Jump to content

Really Good Deal?


Lisa R
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have been looking at a couple pairs of princess cut diamond earrings. One is 1.46 and the other 1.50tw. Both are I color, clarity is SI2, very good cut. I have looked at them under the microscope, 1.46 has no carbon, just a few small bubble type inclusion, and the 1.50 has a carbon in the center of one stone only visible under the microscope. Very reputable local jeweler who has been in business for years. 1.46 is $2,880, and the 1.50 is $3,080? Is this to good to be true? Am I missing something. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is two pairs of earrings with one stone each and 1.46 and 1.50cts total weight respectively that you're deciding between or 2 earrings with 1 stone each, one of which is 1.46 and the other 1.50cts.? Assuming it's the former and assuming that the grading is accurate, that sounds like a reasonable deal. A jeweler who has been around for a while and that you're inclined to trust is a good thing.

 

Who graded the cuts to be 'good' and what do they mean by that? Who graded the clarity and color?

 

Neil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For clarification, yes two pairs or earrings. I am not sure who graded them, I know that they have gotten them from their vender, and he is the one who said they were SI2 and very good cut. All the other jewelers I went to were $4,100 to 4,500, with the exact same parameters. This is why I am concerned. I have not personally dealt with this jeweler before but have friends who have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What you are missing is a GIA lab report. Stones of that grade with lab report and accurate grading run more. For instance you could get a pair weighing 1.41 ct. in VS2 G for $3895. These would be also laser inscribed with the GIA lab report numbers and well cut and come with a 100% upgrade in the future set in your choice of yellow or white gold.

 

 

 

Just out of curiosity, what are the millimeter size of the ones you are looking at? Also the table and depth percentage? Do they have a GIA lab report or is it an "instore" grade?

Edited by jan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The accuracy of the specs you listed are a huge deal. The 'same exact parameters' can result in a truly alarming range of products.

 

Both clarity and color are just over the top of a grade drop that has a significant price affect. That is to say, SI2—> I1 is about a 15% issue and I –> J is about the same.

 

It’s also worth noting that you’re just above a size that has a significant price affect. Dropping below 0.70cts or so is another 15% or so.

 

Cutting is another big deal. Not everyone uses the same cut scale and terms like ‘very good’ are notoriously vague. This is going to be another 15%- 30% issue.

 

Add all of that up and we’re talking about a big range and what seems like just some cryptic letters and numbers takes on some real importance.

 

One of the cool features of this site is you can see it for your self. Click on the link titled ‘find online jeweler’. Don’t worry, we won’t tell Hermann and you can do this even if you don’t have any intention of ever buying online. Enter into the form 0.70 - -.76cts , I-J, SI2-I1. This’ll get you hundreds of offers for stones within that set of specs. Click a couple of times on the header of the price column and you can see what are the most expensive and which are the cheapest in the offerings. Even if you throw out the ones that are likely to be errors, you get a range of about $1000 to $2300 per stone. Setting 2 stones into a pair of stud earrings will run you about $150 so it really is about the diamonds but we’ve still got a range of $2150 all the way to $4750 for the same description and the same set of a dozen or so dealers.

 

Local jewelers generally cost a little more than the folks here and that’s why I said that you’re price seemed reasonable IF THE GRADING IS RIGHT. Since you don’t know who graded them or even what scale they are using, I would be nervous. At the very least, make the deal contingent on grading by your own expert and, if they fall short for any reason, you can get a 100% refund.

 

Neil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The accuracy of the specs you listed are a huge deal. The 'same exact parameters' can result in a truly alarming range of products.

 

Both clarity and color are just over the top of a grade drop that has a significant price affect. That is to say, SI2—> I1 is about a 15% issue and I –> J is about the same.

 

It’s also worth noting that you’re just above a size that has a significant price affect. Dropping below 0.70cts or so is another 15% or so.

 

Cutting is another big deal. Not everyone uses the same cut scale and terms like ‘very good’ are notoriously vague. This is going to be another 15%- 30% issue.

 

Add all of that up and we’re talking about a big range and what seems like just some cryptic letters and numbers takes on some real importance.

 

One of the cool features of this site is you can see it for your self. Click on the link titled ‘find online jeweler’. Don’t worry, we won’t tell Hermann and you can do this even if you don’t have any intention of ever buying online. Enter into the form 0.70 - -.76cts , I-J, SI2-I1. This’ll get you hundreds of offers for stones within that set of specs. Click a couple of times on the header of the price column and you can see what are the most expensive and which are the cheapest in the offerings. Even if you throw out the ones that are likely to be errors, you get a range of about $1000 to $2300 per stone. Setting 2 stones into a pair of stud earrings will run you about $150 so it really is about the diamonds but we’ve still got a range of $2150 all the way to $4750 for the same description and the same set of a dozen or so dealers.

 

Local jewelers generally cost a little more than the folks here and that’s why I said that you’re price seemed reasonable IF THE GRADING IS RIGHT. Since you don’t know who graded them or even what scale they are using, I would be nervous. At the very least, make the deal contingent on grading by your own expert and, if they fall short for any reason, you can get a 100% refund.

 

Neil

 

You both are great. I have been struggeling with this for the past couple of day and have now decided that I am not ready to make the purchase, I need to do more research. I will definately take your suggestion of looking and comparing online, and to make the puchase contingent upon grading. I have had several jewelers tell me that they do not sell certified diamonds for earrings, because of the extra cost of certification, plus putting a top grade stone is earrings is not necessary, and that is why I am not sure how they arrived at the specs. I do not understand the depth percentage and milimeter size. I have had another jeweler tell me that I could bring the earrings in to her and she would look at them and let me know if they were a good deal or not. I have dealt with this jeweler before. Thanks for your help any other suggestions are appreciated.

Lisa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lisa,

 

Glad to be of help. I generally agree with the premise that you can get away with lower grading on earrings than in, say, an engagement ring and that this helps bring the price down but this is no excuse for sloppy grading. There's nothing wrong with K colors if they're being sold and priced as K's but far too often what's really going on is that this is an excuse to sell them for I's. I also don't buy the excuse of the high lab fees. Here's the pricing structure from GIA's lab, straight from the proverbial horses mouth.

 

http://www.gia.edu/gemtradelab/31548/fees.cfm

 

Stones like you're considering cost $59/each to have graded (usually plus some shipping for folks who don't live in sunny Carlsbad or NYC). If we were talking about $200 stones I would agree with them, the lab fees are an unacceptable bump to the cost but when we're talking about $2000-$3000 stones, that's not even 3% and it's considerably less than a single grade variation on any of clarity, color or cutting.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I disagree on earrings being able to be lower quality than a ring. They are right up near your face where everyone sees them, even before a ring which is down by your side on a hand. Most of the time people look at your eyes, then your ears and move down. :)

Earrings are worn to be seen by others versus yourself. A quality earrings is a great choice if you want them to sparkle. :)

 

I don't see the point of ever investing in a stone that is not of quality. To me it is a waste of money if it is cloudy or poor quality.

I also don't buy fruit that is over ripe or near rotting. To me it is also not a good value.

Edited by jan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
  • Create New...