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MillerMushroom

Looking To Buy A 2.50Ct. Gia/ags Round Brillaint

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Hi all, I'm looking for a Round Brilliant of approx. 2.5 carats, certified GIA or AGS, to be mounted in a Platinum ring.  Beyond these specs, how can one get the most for the least?  My thoughts were to get a H, SI2, and Excellent cut.  The cheapest prices I’m finding are about $24-27K (Blue Nile, Union diamond, etc.)

 

Are there any parameters, other than carat, that can be adjusted to lower this price without losing any visual appeal of the diamond?  I know that the large diamond and the platinum make lower color grades easier to see, but that the Round Brilliant shape also allows you to get away with a little more.

 

Lastly, if I select a diamond that I’m interesting in purchasing, how can I interpret the reports to immediately exclude particular diamonds?  For example, feathers, indentions, etc. and the locations of each are considerations when viewing the certificates.

 

Thanks, Larry

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"Getting the most" depends on what it is that you value most. For example I, personally, would much rather have a fantastically well cut 1.80 than a so-so 2.50. Lots of other people would go the other way. At any rate, staying below the 2.50 weight threshold should help you get a better looking stone for your money.

 

If I were you, with a large H/SI2 I'd be more concerned about the visibility of inclusions, rather than colour.

 

As to your last question - it depends on what you want to exclude. An SI-graded diamond will not have inclusions that present risk for the integrity of the stone, but there is no way of predicting from the report if the inclusions are visible. The plot is meant to help people find the inclusions and identify the stone, not to tell them whether they are visible with the naked eye.


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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I would have to say that MOST SI2’s in that size range are eye visible if you've got eagle eyes and you know what to look for.  That said, it’s not all that hard to cut the budget.  It’s just a matter of deciding what’s important and what isn’t.

 

Diamond pricing is based on the well known 4C’s.  The only real variable on that has to do with the problem that all but weight are matters of opinion, not fact.   Whose opinion is a big deal and they are not all the same.   Obviously you’ve already considered this but it’s always something to have in the back of your mind and it’s the heart of nearly every confusion diamond shoppers have.

 

There are also some ‘minor’ characteristics that can drive the price up or down.  This is things like fluorescence, ‘hearts and arrows’, brillianteering, etc.  Ignoring serious outliers, this sort of thing can drive up the price up or down by 10-20% or so from otherwise similar stones.

 

Lastly there’s marketing.  Some dealers charge more than others and offer more of a ‘value add’.  This can be everything from free shipping to convenient showrooms with free coffee or access to particular designers.  The list of possibilities is large and not everyone agrees on what’s valuable here.  I’m a big fan of shopping with your local stores and I would prefer to buy in that environment but exactly how much more I would be willing to pay is a matter of negotiation.  Not everyone agrees and these are not gemological properties.  Others would prefer to shop with a large specialty dealer that has a ton of choices to browse through and no need to talk to a salesperson at all.  Just click and buy.  Market selection adds a variable of as much as 50%  or more and ranges of 10-20% on the same goods is fairly typical. 

 

Where can you save some coin?  Start with deciding what you count as valuable in terms of non-gemological attributes.  Before you say ‘nothing’, consider a dealer where the terms and conditions are to wire your money to a PO box in Nigeria.  You can bet such a dealer would quote low low prices.   The property here is risk.  How about pawn shops?  They don’t usually have much in the way of selection and you usually have to be good at haggling but you CAN occasionally find pretty good prices there.   The attribute here is time (you have to show up and hunt and you have to know what you’re looking for).  Again, the list of options is large and there really is value here.    Where else?  Minor attributes can gain you a few percent.  Consider fluorescence for example.  The real stuff happens with the 4C’s.  Drop below 2.0 and you gain a lot.  Drop below I.  Drop to I-1.  Drop the cutting to ‘very good’ instead of excellent.  What are YOU willing to compromise?  How much are you hoping to cut? 


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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I wouldn't buy the cheapest one listed on sites like Blue Nile.  Had a client come in the other day and he bought the cheapest listed SI1 H on Blue nile and it was Horrible.  The stone looked like a SI2 instead of a SI1 and had a big black inclusion right in the middle.  The reason a stone is the cheapest listed is either it has a loose grade or the cut isn't very good or other reasons, otherwise they would all be the same price.


Jan

For those that want to know the truth about diamonds, just ask.

 

dbof.com

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You can get a great eye clean AGS ideal 2.23 ct. G color for that range though.

post-10-0-69275900-1365091524.jpg

Edited by jan

Jan

For those that want to know the truth about diamonds, just ask.

 

dbof.com

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