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Help With Determining A Round-Brilliant Diamond Choice


ajhollanddesigns
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Hello, I'm new here, as I'm shopping around for an engagement ring for my significant other of 5 years. I'm looking online at various reputable sellers for settings and, obviously, diamonds and have a question concerning fluorescence and such. I've done the research here and GIA's site and such but still can't really come to the conclusion of how much it will affect the look and why one sells less (although not much) than the other. Is this because of the fluorescence or the girdle or is it something else? Excuse my newbie-ness!

 

My budget for the full ring is about $3200-$3400. I am shopping on BlueNile as they have a setting that I know she wants, but can't find something close enough on any other vendor's site.

 

So if these were the two diamonds I was choosing from, could someone tell me which is more worth my money and how the "strong blue" fluorescence would affect this?

 

Thank you in advance!

 

Here is the comparison between the two:

post-134316-0-73657100-1402654872_thumb.png

 

Thank you again!

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My budget for the full ring is about $3200-$3400. I am shopping on BlueNile as they have a setting that I know she wants, but can't find something close enough on any other vendor's site.

 

So if these were the two diamonds I was choosing from, could someone tell me which is more worth my money and how the "strong blue" fluorescence would affect this?

 

 

1.  "Ideal" by Blue Nile is not "ideal" as referred to by the diamond industry, which refers to an AGS-0 grading.  What BN usually means is the stone could be considered in GIA's top cut ranking (although GIA would call it something else).

 

2.  Google Images for diamond fluorescence to see what very strong FL stones look like under different lighting conditions.  For example, in strong, clear daylight, your diamond will have almost a violet hue.  In the dark near a fluorescent source, the stone will actually glow (usually, bright blue).

 

I prefer VS fluorescence, and 3 of the 4 earring stones recently acquired (2014) have this characteristic.  It's not for everybody, and I would think carefully if putting in a ring setting instead of as earrings.

 

Sometimes you can find certain cuts discounted 10-15% because of a very strong fluorescent condition, under the theory that this interferes with the stone's clarity.  There has been a lot of discussion in this forum about it.  For high clarity grades like your VVS1, I would pay attention to see how the FL affects the stone you're looking at. (Ask before they ship you the stone.)

 

Pay close attention to the thickness of the girdle, since this is often dead weight you wind up paying for.

 

The setting (metal part, the actual ring itself) seems to trip up a lot of people.  This is usually the cheapest part of what you're buying.  If you post an image of what you're looking at, some of the jewelers here might be able to steer you to a similar (or better) setting.  Look at the catalogs by Stuller (stuller.com) to see typical pre-made settings available throughout the industry.

 

The two stones you've selected seem good choices within your budget, and they're fairly priced. Changing color or clarity is not going to give a significantly larger stone without the expense of a worse cut.

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Fluorescence  affects the price but it rarely affects the look of the stone in ordinary viewing conditions.  It’s the ‘rarely’ in that last sentence that’s the problem for online shoppers and what drives the price down.  Assuming you’re not one to spend a lot of time in the tanning salon or the disco, the only UV rich environment you encounter in your daily life is direct sunlight.  No shade.  No widows.  For people shopping ‘in person’, it’s easy enough to simply go look.  Online shoppers have to rely on the dealer.  The problem is a milky or cloudy appearance that kills the brightness.  It happens in something like 1% of the VSB’s.   That’s pretty low, but it’s not zero and the possibility is what makes people nervous.  It makes VSB’s hard to sell, and that drives down the price.  Some view that as an opportunity for a bargain, some view it as a risk that’s easily avoided.  It’s up to you.  The solution is pretty straightforward:
 

1) Buy from a dealer you trust, who actually has the stone, and have them go look at it in the sunlight before they ship.

 

2) Buy it and go look at it in the sun yourself while you’re still within the return period.

 

3) Shop locally.  Walk outside with the jeweler as part of the sales presentation.  Handy safety tip:  Notice the ‘with the jeweler’ part of that.  Taking the stone and heading for the door without permission can cause you a whole bunch of trouble that has nothing to do with fluorescence. :)

 

4) Put up with it.  A screaming blue fireball on your finger in the disco is actually sort of cool after all.  It’s only a defect if you decide it is and a cheaper price is a feature, not a problem.  Again, 99% of the time it has no affect at all.

Edited by denverappraiser
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