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Opinion, Please..


JPham
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I am looking into buying this stone. The information below is what is on the GIA report. I do not know what most of it means. Please give me your opinion.

 

Round Brilliant

7.18 - 7.21 x 4.31 mm

1.37 carat

Color: G

Clarity: VVS2

Cut: Good

TBL: 57%

TD: 59.9%

CA 32.5 degree

PA: 40.4 degree

ST: 50%

LH: 80%

Girdle: Med to STK, F

Culet: None

Polish: Excellent

Symmetry: Excellent

Fluorescence: Medium

Internal and surface graining is not shown

Key: Pinpoint, Needle

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Hello JPham, welcome.

 

If what you are looking for is info on interpreting all those numbers/jargon, you could do worse than reading the tutorials here to begin with. I think many people here, myself included, would be happy to answer more specific questions about any of the items on the report.

 

I don't mean to sound flippant, but opinion about what?

 

There are better stones than that one, if this is what you want to know. There are worse ones, too. There are bigger, smaller, whiter, more tinted, cheaper, more expensive ones... pretty much anything you want, and much you don't want either.

 

Would I buy it? Probably not, unless it's at an incredibly low price for what it is - and even then I'm not sure. Why?

 

1. A stone with a GIA cut grade of "Good" is unlikely to be anything special from a liveliness/sparkliness etc. point of view. I assume you are thinking of buying based mostly on grading information and expert(s) opinion, so unless you have a strong recommendation by a trusted expert who has seen the stone, I'd avoid it. I haven't seen it either, so I'm just going with the info you have provided; I may be totally wrong, but given there are stones for which an expert's recommendation is available and/or have a better cut grade... I'd pick some of those to start with!

 

2. I'd be paying over the odds for something that I would not appreciate visually - VVS clarity

 

3. It's a round brilliant, which is a cut I don't particularly like.

 

All of which is personal preference.

Edited by davidelevi
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I would like to ask the poster, if you don't understand the numbers on the lab report, how can you make an informed decision for spending your money.

 

What is it about this stone that makes you think that you would like to buy it? Do you have any photos of the diamond, or any information about the light performance of the stone etc?

 

 

If not, you might want to rethink your decision. Buying stones sight unseen without anything but a lab report can result in a disappointing experience.

 

Just going by the numbers on the paper, I would say the stone is slightly shallow, and may not result in great light performance.

 

If you want to learn more about the cut of the diamond you can go to:

www.isee2.com

www.gemex.com

 

 

If you need any help in finding a brilliant diamond at a great price, feel free to contact me.

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I agree...you definitely want to get yourself as educated as possible so that you understand all of the numbers on the report, at least to a point.

 

I would definitely not buy this diamond. I could go into a long breakdown of why, but that is not necessary. I need look no farther than crown and pavilion angle combination, which have a heavy impact on the diamonds light performance. This diamond has a poor combination, and would not score well on the GEMEX or the ISEE2.

 

You should start by reading some diamond tutorials. There are some here, and many of the vendors have them on their sites as well, as do we. Read and ask questions, then you will be able to make a decision that you can feel confident about.

 

Good luck, and don't hesitate to ask lots of questions!

 

Tim A.

Emma Parker & Co.

www.emmaparkerdiamonds.com

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I'm not a big fan of either the Gemex or the Isee2 tools as a shopping approach but I do find that the GIA cut grading system seems to match fairly well with what people like, at least as far as it goes. Good means you're in the bottom 20%. That doesn't mean you won't like it, and this is usually offset by a reduction in price and you need to decide if it's worth the tradeoff but, personally, I wouldn't do it, especially since the VVS2/G is going to cost you a premium. If you're pushing on parameters to bring down the price, cutting is the LAST area where I would want to compromise.

 

Neil

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I'm in total agreement with Neil.

 

If you want to learn more about the cut of the diamond you can go to:

www.isee2.com

www.gemex.com

 

Furthermore, neither of the sites Jan mentioned teach consumers anything about cut. they are simply sites to promote tools that many ( if not most) dealers consider totally worthless.

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Personally I am neither for nor against GEMEX or ISEE2. I don't use either and don't intend to, however, having analyzed 1000nds of stones on both GEMEX and ISEE2 during my time in the industry, I think worthless is not really an accurate statement. While both have definite strengths and weaknesses, their results also do correlate to helping to find very well cut stones.

 

As I said...I am neither for nor against these technologies, and I don't currently use them in my lab, but due to my extensive experience with both of them, I know that they both do hold some merrit.

 

Just my opinion...

 

Tim A.

Emma Parker & Co.

www.emmaparkerdiamonds.com

 

I'm in total agreement with Neil.

 

If you want to learn more about the cut of the diamond you can go to:

www.isee2.com

www.gemex.com

 

Furthermore, neither of the sites Jan mentioned teach consumers anything about cut. they are simply sites to promote tools that many ( if not most) dealers consider totally worthless.

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Fair enough Tim- but would you say the sites in question teach consumers anything about cut?

 

Which is one of my main points.

The sites in question, to me, are nothing more than advertisements for something who's utility is, at best, in question. In my eyes, and the eyes of the EVERY cutter and dealer we deal with, the machines are totally worthless for the purpose of assesing the cut of a diamond.

 

YOur point is they are not totally worthless......then, if they are not worhtless, the only value is helping sellers use these "technologies" to insinuate their diamonds are somehow better based on the "information" these tools generate.

 

 

It's like piling BS on top of BS- the results are....well, BS.

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Furthermore, neither of the sites Jan mentioned teach consumers anything about cut. they are simply sites to promote tools that many ( if not most) dealers consider totally worthless.

 

 

I know several well respected diamond dealers that have used the Gemex brilliancescope for years and also the Isee2 as well. They happen to sell some of the finer diamonds .

 

Barry has used the brillinacescope for years, I doubt he would say it has no value in picking out diamonds with top light return.

 

So to come out and dismiss these things altogether as some sales and marketing scheme I think is more of a personal preference, not fact.

 

 

Brad

Edited by Bradley
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Well, there's actually two separate points here.

The first is the validity of the "tools"

 

Yes, a limited number of sellers use one or both. But the vast majority of sellers of finer diamonds do not use either one.

 

The other point is how educational the sites that Jan mentioned are- and I can find no information of value concerning the cut of diamonds on either site.

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Well, there's actually two separate points here.

The first is the validity of the "tools"

 

Yes, a limited number of sellers use one or both. But the vast majority of sellers of finer diamonds do not use either one.

 

The other point is how educational the sites that Jan mentioned are- and I can find no information of value concerning the cut of diamonds on either site.

 

The vast majority of sellers I find aren`t really interested in providing any additional " proof " of a diamonds light return . Most will chant down their own personal agenda and BS speil to sell a diamond, but when it comes down to it, nada, nothing.

 

You may say it is " worthless ", but over the years many consumers have appreciated the added information, and I think they can decide for themselves.

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True, there is no substitute for your eyes and looking at the diamond. The human eye is an incredible marvel and a tool to mimic what the eye sees and perceives may never be built. Many Internet shoppers, though, don't have personal visual access and have to rely on the Internet Vendor. While these tools are not perfect and no one tool should be totally relied upon, they do in aggregate have functional utility and provide useful information to the consumer above and beyond only depending on the numbers printed on the lab grading report and being told "this is a great looking diamond!"

 

Our experience is that consumers do appreciate this extra information and they find it very useful in determining whether or not to buy the diamond. No doubt there do exist nuances from diamond to diamond in their face up appearance and light refraction even though they may display the same scores on the Brilliancescope or other tool. This is where the experienced Vendor plays an important role in being able to describe these nuances to the consumer and explain differences in brilliance, dispersion, and sparkle.

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I get your point Barry- sellers that don't have diamonds ( sites that are selling off of a list) need some sort of "stat" to make it seem their diamond is somehow worth buying.

 

I'm sure that you - and Jan and Brad- use these things in a way that your clients appreciate.

 

If you want to learn more about the cut of the diamond you can go to:

www.isee2.com

www.gemex.com

 

My point, still unanswered, is that neither site does anything to educate consumers about cut. Both sites simply promote themselves.

Or am I missing something?

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Dave;

 

Consumers that have worked with us know that we don't push a diamond just to make a sale. The tools we use

are an adjunct and we still use our expertise to make our recommendation. If we don't like the diamond we will recommend that the customer pass on it and we'll look for something else.

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100% Barry- we agree on that.

IN your case, you have the diamond in hand, and can give an expert assessment.

I have no doubt whatsoever that you would use whatever tools you use in a transparent manner.

 

I think both sites would be far better if they actually had some basic info on the cut of a diamond. JMO- but I would not recommend going to either site to learn about the cut of a diamond.

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100% Barry- we agree on that.

IN your case, you have the diamond in hand, and can give an expert assessment.

I have no doubt whatsoever that you would use whatever tools you use in a transparent manner.

 

I think both sites would be far better if they actually had some basic info on the cut of a diamond. JMO- but I would not recommend going to either site to learn about the cut of a diamond.

 

There is some good information for consumers. How diamonds are formed in earth, sourced, cut, polished, and the craftsmanship, faceting structure. Even shows a simulation of the diamond being cut to an Ideal cut hearts & arrows.

 

http://www.isee2.com/consumer_home_V3.php?language=english

 

http://www.isee2.com/buying_experience_V3.php

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All due respect Bradely, but you are joking right?

 

Aside for a page listing colors and clarities with no explaination whatsoever, where can one larn anything at all about the cut of a diamond on either of these sites?

The Isee2 site is promoting thier own diamonds, plain and simple. There's nothing whatsoever in the way of cut information.

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