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Which One Would You Choose Out Of These Two?


jyeh74
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http://certs.rapnet.com/userfolders/14320%5CCerts%5CAM7009.JPG

 

http://certs.rapnet.com/userfolders/67100%5CCerts%5C5136241140.jpg

 

Do I trust the HCA? First one is 3.7 and second one is 2.3 Both above 2.0 but do I throw out the 3.7? What would cause it to score so low on the HCA (3.7)?

 

Will I notice the difference in size? They are relatively close in mm diameter.

 

Which one would you choose? Both have similiar inclusions.

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The HCA is not a useful way of subdividing GIAxxx's, and has never claimed it is.

 

Are these coming from the same source? Are they the same price? Are the terms and conditions the same? Have you seen either one? Has the seller?

 

Unless they're sitting right next to each other you will not notice a difference in size.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Some people on pricescope cannot even read the disclaimers on the HCA's page, never mind understand what it does... (or does not do)

 

Well, half that difference is weight: 2.28 to 2.40 is 5%, and 5% of $30k is $1500. The other half is other things: slightly better cut (maybe), margin, greater visibility of the inclusions (since you are looking at SI1).

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Assuming all else similiar, would anyone go for the 2.4ct?

 

So it sounds like you guys are not concerned that the 2.4 ct scored 3.7 vs the 2.28 ct that scored a 2.3

Dont trust the HCA.

 

My only concern is that I have asked for an Idealscope image but my retailer does not have the equipment, not sure if these suppliers do either.

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Idealscopes are virtually unheard of outside of the pricescope group of dealers so I'm not surprised your dealer doesn't have one. That said, they only cost $25 and are as easy as a loupe to use (in person, photographs can be a bit tricky). They really should consider picking one up. Saying they don't have the 'equipment' is a pretty lame excuse and means they don't understand what it is.

 

The online guys have a tougher problem. Usually they're selling stones they don't actually have. They're just brokering them on behalf of a 3rd party. They couldn't take a photo if they wanted to and asking suppliers to do this sort of thing has decidedly mixed results. Taking good pictures of diamonds is NOT particularly easy.

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ASET: http://www.americangemsociety.org/newhandheldaset

 

IS: http://www.ideal-scope.com/cart_order.asp (3/4 of the way down the page)

 

Yes, you can send it to an appraiser/expert of your choice (subject to agreement with the retailer, but they should be pretty used to this sort of thing) - whether that helps in deciding is a different matter.

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If you're going to use an outside evaluation service (like me for example), YOU should be the client, not the seller. Actually that's part of the point. You want someone without a vested interest in the deal. That said, lots of jewelers are pretty cooperative in terms of facilitating the logistics. Pick your appraiser using whatever criteria you like and then ask the dealer if they will cooperate. Usually they will.

 

Both tools are do it yourself things. They both operate on the same principle. $25 is the cost of the tool. The service is usually a fair amount more than that if you want someone to analyze it for you and/or to take photographs. I'm over $100 for this sort of thing for example.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Buying the DIY is cheap. But i dont have the expertise to determine. I know more red color is good and less black is preferred.

Thanks for the offer. Id like to find someone local to me in southern california. Orange county. This facilitates things so we may not have to ship. If there is someone local, that would be ideal.

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Idealscopes are a bit easier to interpret. There's a tutorial on their website about how to do it. Chances are good, by the way, that your neighborhood jeweler doesn't have experience with it either but it's not very difficult and a little bit of practice goes a long way. Make a deal with the jeweler. Buy one and go through the learning curve with him looking at both what you're considering and what he has in inventory. When you're done, he gets to keep the tool whether or not you buy a diamond from him. The next time a Pricescope person shows up in the store he'll be far better prepared to land the sale.

 

The tutorials about ASET are on the AGS website. www.ags.org

 

I use my ASET a lot more but mostly this has to do with the version I have is designed to give very consistent results (and didn't cost $25 by the way). In my world that's a hugely important topic. For a consumer who is only looking for a single stone it's far less of an issue.

 

Where in Southern California are you? I'll try to make a nearby referral.

Edited by denverappraiser
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