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Igi Vs Gsi?


rosie_w1
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IGI is a huge company with several different labs that do not all use the same methodology.  That gets further complicated because they have lots of different products and they don't all use the same rules.  Some IGI reports are done on mounted stones, some include a value conclusion, some will grade stones in groups, etc.  Neither GIA nor AGS will do any of these things and SOME IGI labs refuse to do them as well.  

 

As a general rule, the onus is on the lab/grader/appraiser to convince you that their opinions have merit and the default answer is NO. 

Edited by denverappraiser
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Is there really any difference between International Gemological Institute's current grading practices and Gemological Science Internationals? I know AGS and GIA are more accurate and stones valued higher accordingly.  Just curious about IGI and GSI specifically.

 

Although I'm a newbie and not in the business,  I've never even heard of Gem Science Intl.  Has anyone?  I'n not being mean…just asking.

Edited by DLNOK
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DLNOK - three letter lab names are a penny a dozen, and what the three letters stand for is often misquoted. In the case of GSI I know at least one of those using those three letters, and it's a Canadian company going under the name of "Gem Scan International". The GSI that rosie_w1 is asking about seems to be a different company; if it makes you feel better, it's the first time I hear of it too.

 

rosie_w1 - I think you are starting from a common misconception: that AGS and GIA stones are "more expensive". Diamonds are priced according to what they are, not what a lab says they are (though GIA and AGS get a lot closer than others to calling shots in this respect). From this standpoint, the comparison between IGI and GSI (whoever they are) is a bit meaningless: first because as Neil points out there is a variety of "IGI labs" and they use different grading standards (and as far as I know the same may be true of GSI), and secondly because each diamond stands or falls on its own merits. GIA and AGS simply have more consistent standards and thus enable the buyer to narrow down the range of possibilities even before seeing the stone.

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When evaluating labs, start with NO.  If you've never heard of them, don't rely on them.  Anyone who wants to can call themselves a lab and there are plenty of small operations that offer excellent service but the fact that they can produce a laminated report is simply not evidence.  It's up to them to convince you that you should care what they think.  By the way, if you research them and find evidence that they're being deceptive, don't just hold it against the lab, hold it against the jeweler who is asking you to rely on them (this comment is not slamming GSI by the way, I'm speaking in general about gem labs and the whole business of 'certified' gems).  

Edited by denverappraiser
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  • 7 months later...

Do not know much about IGI, but I had a good experience with GSI. A while back, I had my eyes on this 2 ct. diamond ring, which had a GSI certification (graded  SI1). Didn't know much about GSI, but since I wanted to buy that rock, I looked it up online, inquired around about this gem lab. I discovered that these guys were quite accurate & reliable with their grading practices. I went ahead & did my purchase. I suggest you do the same. Plus, I haven't heard of any cases where they've indulged in over-grading. What can I say, I'm impressed with GSI.

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I've been in this industry, here in New York, for about 30 years and have never heard of the GSI.  Labs earn a reputation over time as reliable or less so.  I don't believe the GSI has earned a reputation yet so I personally would not rely on their grading.  As for the IGI, as Davide points out, it's not that they are cheaper than GIA and AGS graded stones, when comparing similar grades, the stones just don't measure up.  Simply put, if you take an IGI graded G-SI1 stone and submit the same stone to the GIA, the result will be a lower color and clarity possibly an I or J, SI2 or even I1.  I have not done this with the IGI so I cannot quantify it, but I have gone through this exercise with the EGL and have found up to five color grades and 2 clarity grades lower. 

 

Hope this helps.

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Volume wise IGI receives the second most number of stones for certification followed by HRD. AGS while an excellent grading authority, appears to serve a niche and a location (USA). Many stones cut in India do go to IGI. 

 

I won't be suprised if someone in Surat haven't heard of AGS and I can tell you with authority that they would have traded millions of dollars of diamonds. 

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I've been in this industry, here in New York, for about 30 years and have never heard of the GSI.  Labs earn a reputation over time as reliable or less so.  I don't believe the GSI has earned a reputation yet so I personally would not rely on their grading.  As for the IGI, as Davide points out, it's not that they are cheaper than GIA and AGS graded stones, when comparing similar grades, the stones just don't measure up.  Simply put, if you take an IGI graded G-SI1 stone and submit the same stone to the GIA, the result will be a lower color and clarity possibly an I or J, SI2 or even I1.  I have not done this with the IGI so I cannot quantify it, but I have gone through this exercise with the EGL and have found up to five color grades and 2 clarity grades lower. 

 

Hope this helps.

 

The trend is changing of recent. I have personally come across IGI graded stones that pair up well with same colored GIA graded stones. 

 

Edit: This is possibly the reason why spread between GIA and IGI discounts is shrinking of late. 

Edited by Furqan Shafi
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I think the issue is not the "individual" stone; yes, there are even individual EGL-Israel stones that are graded (at least on colour OR clarity if not both...) as GIA would grade them; the issue is on the reliability overall. 

 

This said, Furqan, you may well be right, and certainly quite a few other labs have tried tightening down on grading reliability (EGL USA for example), though I think there is still quite a way to go before reaching GIA/AGS/HRD standards (and even those are far from perfect, but in my opinion good enough for a consumer to take an informed decision).

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Lab grading is all about consistency, reliability, and standardization. If you lead the way in knowledge, and education you will be trusted by the public. If you’re interested in strictly monetizing your angle, you will have inconsistencies throughout. The buying public and industry will feel it, see it, hear about it, and hence proceed accordingly.

 

ie: Caution! B)



 

Edited by ronk15a
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  • 3 weeks later...

What normal standards? (GIA & AGS). Impossible! Why you ask? Any vendor that would get the same grade from GIA, AGS, HRD would not go to GSI. (regardless of the submission fee) Its that simple. There is only one reason to go with a 3 letter (lab) of no consequence. "a soft grade". Their grades mean little, POOPOO is POOPOO no matter if its brown or black. :D:lol::rolleyes:

Edited by ronk15a
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Our trained gemologists know a genuine stone—and we believe nothing is more beautiful. Screened for treatments and natural origin at every step of the process, we can tell if any gemstone is synthetic or has been treated. We give you peace of mind about the integrity of your gem.

 

 

After reading that: I would say NEXT. Sounds like a bunch of bozos....

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