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Question About Color


gusnandy
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Considered by whom?

 

On the GIA scale, which is the one with the 'D' grade, there is no higher ranking. There are folks who talk up 'Super-D' and similar terms to promote particular stones but, to answer your question, no there is not a recognized higher color grade than D.

 

Neil

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As with all grades, there are boundaries and some D’s do look better than others. This is true of SI1’s, Excellent’s and any other grading category given. Frankly, I think the color grading system is a bit of a problem in part because the 23 grades is simply too many. People can’t see the difference. Even well meaning pro’s need to set up decidedly artificial environments to make the call and then argue constantly over the results. To me this doesn’t match all that well to the standard consumer desire to simply know which one is ‘better’. The only reason that D’s cost so much more than E’s is because GIA has assigned a letter to them. If GIA had only 10 grades, for example, this difference would largely evaporate whereas now it’s one of the most important grading calls there is. If they had high D, middle D and low D etc. as some people try to do, effectively expanding the scale to 69 grades, I’m confidence the market would attach a significant premium to ‘high D’ over ‘middle D’. By all means, if a dealer has an especially beautiful D they can and should promote it as such but it’s still just a D.

 

Neil

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Excellent points Neil!!

 

If we are comparing 2 diamonds graded "D" color by GIA, the price should be the same, no matter how much the seller wants to claim it's a "high D" ( as long as the other specs are comparable)

 

BUT- you mention 23 grades- which is leaving out all the fancy color grades.

That's where there is far more variation within each grade.

For example, let's compare two hypothetical diamonds, both graded Fancy Intense Yellow by GIA.

If one stone is a borderline "Fancy Yellow"- the next lighter grade- and the other is a borderline Fancy Vivid Yellow - the next darker grade) there can be a huge difference in the price.

I've seen cases where a Fancy Intense Yellow SI2 was worth considerably more than a similar size Fancy Intense Yellow IF- both graded by GIA.

The difference between a strong intense yellow, and a weaker one is quite easy to see naked eye.....

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Neil,

 

I think you make an interesting an valid point here...I know that we used to have a saying..."analysis paralysis", where customers get so caught up in the color grade that they actually start to "see" the color. Less color grades, based more on human eye observation in normal everyday lighting might be more helpful to the consumer...however changing the system at this point seems rather impossible.

 

As for the "Super D", I have only seen this one time, and I have to admit...the stone took your breath away! I would never advise any customer to go on the hunt for such a stone, it would be a frustrating and impossible undertaking.

 

Interesting discussion though!

 

Tim A.

Emma Parker & Co.

www.emmaparkerdiamonds.com

 

As with all grades, there are boundaries and some D’s do look better than others. This is true of SI1’s, Excellent’s and any other grading category given. Frankly, I think the color grading system is a bit of a problem in part because the 23 grades is simply too many. People can’t see the difference. Even well meaning pro’s need to set up decidedly artificial environments to make the call and then argue constantly over the results. To me this doesn’t match all that well to the standard consumer desire to simply know which one is ‘better’. The only reason that D’s cost so much more than E’s is because GIA has assigned a letter to them. If GIA had only 10 grades, for example, this difference would largely evaporate whereas now it’s one of the most important grading calls there is. If they had high D, middle D and low D etc. as some people try to do, effectively expanding the scale to 69 grades, I’m confidence the market would attach a significant premium to ‘high D’ over ‘middle D’. By all means, if a dealer has an especially beautiful D they can and should promote it as such but it’s still just a D.

 

Neil

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