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Is Stong Flourescence Ins G Si2 Stone Bad Or Good? Does This Stone Look Ok?


cathyb
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This diamond is 2.23 and offered by one of the onlines stores. The price is under $9000 so that concerns me. Is the Flouresence deal killer. Does this stone look good? It is EGL USA so I am concerned clarity will be off. Any help would be appreciated!

 

Shape: RoundCut: PremiumCarat: 2.23Color: HClarity:

SI2

 

Measurements: Depth Percentage: 59.4 %Table Percentage: 59 %Girdle: TNCulet: None (Pointed)Polish: Very Good Good

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Fluorescence is the last thing I would worry about with this stone. In small (<5 ct) round near-colourless diamonds sold loose on the internet, you are very very unlikely to find any real deals - the market is too transparent and competitive for that. If someone is pricing a 2.23 ct H/SI2 stone at $9000, you can be sure that it's not a "great" stone by any account.

 

On the other hand, it may be something you quite like, and most internet vendors offer pretty generous return periods.

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Fluorescence is a negative in less than half of 1 per cent. Read the best study ever done on the effects of fluorescence on a diamonds face up transparency here:

 

http://www.gia.edu/pdfs/W97_fluoresce.pdf

 

The bigger concern is the accuracy of the color/clarity grading on the EGL diamond. You may be paying more money for less diamond. I would stick with GIA and AGS lab grading reports.

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Fluorescence is a negative in less than half of 1 per cent. Read the best study ever done on the effects of fluorescence on a diamonds face up transparency here:

 

http://www.gia.edu/pdfs/W97_fluoresce.pdf

 

The bigger concern is the accuracy of the color/clarity grading on the EGL diamond. You may be paying more money for less diamond. I would stick with GIA and AGS lab grading reports.

 

 

typical rule for fluorescence is that diamonds exhibiting STRONG blue fluorescence with very high color and clarity (Fl-VVS2 and D-F) causes diamonds to appear oily and should be discounted up to 5%. However, diamonds with STRONG blue fluorescence and color/clarity in the Si1 Si2 and KL range actually helps the diamond and can have an additional up to 2% value. In this diamond probably will have no affect whatsoever. I too would be weary of any EGL cert. Always ask yourself, why didn't it go through GIA or AGS.

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Ring tutor;

 

What you say is total BS. Read the very comprehensive GIA study, specifically their results of SB in the higher colors.

 

BTW, how many strong blue diamonds have you examined?

Edited by barry
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byw, i have viewed hundreds of strong bf diamonds, as a diamond instructor at GIA! and u have examined just how many??? as for your "total BS" comment, i wrote that this is a general rule affecting price!!! if you look at any rapaport pricing guide you will notice the trade does in fact change its price according to fluorescence.even the new GIA study comments on this!

Ring tutor;

 

What you say is total BS. Read the very comprehensive GIA study, specifically their results of SB in the higher colors.

 

BTW, how many strong blue diamonds have you examined?

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Hum - excuse me, but I agree with Barry. You didn't just say something about a general rule affecting price. You said

 

typical rule for fluorescence is that diamonds exhibiting STRONG blue fluorescence with very high color and clarity (Fl-VVS2 and D-F) causes diamonds to appear oily and should be discounted up to 5%
[my emphasis]

 

If you are a "diamond instructor" - whatever that is - surely you should be aware of a study done by GIA more than 10 years ago that flatly contradicts your statement? We all agree that strong fluor in high colour diamonds is generally associated to a discount, but no one here has been talking about the effect of the fluor on price.

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Ring; This is exactly what you said:

 

typical rule for fluorescence is that diamonds exhibiting STRONG blue fluorescence with very high color and clarity (Fl-VVS2 and D-F) causes diamonds to appear oily and should be discounted up to 5%.

 

There is no such "typical rule" which GIA makes very clear in their excellent 1998 study.

 

If you're indeed a GIA trained instructor, they should can your a-- out the door and take their diploma back.

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Ring,

 

As a GIA instructor you surely know that pricing is NOT part of the GIA curriculum and that the Rapaport Diamond Report is specifically NOT one of the resources used in the various lessons. This is not an oversight. GIA teaches gemology, not valuation science. What things ‘should’ cost and why is considerably outside of their realm. You have broadly overreached in your statement that this is a ‘general rule’ and even farther by attributing it to GIA. Even your statement of gemological fact is false. SOME strongly fluorescent stones exhibit an oily appearance in certain lighting environments, especially direct sunlight but most don’t (and those that do are usually discounted far more than 5% in the marketplace).

 

Neil

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