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I Have A Shallow Cut Round, But Its Not A "spread"


ronk15a
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My stone weighs 1.26ct and mm at 7.0 (average mm size) its a vintage cut (with no old world charm)! Is it accurate to say that all spreads are stones that mm out 10% more then they should? So for instance if this stone was a "spread" the (average mm size) should be 7.70mm making it look more like a 1.70ct. So clearly by the above example....Not all shallow cut stones are meant to be "spreads" Your thoughts....

 

So then I ask myself whats the point to cut a shallow-cut stone that's NOT "spready" ??? My only logical answer is at the time this stone was cut; good diamond cutters were rare.... and technology, knowledge, and skills were limited.

Edited by ronk15a
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The 1.26ct that I recently acquired; I’m interested in having it re-cut. It came into my inventory very cheaply. The stone is conservatively a K-L color and SI2-I1 clarity. The stone has all the signs of being an old cut; it has a small table, large culet, very thin girdle, and proportionally a shallow cut stone. I’m interested in having it cut to GIA Very Good-Excellent; and keeping it above 1.01ct

 

P.S. I want to increase the table size, polish out the 2 chips to the girdle, make a thin-med faceted girdle, no culet, re-shape to roughly ideal/ very fine parameters: Just a curiosity question do you think that a stone with these problems can be cut "Very Good-Excellent" with .25pts of play?

Edited by ronk15a
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1. In addition to improvements in skills and equipment, I think you should also count the fact that the ideas (never mind the parameters) for exploiting macles didn't exist.

 

2. You should ask a cutter who can see the stone. I would think it unlikely, considering the culet and shallow pavilion, but it's a pure guess. On the other hand, you may well be better off repairing the stone and selling it as an old cut, particularly if you cannot increase clarity considerably with the recut: a well cut 0.90 K/SI will not go for much. A nice 1.20 OEC/OMB could well go for more and the cutting fees will definitely be less.

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Recut yield on turning older cuts to modern ‘ideal’ cuts is generally driven by the girdle minimum diameter, the crown height, the overall depth, and the existing crown and pavilion angles. The importance of the 2 chips is going to depend on where they are and how far they extend into the stone. You’ve got none of this information, or at least you haven’t told us. Just guessing from what you’ve said, I suspect a shallow crown, a very low crown angle resulting in the small table and a deep pavilion that results in the weight. If this is the case, it won’t be a likely candidate for recut to a modern stone. A Sarin scan would be very helpful. An L/SI2/vg is not an easy item to sell for big money whether or not it's over or under a carat and if you're going to have to deeply discount it anyway, you might not want add money to it.

Edited by denverappraiser
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I think that after the re-cut it will be a K-L color SI1- VS2 as most of the significant blemishes are external: chips, bruises, graining, etc...I will have the stone run through my cutters Sarin and base my decision on what we see. In the end; I’m hoping for L/SI1 1.01 rapping out at $4,242.00 - I’m not really interested in the end value, as I am interested in seeing what my “cutter†can do with the stone. I will keep you posted on what transpires… Thanks again!

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If I decide to re-cut the stone the way I want to: "Modern" GIA: (VG-EX) What price level should I expect to pay based on what I have mentioned above, "Ball-Park"

'Generic' cutters range from $150 - about $250/carat precut weight. More if you need a rush job or your a one-off customer. A little less if you're a repeat good client and/or you have it done in volume and in a low wage country. Plus shipping/insurance, plus grading if you want to use a lab along with some more shipping/insurance. All in that's looking at $400 or more to rework a stone that may end up selling as low as $1000 depending on the details of the stone, how the cutting works out, and your own selling skills.

Edited by denverappraiser
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I recently had a 1.60ct princess cut re-shaped (small little chip)....and it cost me $90.00 per carat. Are the prices you mentioned because of all the work involved? Are these Colorado area regional prices?

Edited by ronk15a
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Repairs are cheaper than full recuts and not all tradesmen charge the same rates for their time and tallents. There aren't really very many cutters in Colorado but there's plenty of competition out there and FedEx offers a wonderful service to just about anywhere. It doesn't seem to cost too much extra for working with the guys in NYC if you like them and if you happen to live there you can save on the shipping and insurance expenses although local transportation can eat up that savings quickly. There's plenty to choose from so it shouldn't be hard to find one. If you've got one you're happy with that'll do a good job for you for $90/ct, go for it.

Edited by denverappraiser
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Thanks Neil. I'm thinking $450 on the full re-cut; Davide how much should I expect to pay on 47th St. for the full re-cut...from an above average diamond cutter. I recently was introduced, and refereed to "Sunshine" on 48th st. and they repaired a 1.60ct princess at $90 per carat. It came back a handsome, and sell-able 1.57ct.

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