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Wanted - Princess Cut 1.9Ct+


Readytoboard
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Be aware that GIA does not grade cut in princess cut diamonds. Any cut grade you will be told is the dealer's own judgement - which may be perfectly OK or it may not be. Ask the dealer how they came to the conclusion on cut and what evidence do they offer to support it, then decide whether it is to be trusted.

 

Using the specs you have given, there are over 5000 diamonds that match advertised on DiamondReview's Diamond Finder: http://www.diamondreview.com/diamonds/?qShape=Prin&qCaratLo=1.9&qCaratHi=150&qColorLo=D&qColorHi=J&qClarityLo=1&qClarityHi=7&pg=&qSort=Price. They go from just under $5k to over $250k, so you may want to narrow things a bit... e.g. with an approximate budget.

 

Good luck!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Where are you located?

 

GIA does grade princess diamonds and here is link to GIA report of one

 

https://myapps.gia.e...391&weight=1.71

I think what we have here is a failure to communicate. Davide is in Switzerland, and they do things differently over there, but GIA is still GIA, they have no Swiss office, and they don't assign a cut grade to princess cuts. The link you provided demonstrates this. There is no cut grade there.

Edited by denverappraiser
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  • 4 weeks later...

hello there

let me try that , any idea over here from anyone , about creating lab diamond using HPHT or CVD technology .

well every dream must start somewhere .

assuming money issue is not an issue , any ideas?

serious talks at najinasro@hotmail.com.

 

thanks a good luck on ur princess if u did not buy it yet let me know .

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@Najinasro - not sure what you are looking for:

 

1) A partner with the technology or capital to open a business in manufacturing synthetic diamonds?

 

2) A place where to buy a CVD or HPHT created diamond?

 

If the latter, this list although nearly 4 years old is still valid:

 

http://www.diamondreview.com/forum/topic/4339-where-to-buy-synthetic-diamonds/

 

Diamond Nexus Labs also sells synthetic diamonds, though their marketing leaves something to be desired...

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thanks for replying , all i am searching for is some one that knows the technology and able to find the machinary to produce

 

man made diamonds using HPHT or CVD process .

 

i will make the investment all i need is a some one that knows all the answers about manufacturing and producing man made

 

diamond .

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All of the manufacturs that I know of make their own equipment and they count the details of the tools to be closely held trade secrets. I would even expect that the 'tools to make the tools' are proprietary.

 

Why is this part of a discussion on Readytobaord's princess cut?

Edited by denverappraiser
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  • 4 weeks later...

GIA calls a princess diamond a "Square Modified"..

True enough. 'Princess' is a trade name, rather like frisbee, kleenex, coke, or elsewhere in the diamond business, radiant cut and Tiffany settings. The generic term is square brilliant, square modified brilliant, rectangular modified brilliant, etc.

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Which is strange because GIA set the standards of grading. So people like us in the industry refer to a princess as Square Mod, yet other grading agencies and jewelers call them princess..

You would think it would have changed to the actual correct name of Square Mod.

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Which is strange because GIA set the standards of grading. So people like us in the industry refer to a princess as Square Mod, yet other grading agencies and jewelers call them princess..

You would think it would have changed to the actual correct name of Square Mod.

Which is strange because GIA set the standards of grading. So people like us in the industry refer to a princess as Square Mod, yet other grading agencies and jewelers call them princess..

You would think it would have changed to the actual correct name of Square Mod.

'rectangular modifed brilliant' just doesn't roll off the tongue all that well'. It's kind of like calling a Coke a 'cola beverage'. It's correct, and I would expect an analyzing lab to use terms like that in a report about the various attributes, but it just doesn't work in the real world.

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  • 7 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I am trying to sell a princess-cut diamond, 1.55 ct, G color, VSl, GIA certification with GIA Cert # lazered on diamond itself and corresponding report with diagram of location of any and all flaws on the diamond, along with stone measurements. The corners on my stone are cut, so there are no squared corners, so the diamond cannot be damaged, as those with squared corners are more easily damaged when mounting and mounting removal. GIA grading report lists under: shape and cutting style "cut-cornered square modified brilliant". Hope this information helps you.

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Thank you, David is it? I appreciate your comments, as I am a novice to selling diamonds. I used to only buy them. Any assistance is greatly appreciated. I was warned not to give out the cert number inadvertently, by a retired diamond appraiser-seller. For what reason, it is not apparent to me. The cert number is lazered on the diamond itself. Would you be so kind as to clarifywhy I was warned of this?

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Hi there, yes, it's Davide.

 

Ask this retired appraiser. I'd be interested to know what they come up with. It seems to be a relatively widespread misconception that somehow the report number is confidential or reserved - nothing further from the truth (why would all major labs provide free report verification services online, otherwise?).

 

There is no reason whatsoever not to provide the report number if you own the diamond and you are trying to sell it. There is no link between you or your address and the report, particularly if you got the diamond with the report from a dealer: even in GIA's accounting system, the name linked to the report is the dealer's (or the cutter's), not yours. And GIA's accounting records are not public anyway.

 

If you are in the trade, and you intend to purchase the diamond yourself, it's not wise to alert competition to the fact that you are interested in that particular stone. Nor is it in your immediate interest to enable consumers to "price shop" you. See here for a recent story on what can happen: in this case, the dealer "won" (?), but there are plenty of other cases where dealers take a smaller margin than they otherwise would have in order to keep the sale.

 

Even in these cases, the need for "secrecy" is limited to when someone does not own the stone outright, and is counterbalanced by the need to let potential buyers know what you are selling. For example, I suspect what you are selling is not at all a princess cut - even though I may be wrong (and I am not implying any intention to deceive). It's most likely what is known as a "radiant", which is a different style of cut. Seeing the plot on the report would solve the question: a princess cut plot looks like this:

 

r1236cert.jpg

 

Whereas I suspect that the plot on your diamond looks much more like this:

 

r4854cert_zps88fe5ec3.jpg

 

As a potential buyer (I'm not - but I could be), I want to know what I may be buying, and I want to know that I'm not wasting my time. At the moment, I only have your word that what you sell even has a GIA report... on the Diamond Finder database there's over 100 ads for 1.50-1.75 GIA G/VS1 princess cut diamonds (+50 for radiants), all of which have a link to the GIA report, and about half of which are priced less than your stone. All come from reputable dealers that accept credit cards, have money back guarantees, provide me with a choice of diamonds and offer services to set the diamond into a ring or whatever other piece of jewellery. You do none of the above. Why do I - hypothetical potential buyer - even want to talk to you?

Edited by davidelevi
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The classic reason to avoid passing out the report number is for sellers who are selling the stone on behalf of a 3rd party on a non-excllusive basis. It prevents the buyer from using the cert number to compare the stone against other people who are selling exactly the same stone for less. If you own the stone, or at least are the only person selling it, it's no problem. If it's a decently recent report it's also very helpful for the potential buyer to be able to look it up on the labs website and a way of confirming that the report you have is the same as the one they produced (its an anti-counterfieting issue)

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