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Clarity Enhanced Diamonds


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http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewIt...A:IT&ih=013

 

Can someone please xplain what type of diamonds these are.

chd.jpgClarity enhanced diamonds are 100% natural mined diamonds. The state-of-the-art enhancement process makes the imperfections that are in every diamond invisible to the eye. After the enhancement process, your diamond will show more brilliance with much improved clarity

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Hi...

 

Clarity Enhancement is simply a process where a laser is used to drill into the stone and sometimes used to burn out an inclusion, if that is necessary. Once that is accomplished, a glass-like substance is injected into the hole in the stone, filling the inclusion, which makes it less visible to the naked eye.

 

This is why clarity enhanced diamonds cannot be subjected directly to high heat, such as a jewelers torch, because this can melt out the substance used for the clarity enhancement, thereby reversing the process.

 

This process is explained in further detail at the website of the company that created the process, Yehuda Diamonds. You can find them at Yehuda.com.

 

There is nothing wrong with a clarity enhanced diamond, it is just something that you should be made fully aware of by the vendor, as it does affect the value of the diamond.

 

All the best in your search for the right diamond!

 

Tim A.

Emma Parker & Co.

www.emmaparkerdiamonds.com

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Just one addition/correction:

 

The two treatments described (laser drilling and fracture filling/Yehuda) are indipendent of each other. You can have a diamond that is laser drilled but the hole is not filled, or you can have a diamond that has been fracture filled but not laser drilled.

 

GIA will not grade clarity enhanced diamonds that have been fracture filled, but they will grade laser drilled stones (noting the drilling as a characteristic).

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In total agreement with Barry.

Davide, good point. There are two totally different processes.

I also feel that the eBay listing- and many of the ads for Yehuda Filled diamonds- are designed to be confusing.

Look, even Tim- a dealer- is confused about the difference between a drilled diamond ( not nearly as bad as) and a plastic filled diamond.

 

Clarity enhanced diamonds are 100% natural mined diamonds. The state-of-the-art enhancement process makes the imperfections that are in every diamond invisible to the eye. After the enhancement process, your diamond will show more brilliance with much improved clarity.

The above statement is a perfect example.

1) not every diamond has imperfection

2) a diamond filled with plastic migth not show it's imperfections as much as one not filler, but there's no way it will have more brilliance. The plastic tends to dull the diamond a bit........

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Clarity enhanced diamonds are 100% natural mined diamonds. The state-of-the-art enhancement process makes the imperfections that are in every diamond invisible to the eye. After the enhancement process, your diamond will show more brilliance with much improved clarity.

 

I hadn't seen that and I definitely disagree with it. They are NOT 100% diamond. They contain a glass filler that can change or be damaged over time. That's why the major labs refuse to grade them. Even if there was a standardized grading scale that applied to CE stones, which there isn't, there's no way to know if it still looks the same as the day the lab grader saw it.

 

Neil

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Just one addition/correction:

 

The two treatments described (laser drilling and fracture filling/Yehuda) are indipendent of each other. You can have a diamond that is laser drilled but the hole is not filled, or you can have a diamond that has been fracture filled but not laser drilled.

 

GIA will not grade clarity enhanced diamonds that have been fracture filled, but they will grade laser drilled stones (noting the drilling as a characteristic).

 

 

Thanks for adding that David...I should have noted that distinction...thanks...

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Stay away from fracture filled diamonds. They are an accident waiting to happen.

 

 

Barry,

 

Can you please clarify why they are "an accident waiting to happen"? I've been doing a lot of research and it seems like the only people really knocking the CE diamonds are jewelers who don't sell CE diamonds... Most of what I have read indicates it's simply taking advantage of all that technology has to offer.

 

Thanks,

Josh

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As a consumer, I won't ever (knowingly) buy a fracture filled stone - be it a diamond, an emerald or a ruby. Apart from resale considerations, the filling substance never has the same properties as the stone. When heated it will expand/contract at a different rate and it will react to chemicals (even soap) differently. I'd always be there expecting it to turn colour or pop out. Even if it is fairly safe, I just don't like the idea.

 

Maybe I've just been brainwashed. :wacko:

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"it will react to chemicals (even soap) differently"

 

Seriously? Do you have any proof of this? I haven't bought a diamond yet, but am getting close and this would be something good to know.

 

I have talked to 6 wholesalers. 4 of the 6 purchased CE diamonds for their wives as engagement rings. All 6 sell both CE and real diamonds. The only thing I've been told is not to dip the CE diamond in boiling acid and to be sure and let any jeweler that works on it know about the CE (just to ensure they don't direct a torch right at the diamond).

 

Can people honestly say it's a bad idea or are most people on this forum "diamond purists"? Please be honest - either pro or con.

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"it will react to chemicals (even soap) differently"

 

Seriously? Do you have any proof of this? I haven't bought a diamond yet, but am getting close and this would be something good to know.

 

I have talked to 6 wholesalers. 4 of the 6 purchased CE diamonds for their wives as engagement rings. All 6 sell both CE and real diamonds. The only thing I've been told is not to dip the CE diamond in boiling acid and to be sure and let any jeweler that works on it know about the CE (just to ensure they don't direct a torch right at the diamond).

 

Can people honestly say it's a bad idea or are most people on this forum "diamond purists"? Please be honest - either pro or con.

 

 

Hi Wilson,

 

It is my understanding that most fracture filled diamonds are filled from pre-existing surface reaching fractures. This can bring durability issues into the equation.

 

Here is a way to see how the six wholesalers maybe really feel about clarity enhanced diamonds.

 

Look at their respective trade-in policies and see if these fracture filled diamonds have a lifetime 100% trade-in toward another diamond (especially a untreated one)

 

When I see untreated diamond sellers with this type of policy, it tells me they think enough of the diamond they sold and would therefore not mind owning it again.

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I have no great problem with the idea or even the practice of them as long as they are properly disclosed however there is a huge problem with the grading that, to me would be a deal killer.

 

I'll start by saying that the filling holds up well under normal types of conditions (high heat and strong acids are a problem but these are pretty easy to avoid if you’re careful) and given a good cutting job they can be very pretty. The major manufactures have lifetime warranties against both heat and acid damage.

 

The grading problem is this: Firstly, the GIA grading scale that we’re all familiar with doesn’t apply to filled stones. A ‘filled’ feather isn’t one of the choices on GIA grading and they don’t all fill equally well so in addition to a new clarity attribute, there needs to be a range of them from barely filled to barely visible. Since someone paid extra to have this done, presumably because it would make the stone look better, I think it's reasonable to expect that this new attribute is going to be the #1 clarity characteristic of the stone.

 

Secondly, it’s possible for the fill to change over time precisely because of the heat/acid problem above. Even if you didn’t do it, you have no way of knowing if the stone still looks like what the lab saw back when they saw it unless you personally were the lab client. This is rarely the case as almost every diamond these days is sold with a grading claim attached and more often than not, this claim is coming from a lab that was selected by, and possibly even owned by, the selling dealer. If you have no way of knowing if what you’re looking at is the same thing the lab looked at, what good is it even if the lab is legit? This is the reason that GIA & AGS won't issue reports on the things.

 

The result is a free-for-all among the sellers. What is an SI2-CE? Face up it looks sort of like a GIA-SI2? Maybe. The one you linked to says it was graded by an unidentified 'world recognized independent laboratory'. Is that useful to you? Why? There are no standards, there is no licensure, there is no recourse, you don't even know who it is that called it that much less what scale they were using or how they came to the conclusion they did. Somebody somewhere called it an SI2 and was willing to write it on a report. That doesn't make them wrong, but it sure doesn't build confidence that you should care what they have to say.

 

What is it ‘worth’? That’s often the biggest worry for shoppers. They know it's been modified and they're ok with that but they can't afford an untreated natural stone and they're looking for a 'deal'. No problem. Most CE stones are being sold through ‘discount’ type outlets like ebay sellers or at flea markets and they usually take the position that they are offering a great price by pointing out that similar looking untreated natural stones usually cost more at high end jewelry stores. That’s true enough but also irrelevant. Everybody seems to claim that they are selling for a quarter of the price of everybody else but they are asking you to compare against completely different merchandise being sold by folks who don’t even sell the product at hand. Preposterous.

 

If you’re shopping CE, you need to be shopping against offers for similar CE stones and you need to compare against the merits and demerits present in CE stones. Is there a durability concern? The fill doesn’t make the cracks go away, it just makes them harder to see so if there was a durability issue before, it’s still there. Is it a ‘good’ SI2 or a bad one? Because of the above issues, the range is enormous and almost all of these stones are being sold in environments where you can’t actually look at the stone, even if you knew what to look for. Is it well cut? Maybe, but most aren't. They're usually cut to produce maximum weight, not maximum beauty. You are placing 100% confidence in the dealer to choose you one and the dealers who specialize in these tend to be exactly the ones that are least responsive to your best interests. Relying on an unknown 'lab' selected by the dealer is no different.

 

Even more than with untreated natural stones, choosing a dealer that you can trust and who is familiar with the product is essential in shopping for CE goods. If you want to go this route, choose your dealer first. I guarantee that if you shop by comparing dealer supplied weight/clarity/color descriptors and then choose the dealer with the lowest stated price you are NOT going to get the most for your money.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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"it will react to chemicals (even soap) differently"

 

Seriously? Do you have any proof of this? I haven't bought a diamond yet, but am getting close and this would be something good to know.

 

I have talked to 6 wholesalers. 4 of the 6 purchased CE diamonds for their wives as engagement rings. All 6 sell both CE and real diamonds. The only thing I've been told is not to dip the CE diamond in boiling acid and to be sure and let any jeweler that works on it know about the CE (just to ensure they don't direct a torch right at the diamond).

 

Can people honestly say it's a bad idea or are most people on this forum "diamond purists"? Please be honest - either pro or con.

 

Sorry - I got a little carried away. I said I won't buy a fracture filled stone, mentioning what I think are the three most frequently treated ones (diamonds, rubies, emeralds). Some emerald treatments (cedar oil) will effectively be washed away by strong detergents; I don't think that's the case with diamonds, which are largely filled with particular types of high-RI glass (which will get corroded by hydrofluoric acid, but that's not soap) - my apologies for not making it clear.

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