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Good Diamond To Buy?


Az0064
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Hey Pals, 

I was looking at the diamond below.  The only issue is the knot in the middle.  I have no experience looking at that but would it be noticeable to the naked eye?  

 

1.40 Carat Round

Cut: Excellent

Clarity: S1-2 

Florescence: None

Color: J

GIA certified.

 

http://www.bluenile.com/diamond-search?pt=setform&track=NavDiaSeaRD#diamonds_pid=LD04324491

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I don't understand why people are obsessed with the idea that the GIA report number is somehow an important thing to hide... and so end up cutting and scratching things off including - in your case - the legend of the plot which would have been useful to understand what one is seeing in the photo.

 

Anyway;

 

1. My guess is that this could well be eye-clean... and almost certainly not mind-clean (meaning you would always be second-guessing yourself as to whether you did or did not see the inclusions just right now). A lot depends on the "real" colour of the inclusions and on what happens once the stone is set.

 

2. If you remain below 1.50 you can get a stone that is probably the same size, cleaner and slightly better cut (I like high crowns, but not everybody does, and this one is a little steep, plus I'm not keen on the very broad "dim" centre) for the same price...

Edited by davidelevi
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What could be "wrong"? There is no way anyone can figure out anything about the diamond that is not already on the report... and a report copy is effectively a public document since it can be retrieved on the GIA site.

 

You can tell that the crown is steep(ish) because of the crown angle (or missing that, table %, crown height and a bit of trigonometry); a "classical ideal" crown should be around 34 - 35°. Does it matter? Not if you like it...

 

You are fishing very close to the bottom of the price pond... which with SI stones is seldom a good sign. Within a certain colour/clarity/cut/carat weight, the reason why diamonds are more/less expensive generally has to do with 1) inclusions being visible; 2) details of cut; 3) other issues with the stone (e.g. it looks muddy even though there are no visible inclusions). There are very very few bargains in diamonds.

Edited by davidelevi
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Lack of transparency is not necessarily caused by fluorescence (and if it is, it would only be apparent in UV-rich environments). Graining, strain and microscopic inclusions are all possible causes of lack of transparency.

 

On the budget split: it depends on what you (she) think is important... the ring, or the stone in it? There is no right answer, but if you do want to stay well over a carat $7000 isn't a lot, unfortunately.

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This stone is what is known as a "steep/deep" with crown angle at 36 degrees and total depth at 63%. Could be nice, could be a dud. The low pricing does reflect the measurements of the stone.

 

The coloration of the crystal knot is important; is it white or black/gray visible? Nice photo but no way to tell without consulting the Vendor who probably does not have it in-house since this is a "virtual diamond". Ask, they might be able to find out for you.

 

Insofar as marking out the Report #, GIA would definitely have an issue with you> if your intent was to prevent someone from being able to identify who lists this diamond, it probably is listed by several vendors at varying prices on this site's Search feature.

 

 

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Barry thanks for the advice. The knot is only in the first diamond not the second. The report and picture is for the second diamond only which only has the crystals. I can easily send another picture of the report. The report number is virtually scratched out not that it makes a different at this point. I also did see that two other places were selling it for 400 bucks cheaper so that is good to know

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For $400 less, you don't get a fancy cardboard shipping box -- you'll get a paper parcel.  You probably won't get pre-sales support like images (ASET, etc.) prior to shipping.  You might have an extended delay on getting your cash back if you have a returned item.  All of these things might still be worth it, for $400. :)

 

Try setting your search criteria for SI1 at a minimum, and keep the color low if that makes the price better for you.  Between a great 1.00 ct and a crummy 1.50, I'd suggest a color G SI1 in the 1.2 carat range.  Save your money on the setting -- this is something you can upgrade any time in the future, and might make a terrific future anniversary gift at 5 or 10 years, and in that amount of time you might want to make the ring more elaborate with side stones, etc.  (Or maybe she'll want to keep the simple ring untouched for sentimental reasons.  That's what my parents did.)

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Uhm... quite apart from the diamond size (the 1 carat in the CAD rendering seems OK to me), I think there are two other questions here:

 

1. Are you sure this meets her taste? It's a very elaborate design (and CAD renderings are often VERY far away from what you end up getting)

 

2. Have you already got the setting? Changing it to fit a different size centre may be challenging, given the detailing.

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For $400 less, you don't get a fancy cardboard shipping box -- you'll get a paper parcel.  You probably won't get pre-sales support like images (ASET, etc.) prior to shipping.  You might have an extended delay on getting your cash back if you have a returned item.  All of these things might still be worth it, for $400. :)

 

Try setting your search criteria for SI1 at a minimum, and keep the color low if that makes the price better for you.  Between a great 1.00 ct and a crummy 1.50, I'd suggest a color G SI1 in the 1.2 carat range.  Save your money on the setting -- this is something you can upgrade any time in the future, and might make a terrific future anniversary gift at 5 or 10 years, and in that amount of time you might want to make the ring more elaborate with side stones, etc.  (Or maybe she'll want to keep the simple ring untouched for sentimental reasons.  That's what my parents did.)

 

You really expect these vendors to give a stripped down price (mark up of one-hand single digits above their cost) and also supply all of these extra services by bringing in the diamond (s) at their additional cost?

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Insofar as marking out the Report #, GIA would definitely have an issue with you

Barry - am I right in assuming you meant "GIA would definitely NOT have an issue"?

 

If I'm wrong, please explain, because that is news to me... :)

 

 

GIA is known to be particular as to how their reports are presented.

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For $400 less, you don't get a fancy cardboard shipping box -- you'll get a paper parcel.  You probably won't get pre-sales support like images (ASET, etc.) prior to shipping.  You might have an extended delay on getting your cash back if you have a returned item.  All of these things might still be worth it, for $400. :) (...)

 

 

Barry >> You really expect these vendors to give a stripped down price (mark up of one-hand single digits above their cost) and also supply all of these extra services by bringing in the diamond (s) at their additional cost?

 

Hi Barry,

 

Actually, I think it's a fair trade-off.  Some of the recent threads here discuss how much (or little) worth images are -- actual, idealscope, HCA, whatever.  You really have to see the stone to make your decision.

 

I recently rejected one stone from B2C on 46th Street when I saw the Idealscope; it never even left the premises.  Then I realized that the special image I saw was a fancy color version of what was in the actual photo available in the online website.  I wasted a week asking the seller to jump through a concocted hoop, IOW.

 

So, when I ordered from B2C again, a week later -- and this time got the .90 Round, which I've now accepted -- I didn't bother asking for scoping.  I made sure the cut parameters were good.  My criteria for acceptance were that the stone was eye-clean, no glaring errors in the cut, and that it faced up nicely.  When it arrived, my wife and I agreed it was good enough for an earring.  (As well as being yet-another VS Blue.)

 

Because the girdle varies thin-to-slightly-thick, we're also thinking it might take a bezel mount, which might (also) give expanded license to the metalworker's vision of >> Pi <<.  (And, are we going to keep that cockamamie theme? :) )

 

Edited by jginnane
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