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Advice On Buying I1 Diamonds

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Dear diamond reviewers,

 

I was looking for a 1 carat diamond engagement ring and

I came across several vendors on the internet (namely on Ebay and other sites on the UK) who offered I1 diamonds on 14/18k gold rings. I am quite sure that they are diamonds and reviews/feedbacks have kind of confirmed this. Here are two that I'm interested in:

 

1.07 ct round

brilliant cut

6.70*6.72*4.10 mm

I1 clarity

color G

(on 14k gold ring)

700 pounds

 

$T2eC16F,!)kE9s4Z-UlsBQw7Ekjo,g~~60_12.JPG

 

 

1.17 ct round

brilliant cut

6.60*6.62*4.23 mm

I1 clarity

color H

(on 14k gold ring)

899 pounds

 

I did some research on the net and understood that the quality of the cut is a very important aspect and that info is missing. I have sent a message asking the vendor this piece of information. However, assuming that the cut quality is not good, would this still be a reasonable price?

 

(I'm looking for a 1 carat quite white included diamond that is as cheap as possible, is this worth it?)

 

thank you very much for your time i hope this is not too trivial :D

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There's a number of issues to consider here:

 

1. The fact that someone is calling a stone G or H, I1 or SI2 does not mean that it would be recognised as a G, H, I1 or SI2 by the standard setter (effectively GIA). If they sell it as G/I1, but GIA would call it J/I2, it changes nothing about the stone, but it does mean that (fair) price is significantly affected.

 

2. When you are looking at I clarity stones, cut may not be the only variable affecting sparkle and liveliness - and the photo you have posted seems to confirm that; a chunk off a coke bottle would be sparklier.

 

3. "Is it worth it?" I don't know. Most people buy a diamond ring because it's aesthetically pleasing and a good deal of the aesthetics revolve around reflection and refraction of light. Searching for a very low price, highly included stone means it's likely to have significant aesthetic drawbacks - whether coming from the inclusions, the cut quality, the colour or all three.

 

On price of the two rings you have found, we simply don't have enough data to come up with anything but a guess.

 

Let's assume that the ring and setting are about £150 on either. This leaves £550 (£750) including VAT for the stone, which is £450 (£625) net of VAT. In USD - which is what most diamonds are priced in, and you can find about half a million of them on the Diamond Finder - that's about $750-$1000. Can you find a one carat diamond, G-H/I1 for that money? No. The cheapest ones are around 2-3 times as much money; the good ones about 5-7 times as much. This tends to confirm my suspicion that the stones are graded "generously".

 

Does it make them a bad purchase? Perhaps not, but you are flying totally blind as to what you are buying, and I would question whether this is actually what you need to buy, even if it is correctly described (which we know it's not).

 

Frankly, if you have a budget constraint of staying below £1000 ($1400 net of taxes) and you must have a 1 carat stone, leave diamonds where they are at the moment. Get a nice solitaire setting with a CZ, put away £800 in a savings account towards a good quality diamond and be happy.

Edited by davidelevi

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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Thank you Davide for your feedback. I never had large diamonds so I have no idea how inclusions could affect that sparkliness (had in mind- oh it can't be thaat bad).

I do believe what you say is what is happening since the price range is rather absurd. I'm just really curious to how good (or bad) it could be! But I think I would settle for half a carat from blue nile or something. thanks again

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It can be veeery bad. And the worst type of "Joy killers" are the myriads of small specks that are visible in the photo.

 

Be careful with eBay advertisers: paying is easy, getting money back sometimes far less.

  • Like 1

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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I see a LOT of grading issues in the I1/I2/I3 range. The problem is that rather few people want to spring for the lab grading on that sort of goods since the cost of lab fees is a higher percentage of the cost of the stone and the whole point of buying in this range is to bring the price DOWN. The result is that nearly every I2 and I3 in the market is being sold as I1. The same thing happens with color descriptions of stones in that clarity range. An I3 being sold as I1 is already being seriously misrrepresented so what difference does it make if they call it a G instead of a J or an M? Lastly, they're harder to shop. A fairly standard practice is to look online to see what other similar stones cost but most of the well known online houses don't sell below I1 and those that do don't use labs so there's no easy basis for comparison. Lastly, the grade range is huge. I2 includes some decently pretty stones and it also includes some that look like a sugar cube. It's a much bigger range visually than if you were considering, say, VS, where they all look more or less the same without magnification.


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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Thank you for your reply.

Yes I am now more critical of their 'grading', but a person with a limited budget wants a tad bigger stone that's a pipe dream no more with those suspicious I1s. A closer inspection may reveal many inclusions but if they look good in the many pictures they provide should we give it a chance? I just searched that the most I could get with that money is half a carat with GIA cert. Which is kind of annoying but reassuring at the same time (it's more expensive but I could be more confident of what I will get). :) I don't want cz so that means delaying the proposal for another half a year if i have to get the GIA cert H SI1 stones.

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Your budget is fine and there's nothing wrong with I1's (or I2's for that matter) but you are relying heavilly on the dealer. That's ok, but this means that the FIRST step is to vet the dealer. Choose the dealer first and the diamond second and you'll find it goes much better. Going with the person who claims to provide the most for the least on a blind purchase often just leads to the biggest liar instead of the best deal.

 

How did you find the dealer we're talking about for example?


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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Well I went through Ebay and tried to find vendors with 100% positive feedback rating via www.toolhaus.org

I know that's kinda far-fetched since most buyers don't know what they're buying anyways, but it's a start, I looked throughthe feedbacks and found returns are hassle-free and that made me worry less. He also distinguishes between i1 2 and 3 (I guess he only sell I class diamonds), though that distinction and photographs alone can't accurately classify the diamonds into those categories. I know these stones might be worthless to people who are truly into diamonds but the person I'm giving it to has no idea what the 4Cs are or what diamonds actually look like. I just want it to be a pleasant (yet affordable) surprise. What do you think about these if you don't mind me asking:

 

1.I3 1.51 carat G colour

DSC01885.jpg

2. I1 1.01 carat G colour

DSC07230.jpg

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You don't need a one carat stone to propose. You don't even need a ring. There's hundreds of alternatives. One of which is to propose with the half carat, but to choose a vendor that allows you a 100% upgrade credit against another purchase.

 

Apart from that, it's not a question of the stones being worthless. £1000 is still a fair amount of money (or it is to me, anyway); the question is whether you are paying £1000 to get something that is available for £500 somewhere else, AND whether you would be better off spending £1000 to buy something else anyway.

 

Based on the photos, I'd never buy those diamonds for me (my wife). This is not snobbery - I have bought her I1 diamonds in the past, and have considered one or two I2 (one of which got snatched from in front of my open wallet, if you know what I mean). If you are confident that the vendor is going to return your money if you don't like them, why don't you give it a go?

 

The other question is: what does she expect? You seem to assume that she would be happy with a larger, not-very-clear but well cut diamond. Have you tested this hypothesis?


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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What classifies the stones into the various categories is the word of the grader, in this case the seller. The photographs are a way to demonstrate things to you but the grading itself was done with the stone in hand.

 

It's a good sign that they offer all 3 grades and your methodology is fine. I agree with Davide that if they've got a good return policy in place it's rather low risk to give it a try. Don't wait until the last moment so if you decide you do want to make a return it doesn't screw you up for an alternative plan.

 

Assuming she's at least reasonably aware of this plan, a way to get a feel for her taste is to go shopping. Leave the credit card at home and go visit some stores with her. Pay attention to what she likes. She's aware of your budget limitations and isn't going to target crazy expensive things and you'll get a feel for what she likes both in terms of the slze/clarity tradeoff as well as shape, ring styles and other things.


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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I wanted it to be a surprise so I don't want to disclose any hints of wanting to buy a ring which makes it even more difficult. But I will fully rethink this through as assuming those who are not into gemstones/diamonds have a default preference of size seems too irrational.

to Davide: I see your point.. I1s or I2s have a large range of variety and very few are nice to have. I'll keep this in mind.

to Denver: I have another order ready before the 'd-day', it's nothing dainty (0.51 ct round H SI1) so I don't think she'll be too surprised but I hope the meaning pulls through. :)

 

again thank you very much for your kind responses and time

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Dear diamond reviewers,

 

I was looking for a 1 carat diamond engagement ring and

I came across several vendors on the internet (namely on Ebay and other sites on the UK) who offered I1 diamonds on 14/18k gold rings. I am quite sure that they are diamonds and reviews/feedbacks have kind of confirmed this. Here are two that I'm interested in:

 

1.07 ct round

brilliant cut

6.70*6.72*4.10 mm

I1 clarity

color G

(on 14k gold ring)

700 pounds

 

$T2eC16F,!)kE9s4Z-UlsBQw7Ekjo,g~~60_12.JPG

 

 

1.17 ct round

brilliant cut

6.60*6.62*4.23 mm

I1 clarity

color H

(on 14k gold ring)

899 pounds

 

I did some research on the net and understood that the quality of the cut is a very important aspect and that info is missing. I have sent a message asking the vendor this piece of information. However, assuming that the cut quality is not good, would this still be a reasonable price?

 

(I'm looking for a 1 carat quite white included diamond that is as cheap as possible, is this worth it?)

 

thank you very much for your time i hope this is not too trivial :D

 

This photo you put up doesn't look like an I1 clarity grade that I've seen. I stick with stones that have a GIA or AGS lab report. The stones in your photo looks more like I3 clarity.


Jan

For those that want to know the truth about diamonds, just ask.

 

dbof.com

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Buyer beware;  I bought a .95 diamond on ebay sold as having an ideal cut, color H, SI2 clarity, with a lab report from EGL. 

I had the diamond viewed by a GIA trained jeweler and the diamond was more like: .95, M color, I2 clarity.  The cut was good, but not ideal.  Thankfully, the jeweler spent a lot of time, and effort to find the best possible setting to "up" the color and hide some inclusions with well placed prongs.  The ring looks, ok, but not "fabulous" as an H, ideal cut, S12 diamond should look.

 

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