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Is This Ring Good To Buy For The Price? Need Help Asap


tigeorgy
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I need feedback ASAP to make my final decision. For $8,500, the rock (loose) is a Jubilant Crown (74 facets). Is it a good one based on the information from EGL-USA report:

Shape/Cutting Style: round

Carat: 1.55

Clarity: SI3

Color: F

Depth:63.8%

Table:45%

Crown Height: 14.9%

Pavilion Depth: 43.8%

Polish: Very Good

Symmetry: Good

Fluorescence: Faint

Brilliance/Contrast/Radiance: All are excellent

 

Please provide me with your feedback as I am new to this and do not want to get ripped off. I look forward to reading your feedback.

Edited by tigeorgy
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I went to the store to look at a couple of diamonds for an engagement ring and the sales rep. offered the jubilant crown since it is "more" brilliant than a conventional diamond. He compared the EGL certified jubilant crown (74 facets) with a GIA certified conventional round diamond (58 facets) and I saw the jubilant brilliance to be better than the other one. Note: The jubilant crown was also cheaper than the GIA certified conventional diamond.

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You haven't done a fair test. I'm not opposed to the extra facet style designs but they're decidedly more difficult to shop and I wouldn't dive into one just because the salesperson pitched it. For example, in the diamond finder at the top of the page are ads for 22 EGL graded 'conventional' round brilliants (the ones with 57 facets) between 1.51-1.56/F/SI3 and all but one is cheaper than that. Most by thousands of dollars and a few are less than half. Buy what you love, and if you love the extra facet designs shop them against other similar designs, not some different design that's graded by a different lab using different standards. Lots of stores sell 'em although they tend to give them different names and they're hard to find online to use as shopping tools. You're paying a premium for the facet pattern and the salesperson is telling you it's a discount.

 

FWIW, extra facets do NOT make a stone more brilliant. That comes from the lighting and the angles in the stone that cause the reflections. What they do is break the light into smaller pieces and there are more of them. Some people like it and some people don't but it's not 'better' in any scientific sort of way.

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Hi,

 

I just had a look at their diamond catalogue, the 'GIA' certificates look strange to me...

 

http://www.jewellerycatalogue.co.uk/certificated_diamonds/gia_graded_diamonds/19983353.php

 

Are they just old? Or am I missing something obvious? All of their diamonds seem to come with this certificate.

 

Regards,

 

Al

Edited by Always learning
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What you are seeing on the site is a "simulated" GIA report, which contains some strange information like "width deviation" that makes no sense at all.

 

You can check that any report that the vendor presents is genuine by using the report checking facility here http://www.gia.edu/reportcheck/

 

you will need the report number and the weight of the stone.

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You haven't done a fair test. I'm not opposed to the extra facet style designs but they're decidedly more difficult to shop and I wouldn't dive into one just because the salesperson pitched it. For example, in the diamond finder at the top of the page are ads for 22 EGL graded 'conventional' round brilliants (the ones with 57 facets) between 1.51-1.56/F/SI3 and all but one is cheaper than that. Most by thousands of dollars and a few are less than half. Buy what you love, and if you love the extra facet designs shop them against other similar designs, not some different design that's graded by a different lab using different standards. Lots of stores sell 'em although they tend to give them different names and they're hard to find online to use as shopping tools. You're paying a premium for the facet pattern and the salesperson is telling you it's a discount.

 

FWIW, extra facets do NOT make a stone more brilliant. That comes from the lighting and the angles in the stone that cause the reflections. What they do is break the light into smaller pieces and there are more of them. Some people like it and some people don't but it's not 'better' in any scientific sort of way.

 

 

 

I took you advice and compared it with other diamonds. I always go back to the one I mentioned (jubilant crown). I also inquired on how the vendor priced the diamond, they use rapaport as a guide. It appears the diamond could sell for a lot more. I do want to buy the diamond and was wondering if $8,500 is a good price for such diamond (1.55 ct, color F, clarity:SI3).

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Rapaport is not relevant to you (in fact, it is quickly becoming relevant to nobody, but this is another matter). It reports average prices for diamonds of a given weight, colour and clarity irrespective of many other characteristics, including important ones such as the lab providing the grading information. The fact that your diamond trades above or below the average of "similarly" graded diamonds may be interesting in theory, but it has nothing to do with whether you are being asked a fair price for it.

 

Prices for comparable stones are not easy to find - there are about 30 listed on the diamond finder here for prices between $9000 and $4000 - clearly visibility of the inclusions is paramount in determining the price level. Does this mean that yours is at the top of the pile? Possibly - but a lot more information would be needed to determine it.

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Davide,

 

I don't see a single Jubilant Crown listed here. In fact, I don't see a single stone of any of the 'extra facet' varieties listed. Comparing certs to other types of stones is no more fair than using heart shapes for comps. That's great if what you want is a heart, they're usually cheaper, but it's irrelevant if it's not.

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Mmmm - you have a point, however the rough cost for a 1.5x round shape is what it is quite irrespective of the faceting, and it's a major part of the cost of the polished stone. It's not quite an unfair comparison as one to a heart or pear where the cost of the rough is about half as much.

 

But yes, I should have said "There are about 30 round brilliant cut 1.5x F/SI3 listed which are the closest if not good comparable".

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I understand, and I"m certainly not picking on you. The specialty cut people charge extra for their work. What they pay for the rough isn't so important. They charge what they charge and the shopper can buy it or not as they wish. Whether or not that premium is 'worth' it is an entirely different issue and boils down to one of taste.

 

In practice by the way, the yield on the specialty stones is usually better than with more standard cuts because they tend to have huge depth and even belly's on the stones. They deliberately conceal the REAL cut data (angles on the pavilion and crown in particular) with the mantra of how the facet count is the important thing in evaluating cutting. Even if you choose one of the specialty cuts it's hard to shop one against another because they won't provide the data. They just insist that they're all exactly the same at superb, even if it takes no more than a side by side comparison with 2 of the branded stones in the same store to notice that there are differences. A lot of these seem to come in just over the critical weights like 1.0x for exactly this reason. The cutter chose to make it this way instead of cutting to 'ideal' specs and getting a 0.9x from the same piece of rough.

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