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Should I Buy This 0.73Ct. Gia / Vs1 / G Princess Cut?


ytka98
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Laser Inscription Registry .................. GIA

Shape and Cutting Style ...... Square Modified Brilliant

Measurements............................ 4.95 x 4.88 x 3.43 mm

 

Carat Weight ............................................... 0.73 carat

Color Grade .............................................................. G

Clarity Grade.......................................................... VS1

 

Clarity Characteristics .......................................... Cloud Finish

Polish ........................................................ Very Good

Symmetry .................................................. Very Good

Fluorescence ........................................................ None

Table ........................................................ 71%

Depth ........................................................ 70.3%

Girdle ........................................................ Medium - Thick

Price........................................................ $2,100

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Hm. There are about 150 comparables listed here... at prices varying from about $1700 to about $3500. The one you picked is closer to the bottom of the pile - the question is why? Most likely the cut isn't commercially great, but would you like it? How did you pick it?

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Aside from the 4 Cs, I used the most common/basic characteristics an untrained individual can utilize to make an education decision about purchasing a diamond (table, depth, polish, symmetry, etc). I saw the stone and could not find any inclusion, so I had the jeweler find them for me and I still couldn't see them. I'm ok w/the color and weight, as well. At this point, I'm not sure what more I can do to make a more informed decision?

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Inclusions are not the point; with a VS1, I'm not surprised you had difficulty in finding them, but they don't have any influence over the most important aspect of a diamond: its cut. And table, depth, symmetry and polish have a minor influence (or rather are the result of cut quality decisions taken rather independently of them) - the reason why they are on the report is that they are easily measurable and can be used (table and depth) in identification of the diamond, not because they are particularly relevant in assessing the diamond's quality.

 

Did you compare the diamond with other princess cuts of similar size but of different cut quality - for example AGS-000 graded stones? Do you still find yourself coming back to this one? If so, go ahead.

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I guess when I look at different quality stones, they all look very similar to me, I've had retailers give me 4 diamonds, with colors E-G, clarity VS1-SI1, various polishes, symmetry etc. I'm having a hard time saying yes, this one is it because to my untrained eye, they all look "shiny".

 

Here's another question, if the stone is GIA certified, can it be a man made stone? or better question, will GIA certify man made stones?

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D to E to F is probably one of the hardest grading calls to make for a professional, so don't feel bad about not being able to see it.

 

If you can't see the difference between cut qualities, it's OK too - but since you are talking to a vendor that has them in front of you, ask him/her to point the differences out. At the end of the day, the call on "value" is completely personal, and if you can't see a difference there is in my opinion little point in paying for it.

 

BTW - It's not what is graded, it's the extent to which the diamond sparkles, reflects and refracts ("rainbow" sparkles) light that matters, and this is not graded, but at least in broad terms it is pretty easy to see.

 

If you go to

http://vimeo.com/channels/thediamondschannel

there's quite a few good "cut comparison videos", and Jon is a pretty good teacher (or salesman? ;)) in pointing out what you "should" see and what you should not.

Edited by davidelevi
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Thanks for the vids! So if 2 stones at the same size have the same GIA rating but the locations of the inclusions are different between the 2 and cut quality is not rated (princess cut), is it correct to say that the diamond has more fire and sparkle is more valuable with better cut quality? How much does fire and sparkle out weigh distribution of brightness and contrast not under spot light? What type of light should one bring into a store to shine on the diamond and what type of background? (where does one purchase the holder for the loose diamonds he's using?) What is he doing differently in the vids to show the difference in sparkle versus fire? Spot light type and location?

Edited by primetime
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In general yes - although with clarity VS and higher the impact of inclusion visibility on price is practically zero (very very few VS2 have inclusions that are barely visible without a loupe, and they go for a discount): all you pay for with higher clarity is rarity. For cut, using your base parameters of Princess/0.7x/G/VS1, there is a factor of 2 between a "well cut" stone and a so-so one.

 

I don't think you should take any particular kind of lighting in the store - not least because it would look rather unusual if you turned up with a diamond grading lamp... However, do try to see the diamond in different lighting environments: under the spotlights, in an office/backroom with fluorescent lighting, in natural light (next to the window or - if the merchant lets you - outside).

 

The difference in the videos is purely light type: diffused fluorescent for showing brightness (and to some extent sparkle), and halogen or LED spotlights for fire (and another type of sparkle).

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I wouldn't take in a diamond light but it's amazing how having some of your own tools serves as a clue to the employees at stores that you're serious as a shopper. Something as simple as having your own loupe (and knowing how to use it) does it but if you really want to look the look, just happen to have an idealscope in your purse. They'll get the clue immediately.

 

Special note. DON'T take your own tweezers or comparison samples. It's that your's aren't better but stores are extremely sensitive about controling things because of the risk of theft by shoppers.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Aside from the 4 Cs, I used the most common/basic characteristics an untrained individual can utilize to make an education decision about purchasing a diamond (table, depth, polish, symmetry, etc). I saw the stone and could not find any inclusion, so I had the jeweler find them for me and I still couldn't see them. I'm ok w/the color and weight, as well. At this point, I'm not sure what more I can do to make a more informed decision?

 

If you saw the stone in person and liked it, then you made a good choice. The price is right.

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