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Color Vs Clarity


tmc970407
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Welcome,

 

You’ve stated several things as facts that I’m inclined to question based on your comments.

 

¾ ct. is a curious statement and is often a problem. Most diamonds are sold by a decimal weight like 0.75cts. This may seem like a curious difference but 0.69cts. is priced very importantly different from 0.74cts. while both can be described as ‘approx.’ ¾.

 

Ideal cut. According to whom and using what scale. Presumably it’s according to GSI and, like Barry, I don’t recall ever hearing of them. That doesn’t make them wrong but different people use this term very differently. Without more background I would assign this no more credibility than a used car salesman grading a car as a ‘creampuff’. Maybe it is, but what have you really learned from the grading?

 

H, VS2 & SI1. Again, you are relying heavily on the opinion of GSI. It’s up to you to decide if they are deserving of your confidence but the default answer should be NO. Research the lab and decide if you’re willing to bet your hard earned money on their reliability. Bear in mind that YOU were not the client here. Somebody decided that a GSI document would be helpful in selling you the diamond and they paid GSI to do it for that reason. As with the above comment about cutting, this doesn’t make them wrong but it does call into question things like the scales used, how they deal with ‘borderline’ calls, what information is included on the reports and what is omitted, etc. You’ll find quite a bit of discussion in the forum here about the merits and demerits of different labs but you’ll also notice that one of the few areas where ALL of the experts seem to agree is that safest way to shop is to stick with AGS and GIA grading.

 

Jullecut.

I’ve no idea what this is. Is your stone a specialty cut, meaning that it’s got something other than the standard 57 facet pattern or is this a brand associated with a particular cutting house or possibly that store? The difference is sort of important if we’re to give you meaningful advice.

 

Rogers & Holland. I’ve never heard of them either but don’t hold this against them, I’m thousands of miles away after all. I bring them up because different retailers offer different benefits for shopping with them. This can range from things like trade in programs and warranties to financing to convenient showrooms, free coffee and pretty salesgirls. It’s up to you to decide what sorts of things are of value to you. Not surprisingly, the rock bottom prices tend to come from places that have rather stripped down services and the ones that include a bundle of everything you could ever want are towards the higher end. It’s a big world and Tiffany’s and Costco both seem to coexist happily with some pretty similar goods and both have legions of enthusiastic customers. Carefully choosing a dealer who suits your style is a good first step. You may have already done this but it you just sort of wandered into this store because it was easy, you may want to consider your criteria. There are LOTS of competitors in this biz.

 

EGA: And you thought we were going to be talking about color vs. clarity! :)

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Welcome,

 

You’ve stated several things as facts that I’m inclined to question based on your comments.

 

¾ ct. is a curious statement and is often a problem. Most diamonds are sold by a decimal weight like 0.75cts. This may seem like a curious difference but 0.69cts. is priced very importantly different from 0.74cts. while both can be described as ‘approx.’ ¾.

 

Ideal cut. According to whom and using what scale. Presumably it’s according to GSI and, like Barry, I don’t recall ever hearing of them. That doesn’t make them wrong but different people use this term very differently. Without more background I would assign this no more credibility than a used car salesman grading a car as a ‘creampuff’. Maybe it is, but what have you really learned from the grading?

 

H, VS2 & SI1. Again, you are relying heavily on the opinion of GSI. It’s up to you to decide if they are deserving of your confidence but the default answer should be NO. Research the lab and decide if you’re willing to bet your hard earned money on their reliability. Bear in mind that YOU were not the client here. Somebody decided that a GSI document would be helpful in selling you the diamond and they paid GSI to do it for that reason. As with the above comment about cutting, this doesn’t make them wrong but it does call into question things like the scales used, how they deal with ‘borderline’ calls, what information is included on the reports and what is omitted, etc. You’ll find quite a bit of discussion in the forum here about the merits and demerits of different labs but you’ll also notice that one of the few areas where ALL of the experts seem to agree is that safest way to shop is to stick with AGS and GIA grading.

 

Jullecut.

I’ve no idea what this is. Is your stone a specialty cut, meaning that it’s got something other than the standard 57 facet pattern or is this a brand associated with a particular cutting house or possibly that store? The difference is sort of important if we’re to give you meaningful advice.

 

Rogers & Holland. I’ve never heard of them either but don’t hold this against them, I’m thousands of miles away after all. I bring them up because different retailers offer different benefits for shopping with them. This can range from things like trade in programs and warranties to financing to convenient showrooms, free coffee and pretty salesgirls. It’s up to you to decide what sorts of things are of value to you. Not surprisingly, the rock bottom prices tend to come from places that have rather stripped down services and the ones that include a bundle of everything you could ever want are towards the higher end. It’s a big world and Tiffany’s and Costco both seem to coexist happily with some pretty similar goods and both have legions of enthusiastic customers. Carefully choosing a dealer who suits your style is a good first step. You may have already done this but it you just sort of wandered into this store because it was easy, you may want to consider your criteria. There are LOTS of competitors in this biz.

 

EGA: And you thought we were going to be talking about color vs. clarity! :)

 

Neil

 

Wow lots of info. Thanks. Both are .71 and its a princess cut stone....and from what I gather there is not real "ideal cut" for a princess. It is 57 facest and the full name of GSI is Gemological Science international. I know the measurements of the G SI1. 5.03x4.81x3.60mm

and the depth is 75 table 68 crown 12.1 and pavillion 61.3 girdle is thin to medium.

 

I really love the princess shape....but I heard that they never really have the fire and brillance of a round. The issue I seem to be running into is that you go to the jewelrys and they are so sprakley and seem to have lots of fire....then you bring them to the natural light....and it looks like a white stone to me.....any suggestions would be great. I want something that is going to be an eye catcher. Thanks so much.

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By all means include in your evaluation an inspection of the stone(s) in a variety of different lighting conditions, including natural light. Most stores have several different places about the store that you can go to do this if you simply ask although I wouldn’t recommend simply heading for the parking lot without discussing your intentions first. This might have unintended consequences. :) Not surprisingly, the lighting right over the display cases is designed to make the merchandise look as attractive as possible. Surely this isn't a surprise. Isn't this what you would do if you owned a jewelry store?

 

There actually is an AGS ideal standard for princess cuts and they are quite lovely. You can get one by insisting on AGSL lab documentation or, if you’re willing to work a little harder at it, by using an AGS appraiser with an appropriate gem lab to grade the stone. It’s not an evaluation that can be done based on the dimensions. You're correct that the best princess cuts show less light return than the best round cuts but in both cases there is quite a range and light return is not the definition of beauty. An 'eye catcher' is not an unreasonable or impossible standard in any shape.

 

Neil

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