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3.5 Ct Trilliant Cut Diamond


Stuart
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I bought my wife a 3.5 carat Trilliant cut solitaire diamond ring.

 

The dimensions of the diamond are;

Length 10.25 mm

Width 10.20 mm

Depth 5.60 mm

The colour is assessed as H

The clarity is assessed as I1

 

The proportions are assessed as good, depth is 55.34% of the width and the table is 57.41%.

 

I have had this assessed by a gemmologist for insurance purposes.

I was led to believe that this was quite an unusual size for this cut of diamond, yet the valuation is somewhat short of what I had expected.

 

I have a valuation report.

I am looking for an opinion of what the stone would be estimated at for insurance purposes.

I am quite happy, if the general opinions of this forum is what I expect, to have a valuation carried out by another gemmologist.

 

Thanks guys.

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Yep, that's my opinion.  Your guy is correct that this is a pretty unusual stone but that doesn't really drive the price.  The insurance question is an estimate of what it would take to replace the item in the appropriate marketplace, which is usually a local specialty retailer. This would not be an easy item to replace if lost. That's not so much a gemological question as a matter of research.  If you think their research is bad, I would start by asking them to explain how they got to where they got.  

Edited by denverappraiser
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Even providing you with a guess is difficult. Trillions (or trilliants) are uncommon, large ones are even less common, and you have (been) provided pretty much zero data... How well is the stone cut? Who called it "H/I1"? How visible is (are) the inclusion(s)?

 

As Neil suggested, start by understanding how the appraiser you hired has come up with that valuation. You then have a few more elements to challenge either that or your own perception (possibly based on the price you paid - which may or may not have been "fair" to start with).

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How does this heart-shaped stone compare to your trilliant?

 

http://www.solomonbrothers.com/DiamondDetail.aspx?sku=68885HYF&affiliate=9318613A-AD0C-4530-A456-0409DFEFB8DE&utm_source=PriceScope

 

- slightly smaller

- yellower

- EGL grading

+ better clarity

+ more popular cut

 

= offered retail price $17,657

 

You won't find trillions (aka "Trilliants") on this Diamond Finder or at Pricescope, in this size.  Although not exactly comparable, the Heart cut at least has a few stones of this size, so you can sort-of extrapolate.  An ungraded-but-assessed stone is likely to be much lower in value than a GIA, AGS, or HRD graded stone, regardless of how correct the H/I1 assessment is. Perhaps $7-15K ungraded, versus ~15-30K with a GIA grading report.

Edited by jginnane
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An H/I1 3.50, even with a GIA grade, won't go for $30-45k... not even as a round. More like $15-20k as a fancy cut. And a "second tier lab" or "home graded" can be as low as $5k.

 

Here's a few roughly comparable pears:

 

http://www.diamondreview.com/diamonds/?sortOrder=price&sortDesc=1&fShape=Pear&fCaratLo=3.00&fCaratHi=5.00&fColorLo=H&fColorHi=J&fClarityLo=I1&fClarityHi=I1&fCutLo=&fCutHi=poor&fDepthLo=0.0&fDepthHi=100.0&fTableLo=0.0&fTableHi=100.0&fSymLo=&fSymHi=poor&fPolLo=&fPolHi=poor&fCulLo=&fCulHi=vlarge&fFlrLo=&fFlrHi=vstrong&fPriceLo=0&fPriceHi=1000000000&adv=1

 

The issue is not the "trillion" per se - it's the other variables.

Edited by davidelevi
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An H/I1 3.50, even with a GIA grade, won't go for $30-45k... not even as a round. More like $15-20k as a fancy cut. And a "second tier lab" or "home graded" can be as low as $5k.

 

Hi Davide,

 

I was editing my guesstimate down significantly, when you replied to the earlier post. (See: your post 11:25am; my edit appeared at 11:28am)   I think we're more in alignment now.

 

I would say -- whatever the official valuation is, tell 'em to suck it.  It's nice having a "fat" rock.  Just hope Stuart didn't seriously overpay, nor is he hoping to sell it back in the market anytime soon, nor is he relying on the grading report from my wholly-owned subsidiary, "XXY Gem-agical"..

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