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Some Diamonds With No Lab Reports


ForceofWill
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I've been looking for an engagement ring for some time now. Mostly online, but I stopped by a local place tonight. I was there for a little while and they seem to really know their stuff. But when I was asking about some different diamonds and whether they had GIA reports on them, she said that she didn't know if that particular one did. She said that some of their diamonds have GIA reports but some of them have no report at all. She then told me that a GIA report isn't that important because the ring will be appraised anyway and insurance companies won't take GIA reports anyway. But my question is, without a report or anything, how do I know that the diamond I would be buying is actually a .77 F VVS2, and how do you know what the symmetry, polish, overall cut grading are? They say Ideal cut, but GIA only lists to Excellent, and without a report on it, will the appraisal tell all that information?

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How you know is by blind faith in their anonymous grader. She said so. You need to decide if that's sufficient for your needs. Personally, I recommend against.

 

The same holds true of your appraiser by the way. Different appraisers provide different information and they are decidedly not equal in terms of skills, tools, reporting and ethics.

 

She's correct that a GIA grading report does not fulfill the requirements for an insurance policy, nor is insurance the primary purpose of having one.

 

Neil

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Yeah, that's pretty much what I was thinking. I'm gonna go back and see if they have a GIA report for this one stone I like. It's really the only one there, in the range I wanted, that's priced reasonably, and only because they say it's 50% off right now because of the sale. But 50% off of what, What they appraise it at. And no way for me to tell if it doesn't have a report with it.

 

Thanks Neil

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You should definitely insist that they send the diamond to GIA for a grading report. The report will provide the most accurate information on the diamond. GIA is non-profit and is only concerned with interest of the consumer. Go back and tell them, its the only way to make sure that what your getting is a quality diamond.

Best of luck!

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It's so difficult to trust jewelers! I have been shopping around for a diamond, and after dealing with a couple misleading jewelers I decided to take my research online. The first website I was lead to was the GIA website. Which helped educate me on diamonds and the 4 C's. I feel that GIA is a non-profit organization and they are trusted by the U.S. government. It can't hurt to have a GIA certified diamond.

It's really the only one there, in the range I wanted, that's priced reasonably, and only because they say it's 50% off right now because of the sale. But 50% off of what,

 

Sounds like a red flag

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If the diamond is as they describe, they should have no qualms or reservations in sending it to GIA for a grading report.

 

Protect and assure yourself that you're paying for what they say you're getting.

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I do feel that generally, it's a waste of time trying to buy a diamond, to have the dealer send it to GIA.

.

 

Even if they don't agree to it, and most won't, the question itself is of value. It pins down their confidence in their own choice of graders.

 

There are several reasons for dealers to avoid GIA grading.

 

1) Speed

2) Grading accuracy and grading scales (they want a lab that will assign a higher sounding grade, that uses the SI3 clarity grade or that uses a cut grading scale that's more inclusive).

3) Cost

4) Avoiding the grading scale entirely, especially the cut grading scale.

 

Naturally, salespeople will point at #3 on that list and ignore all other choices. In practice that's the least likely one listed although with certain stones, especially in the lower price points it becomes important.

 

Neil

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