.

"Holding value" is a bit vague; diamonds are unusual in that they take a big hit upfront, but don't lose much afterwards (except for changes in fashion, which do happen). It's also true that generally a good diamond will take a smaller % hit - not least because there is generally a smaller % of reseller profit margin in a "good" diamond - but the absolute amount you will lose may well be higher.

 

Some recent posts/discussion here: http://www.diamondreview.com/forum/topic/9705-hearts-and-arrows/#entry49692

Edited by davidelevi
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Part of the sales pitch for diamonds typically has a ‘value’ component.  It’s correct that the average cost of buying diamonds has gone up fairly steadily for the last several hundred years save for a blip back in the 80’s and some minor fluctuations from time to time.  It makes a great chart when plotted against, say, gold or hamburgers, and most people see no reason to expect it to change any time soon.  That’s not a gross deception; it’s just the correct answer to the wrong question.  People THINK it means that they can buy for X and when it comes time to sell it’s going to bring X plus some inflation factor.  It’s more like when you buy a new couch for X and when it comes time to sell you get a tiny fraction of what you paid.  Buying is easy.  Selling is hard.  On the scale of clothes, electronics, furniture food and nearly everything else you buy, diamonds ‘hold their value’ decently well but they’re NOT bank accounts.

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