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Please Help Me Rate This Aset Image. Thank You!


Newname123
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Hello, I am struggling choosing a diamond, and have finally came to one that I have put on hold. Please tell me what you think of this diamond, particularly the aset image. I would like a diamond that really shines :)

 

Princess Cut

1.65 ct

Colour I

Clairity VS1

Cut Ideal

Price $9000 USD

 

Depth 75.3%

Table 70.2%

Crown Angle 41.3

Pavilion Angle 40.4

Crown 11.8%

Measurements 6.41x6.36x4.79

Cutlet Pointed

Fluorescence Negligible

Girdle Medium to Slightly Thick

 

 

Any opinions are greatly appreciated and welcomed!

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post-134160-0-29772000-1396475303_thumb.png

Edited by Newname123
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The ASET looks fine. I'm not particularly keen on the windowed (black) areas, but at least they are distributed in a relatively symmetrical pattern and will provide some contrast. Is it "the best of the best cuts"? No. Is it much better cut than the average princess cut diamond? Yes.

 

For example, in my opinion, this is a significantly better ASET image (and most likely a better looking diamond). 

 

asetscope8001278069338TMBX97G8IizU56Y6dU

 

It's most likely not what you are looking for - as a 1.09 G/VVS1 -  but if you want to know what a good ASET looks like, here is one.

 

BTW - when you say that you want the diamond "to really shine", what do you mean? A well-silvered flat mirror shines a lot - it effectively reflects 100% of the light hitting it, but it's not a particularly interesting sight.

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I don't have much problem with it but, in the end, I'm not going to be one to answer the question.  I've got two customary questions that'll be important to others who want to wade in.

 

Who called it 'ideal'?

Who called it I/VS1?

Edited by denverappraiser
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For the price range, and to maximize size, would you purchase this diamond?

 

Or would you scale down the size and go for a better aset image?

To maximise apparent size I wouldn't start from a princess cut. (And I don't like them anyway, regardless of "size" consideration - but that's a matter of personal choice :))

 

"Your" diamond is a fine choice; it wouldn't be mine.

 

I would always favour cut over size - which incidentally does not just mean an ASET image.

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Sorry, I am not familiar with the term RAP, could you please explain?

 

Thank you for the insight, davidelevi. The one set parameter in this diamond "hunt" is it must be a princess cut. That is the only thing that my girlfriend has hinted at over the years. I made sure to maximize the cut before anything else, going for an ideal cut (from AGS), while whiteflash calls it "Super ideal" and "A cut above". From there I chose colour and clarity as low as possible while maintaining what would appear white to the eye and inclusion free. Next, I went to maximize size, and this is the stone I have ended up with. From what I have gathered here, it is not a popular pick due to the shape, however still a nice diamond. I am going to pull the trigger on this one later on today.

 

Thank you for all the help!

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How is a rough categorisation of ask trade prices relevant to a retail buyer?

I am not sure how rough is that categorization according to you but it has pretty much become the standard now and billions of dollars worth of diamonds are traded using the rapaport prices. 

 

How relevant is it to the retail buyer is up for debate and depends on the geographic location. From the part of world I belong customers insist on looking at rapaport prices and available discounts without realising other factors that drive the discounts. This has been one of the reasons in the past there was a heavy influx of IGI graded diamonds because everyone wanted a higher discount including retail customers especially in Asian countries.

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Sorry, I am not familiar with the term RAP, could you please explain?

 

Thank you for the insight, davidelevi. The one set parameter in this diamond "hunt" is it must be a princess cut. That is the only thing that my girlfriend has hinted at over the years. I made sure to maximize the cut before anything else, going for an ideal cut (from AGS), while whiteflash calls it "Super ideal" and "A cut above". From there I chose colour and clarity as low as possible while maintaining what would appear white to the eye and inclusion free. Next, I went to maximize size, and this is the stone I have ended up with. From what I have gathered here, it is not a popular pick due to the shape, however still a nice diamond. I am going to pull the trigger on this one later on today.

 

Thank you for all the help!

Good luck - let us know if you (and more important she) like what you get.

 

BTW - nothing at all wrong with the shape (or the stone - but you asked me what I would have picked), and your process for selection makes sense, except that you could easily go down to SI1 clarity and still get a very clean-looking stone for less money (or a larger one etc. for the same amount)

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How is a rough categorisation of ask trade prices relevant to a retail buyer?

I am not sure how rough is that categorization according to you but it has pretty much become the standard now and billions of dollars worth of diamonds are traded using the rapaport prices. 

 

How relevant is it to the retail buyer is up for debate and depends on the geographic location. From the part of world I belong customers insist on looking at rapaport prices and available discounts without realising other factors that drive the discounts. This has been one of the reasons in the past there was a heavy influx of IGI graded diamonds because everyone wanted a higher discount including retail customers especially in Asian countries.

As far as I know, not a single diamond is traded "according" to Rap prices. A lot of them are traded with reference to the Rap. Subtle difference perhaps, but still a relevant one. It's a bit like saying that used cars trade "according" to price guides published in the trade or specialist magazines. They don't. Merchants (and the public) will reference them, but every single deal is individual. It's completely different from the way in which commodities or stocks are traded - those are true liquid and fungible goods.

 

On the "rough" vs. fine - each to his own. This is what Rapaport themselves say about the price sheet:

 

The Rapaport price list is the primary source of diamond price information for the diamond trade and is commonly used by dealers as an approximate guideline for evaluating diamond prices. It is published online every midnight Thursday. The Price Lists quote the Rapaport opinion of high cash asking prices[.]

 

[...]

 

The Rapaport Price List does not provide transaction prices but rather price indications that may serve as a starting point for negotiations and a basis for estimating value for a broad range of diamond sizes and qualities.

(my emphasis)

 

We trade mainly stones U-Z and fancy colours in all shapes, but relatively few rounds and pears, so the Rap is irrelevant in that respect, but in any case with the amount of negotiation due to terms, shape, proportions, finish, fluorescence etc. I find the Rap to be about as valuable as a used car guide: good for orientation, but not much else. (And BTW, when's the last time you heard anyone buying 10 over? Everybody is getting something back - just like you never get the "guide" price when you trade in your car! ;))

 

"Asking" trade prices are not a good tool to understand what's going on in the market - particularly for a retail buyer, and your example of people effectively getting scammed is a perfectly good example of why. I think Asian (retail) buyers would be significantly better served by looking at online retail prices - ideally from dealers that trade in their countries, but if that is not possible, then US ones are pretty good enough: diamonds travel easily and cheaply.

 

@Newname123: hopefully this discussion clarifies a bit what the Rap (or Rap Sheet, or Rapaport Diamond Price List) is!

Edited by davidelevi
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That price is a 13% discount from RAP. Is that a price you would be happy with? 

 Here's the problem with Rap as a tool for identifying a 'deal'.  We'll take a sample search, say 1.30-1.39/G/SI1/round.  Rap is the same price per carat for every stone.  There are 221 stones in the database.  The asking prices range from $4,362 to $11,653.  Are we to conclude that the best 'deal' is the $4,400 one?   NO dealer who plans on remaining in business would make that mistake.

 

OK, so let's standardize the lab and throw in cut.  GIA/excellent.  120 stones.  The cheapest is $8,090 and there are about a dozen under $9k.  A half a dozen are over $11k and the balance are in between.  Rap is right at $10k.  The cheapest are R-20% retail and the most expensive are R+10%.  So are the $8k ones bargains and the $11k ones ripoffs?  What have you learned by knowing the 'discount' from Rap?

Edited by denverappraiser
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