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Diamond Cutting Laser Machine Vs. Diamond Cutting By Hand?


ronk15a
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I recently was introduced to a gentleman from India, who I will call "Charlie" he is an Indian diamond cutter who uses modern day equipment to cut diamonds such as the Quazer, DiaVision, and GIA Facetware by Sarin.

 

I was also recently introduced to a pair of Hasidic Jews on 47th St. who cut diamonds exclusively for a major dealer in NYC. They used a Sarin for proportion analysis only. Stones were examined by hand for cut or re-cut possibilities; there were two manual polishing wheels; One for each cutter. Everything appeared manual, nothing automated! One cutter was busy cutting, looking, cutting, looking (a hefty 5ct) stone.

 

Is it accurate to say that a potential "master cutter" is one who only works in a semi non-automated format? As opposed to diamonds cut by machines with little human talent/intervention. …What has been your overall experience with automated/non-automated as well as your thoughts on either formats in regards to cut quality, light performance, price, creativeness, and turnaround time.

Edited by ronk15a
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The best workmen tend to use the best tools. This extends well beyond diamond cutting by the way. There are important issues taht a sarin doesn't pick up but EVER high end cutter I know uses one or one of their competitors (they have several and Sarin is not generally considered the best). Proportion analysis is ALL it does. Lasers are good for sawing but they don't do proportion analysis. Planning is the key and although there are some fairly high end tools to assist with this, experience is what makes a master cutter a master.

 

Think of it like writers. Every good writer, and nearly everyone else, uses a word processor. That said, skill at MS Word isn't as easy as it looks at first glance. Most people never learn the subtlties but most good writers are actually pretty darned good at this too but this is NOT what makes them the best writers. Everyone now has photoshop and digital cameras, and most photographers are highly skilled at manipulatiing pixels, but that skill is not what makes a master photographer. The list of things like this is long. It applies to appraising and even trading diamonds. Anyone who wants to can set up a diamond selling website for pennies and become visible to the whole world but what makes Blue Nile Blue Nile is something else entirely. Anyone who wants to can use the above mentioned word processor to write documents that they call appraisals but that's not what makes an appraiser. Anyone who wants to can buy a Sarin machine or a laser saw and call themselves a 'master' cutter. If only it were so easy.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Um - I think Neil did answer rather directly, but I'll try to be even more direct.

 

I have never seen anyone cut a stone of some importance (say over 50 points) "automatically". They may use a lot of tools beyond a loupe, but the decisions are taken on the basis of human evaluation and experience.

 

All the other aspects you mention (price, creativity, cut quality, speed) are dependent on the mix of tools AND skill - sophisticated tools enable the cutter to get "better" results in one or all the aspects you mention, but without a human operating them the tools by themselves don't do much. And in my hands the best diamond cutting tools are unlikely to produce a good result.

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That's quite possible. But it has zippo to do with their use of tools or otherwise...

 

The Cullinan was cleaved (several times), but you cannot call the Cullinan stones badly cut. And I am still in two minds as to whether what Laurence Graff did (or had someone do) to the Wittelsbach was an improvement or murder, even though it was done with the best tools in the world.

Edited by davidelevi
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The 1.26 that we spoke about several weeks ago was cut by charlie, he called me and told me he got the stone down to a 1.03....I specified with him that I need the stone 1.01 or above larger table 55-58%, no culet, thin-med faceted girdle, remove the 2 chips....I'm picking it up in NYC in a few days; I'll let you know how it looks....

 

This will be my second job with this cutter. I said take your time/ he called me the next day and said the stone was finished. I don't know if this is good or bad. That's why I figured the re-cut, must have been automated/lasered.

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Most of the delay time at the cutter has to do with waiting in line behind other clients. It takes a bit of time to recut a stone but it's measured in hours, not weeks. The best cutters tend to be popular, especially if they charge low prices, and that tends to form a line. The guys you want to to business with will treat their other customers with the same respect you want them to treat you.

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Usually Laurence Graff does a pretty good job with his rocks!!! If you can increase the color, clarity, or overall value....why not cleave away.... :)

Because there is also something called historical value.

 

I'm looking forward to seeing the results. Did you take photos of the 1.26 prior to the recut?

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  • 5 months later...

In India Gujarat is known as the master in cutting business in the world. Cutting by the cutter machine is not the best way ti cutting diamonds but with hands we got it in accurate form that  we want... But now a days machines takes place of man. If you want to buy a laser cutting machine you have to visit at needham-ink in UK.

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