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A Diamond's Age


pbooze
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I imagine you are referring to when the stone was cut or set, rather than the age of the stone itself...

 

The quick answer is "it depends, but generally not". Old cuts dating back to the 19th century have their market, but as far as I can see the prices are equivalent or slightly below those of modern, well-cut diamonds.

 

Stones dating to the 18th century or earlier usually have value as part of an antique, rather than in and of themselves. This can vary from negligible to staggering depending on many many factors, but generally the stone(s) itself is not one of them - famous stones (e.g. the Koh-i-noor or the Dresden diamond) excepted.

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I imagine you are referring to when the stone was cut or set, rather than the age of the stone itself...

 

The quick answer is "it depends, but generally not". Old cuts dating back to the 19th century have their market, but as far as I can see the prices are equivalent or slightly below those of modern, well-cut diamonds.

 

Stones dating to the 18th century or earlier usually have value as part of an antique, rather than in and of themselves. This can vary from negligible to staggering depending on many many factors, but generally the stone(s) itself is not one of them - famous stones (e.g. the Koh-i-noor or the Dresden diamond) excepted.

 

Thank you for the information this is very helpful.

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I actually slightly disagree here. It’s certainly true that there is no sensible way to date a stone and therefore age has no real meaning in this context, a lot of the diamond business has to do with fashion and that DOES change over time. Older round stones were generally cut differently than modern ones and modern cutters are cutting them the way they do because that’s what their customers want. They COULD be cutting Old Miners if they wanted to but generally they prefer not for purely market related reasons.

 

Back in the 80’s, a lot of stones were cut with big tables and shallow depths for example. This gave the stones a bigger face up appearance and this was promoted as a feature. I’m certainly not saying that they were wrong, that’s what customers wanted and that’s what the cutters delivered. Big was in, but this is not what’s moving well now and such stones now sell at a discount instead of a premium when they hit the market. Fluorescence has been through some similar fashion trends. ‘Blue white’ used to be sold as a feature and it referred to a white stone with blue fluoro that sold for a premium. Now the opposite is happening. Internet shoppers will routinely refuse to even consider a fluorescent stone, even if it’s cheaper, and this has a profound affect on the marketplace. Low colors have a similar problem. Colors below L but not quite to what can be sold as fancy are extremely difficult to sell at this point in time. Back in the 50's, that was a typical stone and the selling point was size.

 

This isn't quite the same as saying age affects price but it's close. Age affects fashion ... and fashion affects price.

 

 

Neil

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If you are referring to the "age" of the diamond lab grading report, the answer is No, it is not a detrimental factor.

 

For example, GIA recommends that only a report of 8-10 years old be re-submitted for verification, otherwise you're good.

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