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How Much Would This Diamond Cost At Tiffanys?


zhongni1984
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Hi all!

 

How much would such a stone cost in a Tiffany Setting at Tiffanys?

 

Carat: 0.60

Color: E

Clarity: VS1

H&A

 

Certified by GIA or AGS

 

I'm deciding between getting the e.ring at Tiffanys and a private jeweller. The private jeweller told me that I might have to pay up to 2 - 3 times the price at Tiffanys for the same rock and I just wanted to make sure.

 

Thanks in advance!

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I'm not sure what Tiffany;s would charge.

There's no question it's possible to buy similar merchandise as Tiffany sells for less money- BUT- some people feel the "Little Blue Box" is worth it.

You could counter his assertion by bringing up the fact that whatever you'll pay in a brick and mortar store is generally more than you'll pay from an aggressive internet seller - but the same situation exists. Just like some people are willing to spend for the Blue Box, other people are willing to pay more for the privilege of buying in a B&M store as opposed to online.

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Tiffany's doesn't use AGS lab at all, they don't use GIA on stones that small and none of the 3 (Tifs, GIA, AGS) use the term H&A but, that said, I'm sure they will be thrilled give you a price if you show up and ask. It varies quite a lot depending on which setting you choose. They have quite a few choices and they take the position that it's not the gemological properties of their diamonds that make their jewelry special.

 

Comparing prices with superficially similar offers at Tiffany's as evidence of a bargain is a silly exercise. It's no more evidence than the price of a hot dog at the ballpark is evidence of a bargain at 7-11. If you want to shop price, and by all means you should, it's not difficult to do. Shop with comparable dealers selling comparable stones. The big internet houses with national reach like the folks who advertise here under the 'find online jeweler' button at the top of the page is a good place to start. Every local jeweler I know will give free estimates if you ask.

 

Neil

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Why don't you just call Tiffany's, give them your criteria and ask them to call you back ASAP with a ballpark figure? It definitely is not 2-3 times the price, if what you have been given is honest information. There be the crux of the matter. Buying things sight unseeen from people you have not real idea about.

 

Me? I want to see a jeweler face-to-face and see what I am getting, BEFORE I pays 'da money, honey.

 

Yes, Tiffany may cost more than your Inet jeweler. But who do you go to for fixing the bent prong? Who is going to inspect, clean, and make periodic adjustment/corrections for you on the spot? Do you trust morea company that is in almost every city in the U.S. and has been around for decades or the guy who sprouted up a few years ago and exists no where except in a cyberspace world?

 

Sorry, call me old-fashioned. I may buy a book or CD on-line, but I will buy my jewelry, after I have inspected it, thank you very much.

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Happy to oblige J't'aime. Old fashioned. There you go! :P

 

BTW - many "online" jewellers exist only as a channel of "brick and mortar" jewellers, not dissimilar to the fact that you can buy from Tiffany online. And most online dealers allow generous "sale or return" periods.

 

In terms of "value for money" - sorry, but I don't buy the equation of "service", inspection (for what? treat well made jewellery with respect, and it will last way more than your lifetime) and adjustment = value. However, chacun à son gôut, and there are plenty of people for whom the assurance provided by the name is worth a lot.

Edited by davidelevi
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Happy to oblige J't'aime. Old fashioned. There you go! :P

 

BTW - many "online" jewellers exist only as a channel of "brick and mortar" jewellers, not dissimilar to the fact that you can buy from Tiffany online. And most online dealers allow generous "sale or return" periods.

 

In terms of "value for money" - sorry, but I don't buy the equation of "service", inspection (for what? treat well made jewellery with respect, and it will last way more than your lifetime) and adjustment = value. However, chacun à son gôut, and there are plenty of people for whom the assurance provided by the name is worth a lot.

Old Fashioned, here. And not impressed or persuaded. You may be able to buy Tiffany's online, but if I have a problem, I am going to the "brick and mortar" Tiffany's for satisfaction. Incidently, Tiffany advises be verry careful about buying even there jewelry online. As there are countless counterfeiters and scoundrels on the Inet, they insist you buy ONLY at Tiffany.com.

 

I don't know about any 'generous sale or return periods' You'll need to be more specific. All I know are the horror stories about 'bait and switch' tactics and fraudulent practices that Inet jewelers apparently practice with great abandon and relative impunity.

 

And excuse me, but I don't know of anyone in the real world who does not need occasion service on both jewelry and fine quality time pieces. What part of the universe did you say you were from where things don't break or are accidently damaged?? In the often misquoted, famous words of an American patriot... "I know not course of action others may take, but as for me, give me service, or give me jewelry from the Inet (death)!!" ;)

Edited by J'taimeCartier
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J'taime,

 

As much as I enjoy your poetic license, I disagree with pretty much every one of your points.

 

‘Internet’ is not a place where you can buy jewelry, or anything else. It’s a medium that allows individual merchants to communicate with their customers. This includes Tiffany.com. It’s no more reasonable to blanketly disparage Internet jewelers than it is to disparage those who do business over the phone by blaming it on the phone company. It’s the character of the people behind the counter/keyboard that is paramount, not their means of advertising.

 

‘Service’ is not a concept that is limited to Tiffany. For starters, there are high quality jewelers all over the world who proudly offer top quality service on merchandise that they didn’t sell. There are manufactures who offer superb warranties on their goods as well as retailers, including some who advertise online, who will go over backward to support their clients. Actually, Tiffany isn’t even all that good in this regard. Although they do nice work, they are slow and extraordinarily expensive. It’s like a car manufacturer who required you to send your car back to the factory for even the smallest repair rather than using a local network even though it’s enormously inconvenient and ten times the price.

 

‘Bait and switch’ and other skullduggery is indeed occasionally practiced by some folks who advertise online but, again, the problem isn’t in the means of advertising, it’s in the character of the people doing the advertising. Local stores, TV merchants and even the US government seem to relish this. To call this the purview of the Internet is shortsighted to say the least.

 

I would make the same observation about your comments on comparatively new businesses. Although I agree that I would not want to be anyone's first customer, the fact that a company has been around for a long time does NOT make them any better at what they do. Sometimes new really is improved and sometimes even large and apparently successful businesses can surprise you (ex. Lehman Brothers).

 

Neil

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Old Fashioned, here. And not impressed or persuaded. You may be able to buy Tiffany's online, but if I have a problem, I am going to the "brick and mortar" Tiffany's for satisfaction. Incidently, Tiffany advises be verry careful about buying even there jewelry online. As there are countless counterfeiters and scoundrels on the Inet, they insist you buy ONLY at Tiffany.com.

 

I don't know about any 'generous sale or return periods' You'll need to be more specific. All I know are the horror stories about 'bait and switch' tactics and fraudulent practices that Inet jewelers apparently practice with great abandon and relative impunity.

 

And excuse me, but I don't know of anyone in the real world who does not need occasion service on both jewelry and fine quality time pieces. What part of the universe did you say you were from where things don't break or are accidently damaged?? In the often misquoted, famous words of an American patriot... "I know not course of action others may take, but as for me, give me service, or give me jewelry from the Inet (death)!!" ;)

Even less impressed or persuaded than you are. I think that Neil has addressed many of the issues with your post, but let me be a little clearer about some specific points.

 

1. "they insist you buy ONLY at Tiffany.com" And who said otherwise? The fact remains you can purchase genuine Tiffany items on the internet. So why not, if you - like me - live approximately 800 miles from the nearest Tiffany boutique? (Not that I have, or that I would, but that's more to do with the other points in the list)

 

2. "I don't know about any 'generous sale or return periods' You'll need to be more specific." Sorry, but this is disingenuous. Many online retailers offer between 10 and 30 days "sale or return no questions asked". Since you are on the internet, it would only take you a few seconds to check. You want names? Blue Nile, Exceldiamonds, Whiteflash, GoodOldGold, ... I could continue for a long time. You may find these terms unexceptional, however: a] allowing the unconditional return of goods is not common anywhere else other than the US - these merchants all ship internationally, many providing even more generous return terms for their international purchasers; b] many B&M-only jewelry stores - in the US and everywhere else - have no stated policy on returns at all! c] I don't know of any purely B&M jewellery dealers that offer significantly more generous terms.

 

3. "All I know are the horror stories[...]" This is even more disingenous than the previous point. As Neil pointed out, there are plenty of horror stories involving incorrectly described merchandise and other types of fraud from B&M enterprises. Interestingly, we only get to hear of all these horror stories because the internet allows much greater transparency of information on a global scale. And if you doubt that, ask the Chinese government for their side of the story. :P

 

4. "I don't know of anyone in the real world who does not need occasion[al] service [...]" Neither do I. If you re-read my post carefully, you'll notice that I simply said I don't value these things, particularly the so called "free inspections". Personally, the much broader choice brought to me by online shopping, the greater transparency and ability to compare prices, levels of service and merchandise quality are worth much more.

 

To requote a piece of your original post:

 

Yes, Tiffany may cost more than your Inet jeweler. But who do you go to for fixing the bent prong? Who is going to inspect, clean, and make periodic adjustment/corrections for you on the spot?

And all this is worth - to you - double the price? You are welcome to continue buying from Tiffany; just don't expect me to follow suit.

 

Oh, by the way - I have no particular axe to grind; I'm a consumer who purchases some jewellery online and some from B&M retailers - in both cases I buy from people I trust; it's only the channel I use that changes depending on where the merchant is located. Some of your other posts seem to identify you as a retailer - I guess of the traditional, non-online type. While I have no reason to doubt that your opinion is held in good faith, let me say that another famous patriot comes to mind: Cicero pro domo sua. :P

Edited by davidelevi
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Good points made by Neil and David.

 

I would add that today it is safer to buy from a reputable Internet Vendor (IV) than from many a B&M stores because the IV lives in the proverbial glass house and therefore customer dissatisfaction with IV Customer Service and/or Product Quality gets disseminated across the fruited plain of cyberspace Internet forums in nanoseconds to an audience of millions. How many potential customers will know if a consumer has had an issue with a B&M Jeweler? 20? 50? 100?

 

In addition, IV's that provide additional diamond information based on various existing technologies above and beyond the lab report stats you have listed above, do so because of their many years of hands on experience working with diamonds on a daily basis and their desire to give you as much information as possible short of your physically seeing the stone in-person.

Edited by barry
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