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countrysoul4

Is My Ring Real?

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Hello there. Thank you for replying to my posting. I am new here and dont totally know how to manuver around the site yet and or apparently post pictures correctly because one of them didnt upload.

 

I was asking about this ring because the ring has many rainbow reflections on it, a lot of sparkles out in the sun, all colors of the rainbow. I am worried that it is not real. I will try to upload a photo of it which shows somewhat of what I am talking about. You can see the colors from all angles just about. The ring on the inside does however say 14 KT and does have the jewelers stamp in it which is JST. Thank you for your time and helping me! I appreciate it greatly! :)

 

Ok, maybe I am doing this wrong but when I finished writing this I went to go post an image and well I cant find the attach button......oh my how do I do this?

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There's no way to identify diamonds or the karatage of metal from a photograph so I'm not going to be able to tell what you want anyway but I'll be happy to look at your picture.

 

My account looks a little different from yours because I've been around for a while but the 'attach files' place is under the 'more reply options' button on the posting screen.

post-109418-0-53297100-1343258522_thumb.jpg

Edited by denverappraiser

Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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Oh, thank you, thank you. Okay, I understand now.

The carats I'm not worried about it is actually just the diamonds I'm worried about. They sparkle rainbows in the stones out in light. I should just bring it somewhere. Does a jewerler charge to check someones ring?

 

Thank you for your time!

 

Also, if they are real, does it mean that they are very cheap stones and quality? I just want to at least have gotten my money worth.

Edited by countrysoul4

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I charge. That's part of how I make my living.

 

Others will give a certain amount of 'free' advice, especially if they have the opportunity to try and sell you a pair of earrings to match. Often free advice is worth what you pay for it so I would be cautious about getting into grading questions but it's not difficult to tell the difference between diamonds and the common substitutes and most jewelers are pleased to show off that they can do it.

Edited by denverappraiser

Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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Also, if they are real, does it mean that they are very cheap stones and quality? I just want to at least have gotten my money worth.

The way to do that is to get it appraised, by a real appraiser who can inspect it in person. Yes, expect to be charged for this service. Identifying if they're diamonds or not isn't even 10% of your question (unless the answer is no I suppose).


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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The only reason why I put the video on was so one can see what I am talking about regarding the rainbow reflections I see on/in the ring. Did I do something wrong with posting that? If so, please let me know.

Thank you for your time.

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You didn't do anything wrong at all, and the video is perfectly visible.

 

The problem is that it doesn't help to answer even the most basic of your questions (is what you have a diamond?), never mind the more complex one (how much is it worth?). The only way to get an answer to the second one is to have the stone properly identified, graded and appraised by a competent professional(s).

 

For the first one, most jewellers should be able to tell you if it is a diamond pretty quickly and reliably, but they will need to have the ring in their hands - no-one can tell you what it is based on a video or photos (and CZ is often good enough to trick even relatively expert observers having the stone in hand, if they aren't careful).


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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Hi countrysoul4,

 

I'm afraid it's virtually impossible to tell if a diamond is real just from photos. There are a few tests that you could perform on an unmounted diamond but even then, it's not a very reliable way of appraising a stone.

 

Ideally however, a real diamond wouldn't reflect 'rainbow colors' or if it was diamond it might be a low grade one. You wouldn't happen to have a certificate for the ring would you? Having a certificate of authenticity is another way to tell if the stone on the ring is a real diamond or not.

 

You also said the stone is set on a 14K ring. That is a good sign as a real diamond won't be likely to be set on a low grade metal. JST would be the hallmark or the makers mark. I'm not that familiar with JST but if it's in your area you could probably contact them and ask them if the ring is theirs and if it's real.

 

Bottomline however, the only way to truly find out is to have it appraised by an expert in person.

Edited by ssussman

Know more about diamonds on Brilliance.com

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No, you didn't do anything wrong. It's just not possible to do what you want.

 

From time to time I teach appraisal theory at one of the local colleges and one of the lessons involves showing the students a picture of an apple and asking them what it is an what we might be able to tell about it. That leads into a discussion of whether it's a Granny Smith, Fuji or whatever, whether it seems to be healthy and how much apples cost at the local store during the current season. It's usually about 5 minutes into the discussion before someone notices that we're not talking about an apple at all, we're talking about a picture of an apple. That's a TOTALLY different thing!


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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I didn't know that Magritte was an appraiser trainer: ;)

2013_CKS_01103_0104_000(rene_magritte_ceci_nest_pas_une_pomme).jpgIncidentally, this painting was sold in 2013 for nearly GBP 3 million, so it's not as if an appraisal discussion on it as a painting has no interest.

Edited by davidelevi
replaced image that didn't show; added info about sale

Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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I didn't know that's who's idea I was using although I'll now be sure to give proper credit. I may even show that image as the one to talk about. You must admit, it fits and it leads well to the issue of making sure you are answering the right question.


Neil Beaty

GG(GIA) ICGA(AGS) NAJA

 

There's never a crowd when you go that extra mile.

Professional Appraisals in Denver

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Entirely agreed. Magritte also painted this one, if you feel that an apple is too healthy and natural, or you just feel like changing image every now and then

 

magrittepipe.jpg


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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ok, that's a pretty enough picture of a ring. What does it have to do with you?

 

Lol

 

Thought this quote from Davide was interesting and may be relevant here (I came across it once when I was trying to figure out the different characteristics of brightness, fire and scintillation in a diamond):

 

"Diamond has a relatively high dispersion among gems, at 0.044; for comparison, glass or quartz is somewhere around 0.010-0.015 and lead crystal (Svarowski) is somewhere around 0.041. Some simulants introduced in the 1950s/1960s (strontium titanate, synthetic rutile) have much higher DI, at 0.190 and 0.280 respectively - and they positively burst with fire, to the point that they can be immediately identified as "fakes", whereas CZ (DI 0.066) requires more careful study."

 

From this post:

 

http://www.diamondreview.com/forum/topic/7189-reflections-from-ring/

 

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On 7/25/2012 at 7:04 PM, countrysoul4 said:

Hello there. Thank you for replying to my posting. I am new here and dont totally know how to manuver around the site yet and or apparently post pictures correctly because one of them didnt upload.

 

I was asking about this ring because the ring has many rainbow reflections on it, a lot of sparkles out in the sun, all colors of the rainbow. I am worried that it is not real. I will try to upload a photo of it which shows somewhat of what I am talking about. You can see the colors from all angles just about. The ring on the inside does however say 14 KT and does have the jewelers stamp in it which is JST. Thank you for your time and helping me! I appreciate it greatly! :)

 

Ok, maybe I am doing this wrong but when I finished writing this I went to go post an image and well I cant find the attach button......oh my how do I do this?

JST can mean a David Yerman ring. Beware of knock offs though. I have a David Yerman 14K JST P and I purchased it new. It is a chocolate and white diamond cluster ring. Pawn shops can sometimes answer this for you but beware of them as well. Recommend a local private jeweler to take a look. 

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4 hours ago, Toni Kulick-Green said:

Hope this helps 

It does; I didn't know that David Yurman use(d) a mark "JSP" - though to be precise it's probably a contractor's mark, which may mean it could be used on pieces made for others too ("knock offs" of DY designs or not)

I'm not sure it helps the OP in any way: she/he has not been visiting the site for about 8 years...

Welcome to DiamondReview in any case!


Davide - Specialised Consumer Information and Assistance,
Diamonds by Lauren (http://www.diamondsbylauren.com)
davide@diamondsbylauren.com

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