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I'm Back, Ready To Purchase; Seeking Some Last Minute Advice.


BigPapi
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I have found the setting, I think

 

Please offer your opinion, advice and counsel before I purchase.  I'm guessing about the size.

 

Your Diamond:Very Good-cut, I-color, SI2-clarity, Cushion-Cut, 2.02-carat Diamond
Stock #: LD04544354 Your Setting:Trio Princess Cut Pave Diamond Engagement Ring in 14k White Gold (1/3 ct. tw.)
Stock #: 20370 Size: 8

$10,207 from Blue Nile.

 

 

 

 

post-127731-0-81984900-1406773031.jpg

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The issue is that with cushion cuts there is no way to know much about cut without seeing them. Blue Nile's "cut grade" isn't worth the digital ink it's displayed with.

 

Same - though in a sense a little easier to assess - for SI2 clarity. Will the inclusion show? When? Only way of telling is to see the diamond.

 

I would suggest you agree with them to get the diamond loose, get it seen by whoever you want to assess it, then send it back to them for setting. It may cost you an extra $100 for shipping, but it's a price I would be more than willing to pay.

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Thank you as always for your advice. I like the combination, but am sensitive about making an online purchase of this significance.

 

Regarding Blue nile, I read / heard they were one of the best.  Your statements seem to suggest otherwise.  What has been yourexperience ot that of your customers?  I'm just trying to understand.

 

Again Thanks.

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Blue Nile is a fine retailer; the issue is that they never - never - see the diamond.

 

It gets shipped from their supplier to you directly, and with cushions no lab provides adequate information to assess the quality of the cut; you need to see the stone or to have someone you trust to see it (yes, it can be the vendor, but if they in turn rely on their supplier... it starts being a bit remote for my liking).

 

Visibility of inclusions is somewhat less controversial - though you may judge as unacceptably apparent something that to me is invisible or vice versa.

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There is nothing wrong with Cushion; in fact it's my favourite shape, together with Asscher. However, you do require some assistance from the vendor or you need to be prepared to look at a few stones before you find the right one - the only shape for which there is some information on cut is Round (and the few Princess cuts that get an AGS report).

 

I would suggest that you take a look at vendors that provide at least some first-hand information on the stones they sell - whether it's in the form of photos, videos, reflector images or commentaries based on they calling in the stone and seeing it personally. This rules out Blue Nile, but it leaves in the likes of James Allen, Brian Gavin, B2C (on some stones), Whiteflash, GoodOldGold and quite a few others.

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Hi BigPapi,

 

I can't speak for Davide, but cushions and asschers offer a wonderful classic look.  There is no denying that modern (ideal) cut round stones are the most scintillating, but other shapes, including emerald cuts, offer a look that is timeless.  As there are no real proportion standards for these cuts, it is always advisable to see them live or at the very least in pictures.  If you can get any vendor you are working with to take comparison shots, you will at least have some inkling of how you stone might look compared to others.  In the attached image for example you can plainly see which of the two square emeralds (asschers) will be more lively.  Ultimately though, your choice of shape is one that is personal.

 

I hope this helps.

 

post-109884-0-42275500-1406829530_thumb.jpg

Edited by GeorgeDI
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Hi BigPapi,

 

I can't speak for Davide, but cushions and asschers offer a wonderful classic look.

You did... :) it's pretty much the reason why I like them, just as I like old-style features in a round (large culet, tall crown, small table). They may not be the brightest stones, but they have a charm that a "perfect" new cut does not match (in my opinion).

 

Thanks for the advice and counsel.  I appreciate it.  Looks like I ahve a lot more work to do to get this as right as it can be.

And then again maybe not... don't underestimate the help that a good vendor can provide.
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Any vendor who offers a money back guarantee is essentially doing exactly that.  It gets a little more complicated if the stone is set, both in terms of getting it independently evaluated and swapping for another stone.  For your own piece of mind, you can ask the vendor if they would send the loose diamond to an independent appraiser like Niel Beatty (who share a tremendous amount of good advice on this forum).  The appraiser could give you a report on the stone before you actually commit to purchasing it.  If you want the stone shipped to you, then you would have to purchase it outright but as long as you decide within the return period, you can inspect it before anything becomes finalized.

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Same story as cushion... with a little less variability in faceting pattern, but just by looking at a lab report, you know next to nothing about an emerald cut.

 

Girdle thickness: in general, avoid extremes (very/extremely thick/thin), but again sensible advice is "you can't tell just with the info on the report". If the "extreme" part represents only 5% of the girdle and it's not likely to be exposed, then who cares it's there...

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Not any more than buying anything else of the same price... you don't want to get stung, but you don't have enough information to make a confident purchase with your own knowledge only. The lab report only gets so far: you need to go out and see things in person.

 

Would you buy a car sight unseen just based on a manufacturer's brochure and official government mpg figures? Or a house, again sight unseen, based on the estate agent's floor plan and an energy efficiency certificate?

 

No. So why do you expect a diamond to be any different?

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I think you are in paralysis. And no amount of "analysis" is going to get you out of it, as long as the analysis is based on irrelevant analytics (if you are keen on a non-round, all a lab report tells you is size, colour and clarity, plus a few things useful to ID the diamond - nothing on whether it looks nice).

 

Back to the car simile: you would presumably head off to the nearest dealer, even though he/she may not be the one where you eventually buy the car, and at least take a look at things in person. If there is no dealer available on your neighbourhood, you might call a few that are sited further away and see how you get on with the sales people on the phone, before committing to a 3-hour-one-way trip - do the same here: call a few of the dealer, explain what you are after, ask them how they would help you make your choice, and see what happens.

 

If you call some of the people I mentioned above (all competitors of mine, BTW), and some of the lower-service dealers (such as Blue Nile) you'll probably understand the difference... and decide whether you are happy to continue with second-guessing (yourself and the stone), or using for a modest premium someone who actually has spent time and effort in documenting what they sell.

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