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Your Thoughts...gia V. Egl


alor112
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Good Evening,

 

I've enjoyed reading many of the posts on this board and have my own "dilemma". I have my engagement ring search down to three and can not figure out which one is giving me the best value. Please see the specs below and let me know what you guys think.

 

Ring #1 1.5k F Color SI1 Clarity EGL Certified $12k

 

Ring #2: 1.2k G Color VS1 Clarity GIA Certified $11k

 

Ring #3: 1.23k E Color SI1 Clarity GIA Certified $10k

 

I put a deposit down on Ring 1 but now after reading posts on the EGL grading system I have my doubts and am leaning towards Ring #2. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Edited by alor112
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Alor, welcome.

 

The issue with EGL is not the grading system - as far as I know, they use mostly the same grading scales as GIA - it's the unreliability of the results. That F-SI1 could be a J-I1, or it could be an F-SI1. Or anything in between. There's nothing intrinsically wrong with an EGL-graded stone, but you need your own expert to tell you more about it than you would with a GIA or AGS-graded stone.

 

In terms of "value" - it all depends on your definition of value. Since the EGL stone is 1.50, you are paying a premium just for that, although there will not be that much of a difference visually in face-up size (and possibly none at all depending on proportions) among the three stones. The 1.20 GIA is high clarity - but you may not need that: there are many SI stones that are eye-clean. The 1.23 GIA is high colour - but it may contain eye-visible inclusions.

 

To this, we need to add the question of cut - which is likely to trump colour, clarity and size... and on which we have no information. Presumably, you have seen these stones. Is there one that you liked more? The EGL one? Why?

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Alor, welcome.

 

The issue with EGL is not the grading system - as far as I know, they use mostly the same grading scales as GIA - it's the unreliability of the results. That F-SI1 could be a J-I1, or it could be an F-SI1. Or anything in between. There's nothing intrinsically wrong with an EGL-graded stone, but you need your own expert to tell you more about it than you would with a GIA or AGS-graded stone.

 

In terms of "value" - it all depends on your definition of value. Since the EGL stone is 1.50, you are paying a premium just for that, although there will not be that much of a difference visually in face-up size (and possibly none at all depending on proportions) among the three stones. The 1.20 GIA is high clarity - but you may not need that: there are many SI stones that are eye-clean. The 1.23 GIA is high colour - but it may contain eye-visible inclusions.

 

To this, we need to add the question of cut - which is likely to trump colour, clarity and size... and on which we have no information. Presumably, you have seen these stones. Is there one that you liked more? The EGL one? Why?

 

They are all round brilliant cuts and to be honest to my untrained eye they all look the same except size. I am concerned with paying more for a diamond when there may be variability in the Grading system.

 

From what I've learned to this point clarity is important in a round brilliant cut because there are more light paths into the diamond. I have to decide on a tradeoff between color and clarity because rings #2 and #3 offset in that one is 2 steps higher in clarity, but 2 steps down in colour. Thanks again for your time.

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I agree with Davide that the EGL pedigree is a deal killer for #1 unless you're prepared to get something else to back up the grading so let’s talk about the other 2. It is not correct that clarity affects the number of light paths into a diamond. The optics and the light return on a diamond is about cutting with a tiny nod to transparency. Although it’s true that clarity sometimes affects transparency, this is more of an issue in the I1-I2 range than it is in the sorts of stones you’re considering. The difference between a VS1 and an SI1 in terms of light behavior is not likely to be significant.

 

You mention that these have been GIA graded. Do you know any of the other details from the grading report? In particular, all round GIA stones graded since 2006 contain a Cut grade that can be useful. There is also other data on the report that may be helpful as well and you can look it up on the GIA website at reportcheck.gia.edu if you know the weight and report number. If you can give us the numbers, the gurus here may be able to tell you something helpful. (or not :angry: )

 

You describe these as ‘rings’ and not ‘stones’. Are they already mounted?

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Of the EGL labs, and there are several separate entities, EGL-NY is the most accurate, in our experience.

 

You're still best off going with GIA unless the Vendor/Jeweler has the EGL graded diamond in-house and can verify the color/clarity. Otherwise you're likely to be paying more money for less diamond.

 

If you're buying from an on-line Vendor I would also go a step further and request measurements of light performance as "numbers" alone will not necessarily tell you anything of value regarding face up light performance such as dispersion and sparkle.

 

Tools to measure light performance are the idealscope, ASET scope, and Brilliancescope. While there are published reservation of each individually, taken together they do give you an indication of the diamonds face up light refraction and provide you with information that just the "numbers" cannot do.

 

ETA: 'provide'

Edited by barry
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HI all!

I disagree with Barry about the use of EGL. it's a long slippery slope.

Be it EGL NY - which I agree is better than many of the foreign EGL's- or LA, or Tel Aviv, or Mumbai.

The bottom line is that dealers don't accept an F/SI1 grade from EGL, and those that advocate buying such stones without educating the consumer are generally doing some "funky" stuff.

If it was a 1.50 for $6k, the grade issue becomes far less important to get exactly right.

It's still incumbent upon the seller of such a stone to educate the buyer about the gem lab, but it's far more acceptable to buy a $6,000 1.50ct diamond sans the GIA.

 

 

I agree with what davide wrote-there's nothing intrinsically wrong with a diamond simply because it has an EGL report.

In fact, we carry some stones that visited EGL before we bought them from the cutter.

These are all in the category of "affordable" qualities.

We rarely agree with the EGL grade- and in fact always publish our own grades, as opposed to those on the EGl report. But we will provide the EGL if the client requests in these cases.

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David,

 

I did qualify my statement about EGL graded labs in that it is best for the Vendor-Jeweler to review the diamond for color - clarity.

 

"You're still best off going with GIA unless the Vendor/Jeweler has the EGL graded diamond in-house and can verify the color/clarity. Otherwise you're likely to be paying more money for less diamond".

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