Jump to content

Picking A Marquise Diamond Color.


buttons
 Share

Recommended Posts

Im making a seperate topic about this to get some pro insight. What are your guys opinions on diamond color? Our jeweler told us when picking a marquise we should try to afford the best color and the let clarity goto the wayside (to stay within budget) He brought in a F color marquise, but looking at it... it had a tinge of yellow (this might of been the fire reflection out) but regardless me and my spouse were not impressed. He had an E marquise that we REALLY liked, but it was $1000 to much.

 

I saw a marquise online that we loved and it was a K in color, but instead of yellow it was blue. I thought the blue-white made it look really classy or more expensive.

 

When it comes to marquise or any diamond what is the most important feature? Cut, color, or clarity? Keep in mind we only care how the diamond looks to the naked eye and not under tight scrunity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you've got them in the right order: cut, colour, clarity. That's with the proviso that clarity has to be "good enough", i.e. eye clean. Once that is complied with, you will see colour... but what you'll notice most of all is cut.

 

BTW - I'm not all that impressed with your jeweller if the reason you rejected an F vs. an E is because of colour. They should be durned close, and an F is most definitely NOT yellow by any account. Who graded the stones?

 

You can find stones with blue fluorescence fairly easily - beware of photos in assessing the effect, though. Make sure you see the stone in natural and artificial lighting before deciding whether you like it or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

HI Buttons,

My first question about what you saw would be- Who graded the color of an F colored diamond that looked yellow?

Davide is correct, you should not be able to see any tint in an F, if it's properly graded. I wold doubt what you saw was called F by GIA.

 

Personally, I love diamonds of all colors- a slight tint never bothered me ever.

BUT- some people are bothered by a tint. It's important to find out if the intended recipient is one of them.

 

When looking at a marquise, the shape and cut are extremely important. Let's face it, if she does not like the shape ( maybe it's too long, or too fat) color and clarity won;t make a difference.

 

While I agree that many photos are not indicative of how a diamond looks, I am quite proud of our photos and the ability to actually give folks a really good idea how the stone looks.

 

For example, the .61ct you looked at on our site.

This is a great example of a "Top Silver" ( -K-L color) diamond with blue fluorescence that really looks colorless in person.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you've got them in the right order: cut, colour, clarity. That's with the proviso that clarity has to be "good enough", i.e. eye clean. Once that is complied with, you will see colour... but what you'll notice most of all is cut.

 

BTW - I'm not all that impressed with your jeweller if the reason you rejected an F vs. an E is because of colour. They should be durned close, and an F is most definitely NOT yellow by any account. Who graded the stones?

 

You can find stones with blue fluorescence fairly easily - beware of photos in assessing the effect, though. Make sure you see the stone in natural and artificial lighting before deciding whether you like it or not.

 

 

I have no idea who graded them. When we were at the jeweler we had no clue what we were looking at. Since then ive read up on the stuff and starting to get some basic understanding. The tinge of yellow im talking about, couldnt that be the "fire"? All i know is the E next to it did not have this tinge what so ever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you've got them in the right order: cut, colour, clarity. That's with the proviso that clarity has to be "good enough", i.e. eye clean. Once that is complied with, you will see colour... but what you'll notice most of all is cut.

 

BTW - I'm not all that impressed with your jeweller if the reason you rejected an F vs. an E is because of colour. They should be durned close, and an F is most definitely NOT yellow by any account. Who graded the stones?

 

You can find stones with blue fluorescence fairly easily - beware of photos in assessing the effect, though. Make sure you see the stone in natural and artificial lighting before deciding whether you like it or not.

 

Thanks to both of you for the replies. I think we like all diamonds too, but when it comes to a wedding ring -- the whole idea is it needs to be "pure" when it has a tinge of color (especially yellow) it looks "tainted" or not pure to us. a slight blue might pass but we want it to be white, white, white :-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I appreciate the symbolic aspect (and personal preference) for white. All I'm saying is that you should have a really hard time telling a D from an E from an F - and all should appear very very white. G, H and I should still appear white (especially if well cut), but if you compare them to an equally well cut D-F stone you should be able to tell the difference. J-K body colour seen from the side will be relatively apparent, but they can still look very white face-up (which is the way you normally see them). I have seen wonderfully cut O-P stones look white, especially if there is some blue fluorescence to help.

 

"Fire" (or dispersion) in a well-cut colourless diamond should be visible in all colours, not just in one, so I'm at a loss to explain why the F stone you saw looked yellow to you. That's assuming it was an F...

Edited by davidelevi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
  • Create New...