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Darkfield/bright Microscope "gemolite Mark-V" To Identify Synthetic Hpht & Cvd What To Look For?


ronk15a
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I’m interested in finding out specifically what I can look for when looking at my darkfield/brightfield binocular microscope to help in the aiding or pre-screening process of synthetic diamonds. Specifically I know that some of the things I should look for in: HPHT & CVD are

 

“High saturation and darker tones of color, noticeable banded internal graining, the presence of metallic "slag" and altered inclusions with surrounding radial fractures†Any other signs???

 

Would anybody have any high resolution images depicting any of the above “synthetic characteristics†that you can send me for my research and study? Also if anybody out there is user savvy with their dark field/brightfield scope and have any tips on using it in regards to “identifying synthetic†I would greatly appreciate those tips. Thanks again for your help! It’s greatly appreciated!!!!

 

My recent experience: when looking at both cvd and hpht stones under the scope I have noticed that unless you have something to compare it to its just fascinating eye candy, nothing more. I was thinking of using 2 stone holders, (one on each side of the scope) and viewing hypothetically 2 similar shaped, sized, colored, clarity stones. One natural and one synthetic….your thoughts on this approach?

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Re: the last part - I think you'll find that

 

a. the field of view is likely not big enough to see one stone in its entirety, never mind two simultaneously.

 

b. if you have sufficient field of view, the magnification is likely not high enough to enable you to see the characteristics you are interested in.

 

c. depending on how your microscope is built, you may actually see an interesting jumble - interesting to a neurophysiologist, that is. Many "binocular" microscopes have a monocular lens whose rays are split through a prism into the "left" and "right" eyepiece paths, in which case you'll see only one stone anyway (or perhaps only the girdle edge of both), regardless of the field of view argument above. If you have a true binocular optical path, you may be able to see one stone with the left eye, and one with the right (subject to FoV and space distance between the lenses), but since typically in a microscope you see only the object under the lens (no context/location information), the brain has great difficulty in interpreting a different "left" and "right" image, and will try to merge them (or possibly you have one dominant eye, and that will take the lead).

 

As to the rest of your questions - I repeat the advice I gave you on responding to your first post on this forum: if you have doubts as to origin of stone or colour, use a reliable gemological lab. There is a reason why HPHT and synthetics in general are identified through the use of Raman IR and UV spectroscopy: it's difficult to do so reliably using other means.

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c. depending on how your microscope is built, you may actually see an interesting jumble - interesting to a neurophysiologist, that is. Many "binocular" microscopes have a monocular lens whose rays are split through a prism into the "left" and "right" eyepiece paths, in which case you'll see only one stone anyway (or perhaps only the girdle edge of both), regardless of the field of view argument above. If you have a true binocular optical path, you may be able to see one stone with the left eye, and one with the right (subject to FoV and space distance between the lenses), but since typically in a microscope you see only the object under the lens (no context/location information), the brain has great difficulty in interpreting a different "left" and "right" image, and will try to merge them (or possibly you have one dominant eye, and that will take the lead).

Davide,

 

I actually have one of these and I use it more than my true binocular scope. I love it. I've got a trinocular head on it and all 3 occulars are looking down the same light path. On the 3rd I've got a video camera so the client can watch what I'm seeing and, unlike a stereo scope, what they see on the screen is exactly the same as what I'm seeing rather than taking over one eye view.

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I see what you are saying :unsure:

 

Yes the field of view is not big enough to see the characteristics under high mag for (2) stones. That being said; would anybody have any high resolution images depicting “synthetic characteristics†as mentioned above.

Edited by ronk15a
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BTW: Over the last few months I have learned a great deal about synthetic diamonds: I like the SSEF type 2 diamond spotter, and my portable UV light SW/LW is Awesome....the only tool I have right now in my “synthetic identification arsenal†that is more fascinating then effective is my scope which I have illustrated above.

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b. if you have sufficient field of view, the magnification is likely not high enough to enable you to see the characteristics you are interested in.....David or Neil any suggestions?????

 

Other then "use a reliable gemological lab" - Not trying to be ill-mannered. Davide

Edited by ronk15a
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Don't worry; you are not ill mannered, but the fact is that there are certain things that - at least with current scientific and technological knowledge - cannot be done with "simpler" methods.

 

It's a bit like repairing or tuning cars - up to a point, you can get by with a spanner set, screwdrivers, pliers and files. At some point - pretty soon with modern engines and electrical systems - you need a full blown diagnostic interface software that can "talk" to the computers in the car and figure out what is going on.Trying to fix or even diagnose a modern engine management system or climate control unit without the proper tools is just impossible. You may be lucky and find the faulty (electronic) part with trial and error replacement, but it works one time in ten (if that) and it is just not economical.

 

To your more specific question - I think the issue is that your idea of "eye-to-eye" comparison under a microscope just doesn't work. You may use two identical holders, position them identically using some reference/gauge/frame on the base of the microscope and swap them more quickly than re-setting everything every time (it's a pretty standard technique in biology), but other than that I don't know what to suggest.

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I understand Davide. Although I would love to see "synthetic characteristics" under the scope, via high resolution jpg images. Unfortunately as far as i can see; there not available to the public. I would imagine that only labs have them in there archival database.

Edited by ronk15a
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I have no idea whether GIA would share images from this in higher resolution/size than they are available in the book, but starting to get the book may be a first step..

 

http://www.amazon.com/Gems-Gemology-Review-Synthetic-Diamonds/dp/0873110501/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1343889504&sr=1-1

Edited by davidelevi
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