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Consumers Beware!


MarriedToDiamonds
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If you're thinking that you've done enough research and are able to identify a good diamond when you see one :huh: , then challenge yourself. Participate in this poll and find out if you can tell the difference between a real diamond and a cubic zirconia!

_________________________________________

 

My husband has been in the wholesale diamond business for over 20 years and I could tell you stories that will make your hair stand on end. But instead, I would rather provide you with this warning - be careful when you first purchase your diamond or diamond jewelry and later, be even more careful (as this is more common), when turning in your diamond jewelry for repair and/or cleaning.

 

As an inexperienced diamond shopper, you may never realize that the diamond you bought at that jewelry booth in some jewelry mart is not the one you actually ended up with after the diamond has been set in your setting.

 

It's a very simple scam. You shop around for a diamond. You are certain that you know your stuff because you've surfed the Internet, read all types of advice columns, even read booklets on the subject so now you are sure you are almost a diamond expert. But dealers will always know better than you.

 

So you found your perfect diamond and selected the perfect setting. The salesperson is glad to have the stone/s set for you and lets you know that your ring will be ready for pick up in about 4 days. Here's the key. This is NOT done by ALL diamond dealers or stores, but there are plenty of crooks out there so you must be alert. Before sending your stone to be set, the salesperson replaces your stone with a lower quality one and has it set. Once the stone is in the ring, you will NEVER know the difference.

 

The same thing could happen when you have your diamond jewelry cleaned or repaired. The shop that takes it in has an opportunity to replace the stone/s but it's even easier for the setter. Many shops do not have their own on site setters so they send pieces out to be set, repaired and cleaned.

 

I know three people, just within my circle of friends and family, who over the past couple of years ended up with stones of lower quality and even a cubic zirconia in place of their original diamond/s!

 

So what can a naive consumer do? The answers are easy:

 

1. NEVER let your diamond/s out of your sight once you've paid for them.

2. Have your jeweler set your diamond with you watching. If the jeweler does not have an on-site setter, ask to take the stone and setting to the setter yourself.

3. When having jewelry repaired or cleaned, try to find places that do the work on the spot in front of you.

 

If none of this is possible, have your stone appraised by an unbiased expert BEFORE you have it set. Let the jeweler know that you have had the stone appraised and that the appraiser will be checking the stone after it has been set. This will deter at least the jeweler from foul play and will make him responsible for any foul play that is done by someone else along the way.

 

Happy Shopping! :rolleyes:

Edited by MarriedToDiamonds
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Although there is a small risk for what you described, it’s actually quite low and I flatly disagree with your solution. How about this as an alternative:

 

#1 Only buy from a jeweler who has an ironclad refund policy in writing where if you decide you are unhappy for any reason within some reasonable amount of time (say 10-30 days), you can return it for a full refund. Buy on a credit card and, if they don’t honor the return policy, complain to the credit card issuer.

 

#2 Have it appraised by an independent appraiser (meaning someone who isn’t in the business of selling diamonds and who isn't working for the seller) during that return window. If it doesn’t match the documentation, return it for a refund. While you’re at it, if the documentation turns out to be inaccurate, which is a far more common occurrence, return it and keep on shopping. Have it appraised while you wait and while you watch so there’s no worry about the appraiser stealing it before you advance to step 3.

 

#3 Immediately bind an insurance policy based on the appraisal report rather than the paperwork provided by the selling jeweler. IF some future thief steals your diamond under the guise of a repair or some such thing, it will be a covered loss and the evidence will be the photographs and diagrams from this initial appraisal. This will cover you for all sorts of other risk as well like fire, theft, loss etc. This doesn’t eliminate the risks and filing an insurance claim can be a bit of a pain but it makes the bulk of it someone else’s problem. Full coverage for the risk you describe as well as all of these others costs about 1-2%/year and the companies are making good profits at that. Apparently they don't think the risk is all that high. You must travel with a very unfortunate set of friends.

 

#4 Chose your repair jeweler based on who can do the best work for the best price rather than who is willing to work with you hanging over their shoulder. You'll get better work and quite possibly pay less as well.

 

Your 'buying tips' site really needs some work by the way. I didn't dig all that deeply because it seems to be just a link farm but there are several bits on the main page that are flat out wrong.

 

ETA: For spam control reasons and in order to comply with the forum rules, Married deleted the links to the site we're discussing. It's allowed for me to post it but not her and so that readers are better able to follow the upcoming discussion,Here it is.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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I appreciate your input Neil - it's always good to get feedback - good or bad.

 

We're in Los Angeles - not in Denver - so I don't know how the market is out there, but here, there is plenty of opportunity for scams and theft and unfortunately, there are enough cases to cause concern.

 

You claim to disagree with my advice yet in your point #1 it sounds like you are just adding additional good points for the consumer to consider when purchasing a diamond. However, in my experience - iron clad return policies are usually offered by mall-type or chain stores. Sure, you could purchase a diamond from them, but you will pay top dollar for your diamond/s. However, if you go to the little guys - booths and smaller stores away from large malls - you have a better chance of paying a fair price for your diamond/s. These types of stores usually have some sort of return policy, though I don't believe it would qualify as iron clad. On the other hand, any jeweler who wants return business will give you a reasonable period during which you can return your diamond/s.

 

Your point #2 is a repeat of my advice - using different terms.

 

Regarding your point #3, I like your insurance policy advice but I do have one problem with it. You say that an insurance policy only costs about 1 to 2 percent. Well, this was certainly not the case when I got a quote from the last company I insured with (Mercury) and my current company (AAA).

 

Their basic home insurance policy comes with a flat $2500 coverage (though the amount does vary but not by much). If you wish to purchase additional insurance for your jewels, the cost is quite a bit higher than 1 or 2%. And even if it is just 1 or 2%, depending on the value of the jewels you are insuring, the cost to insure can really add up.

 

You also seem to have a problem with my Diamond Buying Tips blog. It would be really great if you specify what it is that is incorrect or not to your liking so I can make the changes - if helping is really what you had in mind when you made this comment. You really sound angry. You are an appraiser not a setter, correct?

 

Just so you know, 99% of the information on my Diamond Buying Tips blog comes from experts at places like Bluenile.com - the largest online diamond dealer in the world - and from other reputable sources. So I find it hard to believe that I provided misinformation but who knows, maybe you found a typo?

 

Vee

Edited by MarriedToDiamonds
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Thanks for the good advice. All those scams make me mad and make me recommend to my friends to just buy a cubic zirconia. What will they switch out a CZ with? A piece of glass? Youd probably be able to tell and if not, you are out just a few bucks, provided you didn't overpay for a "glorified" CZ. Thats the only real risk is getting ripped off by overpaying. Theres several websites that want around $100 a carat and some stores that charge $99 for a pair of 1 carat CZ stud earrings when they are worth $10 really. Of course the stores will point out how you are saving over $5000 by going CZ over a diamond!

 

You save a fortune, you don't need to insure CZ(why insure a $10 stone) no worries about conflict diamonds, no worries about it getting lost or stolen($10 is no big deal) and it looks very much like a diamond, maybe not quite as good as a flawless diamond.

 

I hear excuses such as "oh but it must be a diamond to prove our love" or CZ is just too cheap. Or that you need to buy something quality that won't fall apart. CZ with a hardness of a little over 8 isn't exactly going to fall apart. Yes it can chip, but so can diamond. Damage your CZ, just buy another $10 stone. Damage your diamond and you are out $5000+!

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777,

 

People buy diamonds for a variety of reasons but rarely is it because they find them to be inexpensive and there are very few applications where they could be described as necessary. For those who find the price to be a burden but who want a bit of bling for whatever reason, I agree that CZ can be a lovely choice. This doesn’t devalue the fact that some people love their diamonds, love what they stand for, love how they make them feel when they wear them and have the budget to support them. It's a big world and not everyone views things the same way you do.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Once the stone is in the ring, you will NEVER know the difference.

 

Your advice hinges on this comment that I flatly disagree with. Not only is it possible for you to tell the difference after it’s set and under your control, it’s essential to do so if you are going to address the risks you describe. You’re correct that this is a terribly important step to identifying the particular fraud you are warning about as well as other potential pitfalls later and your approach does nothing to address it.

 

Although it’s true that many of those booths down on Hill street who claim to be wholesalers don’t have return policies, my advice stands. I would not recommend buying from them for that very reason (often among others). The policy I'm looking for is a 100% refund for ANY reason if it's returned within the proscribed time in unaltered and undamaged condition. A policy of no refunds or refunds that are limited by what the seller considers to be a valid excuse should be a total deal killer. You are incorrect that these policies are limited to the full service mall stores. Every one of the dealers who advertises here, for example, has a return policy that meets these specs and I think you will find them to be very price competitive. Costco, Sears, QVC, Walmart, Blue Nile, Shaneco, Jared and most other major players offer a return policy of at least 7 days and all will accept payment in the form of credit cards. Of the specific stores that you’ve mentioned in your posts or blog, only DI doesn’t offer this.

 

Insurance premiums and coverage options vary from company to company, policy to policy and city to city but Jewelers Mutual publishes their entire rate sheet online so it’s easy to check. A $10k item with an address anywhere in California outside of LA county can be insured for $150/year with no deductible. Most other markets in the country are cheaper, LA is $200. Policies with deductibles are almost always less expensive and JM has lots of competitors with similar pricing structures. If you’re paying significantly more than that (1-2%) for a replacement type of policy you might consider shopping around for new insurance.

Here’s the JM rate chart www.jewelersmutual.com

 

Neil

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Neil - I think you are misunderstanding my some of what I wrote.

 

You wrote: "Your advice hinges on this comment that I flatly disagree with. Not only is it possible for you to tell the difference after it’s set and under your control, it’s essential to do so if you are going to address the risks you describe."

 

I didn't mean that an appraiser or jeweler could not differentiate between a diamond and CZ once it is set - or even a consumer who has taken the time to learn the difference. What I meant is that the average consumer has no idea what to look for in order to differentiate between the two. Furthermore, I think I have clearly emphasized the importance of getting a professional appraiser to appraise the stone.

 

I did not say that the booths on Hill St do not have a return policy - because most of them certainly do. However, it would not be an "official" or written policy in most cases and it would NOT be similar to anything offered by the large chain stores. It is closer to customer service rather than a return policy. I agree with you about the risks of purchasing from such booths but I also think it all depends on how you go about it. If you do your homework and get a certified diamond, you should be fine with any jeweler. I still think that to get the policy you're looking for, you will pay more for the stone/s. So the consumer needs to do the math and figure out which way is safer for that individual.

 

I agree with you 100% that no purchase should ever be made unless there is a suitable return policy and if there is no way to return at all - then I agree that the consumer should walk right out.

 

When I said that the iron clad return policies are limited to mall stores - I also said "or chain stores" which includes the stores you listed below (Costco, Sears, QVC, Walmart...). However, I did neglect to mention the online dealers who advertise here and elsewhere on the net.

 

Thanks for the jewelry insurance info. My home insurance policy makes it impossible to afford so I'll try the company you've recommended.

Edited by MarriedToDiamonds
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What I meant is that the average consumer has no idea what to look for in order to differentiate between the two.

 

 

Then the average customer could save a fortune and also not worry about insurance or crimes by going with CZ. If you can tell the difference and prefer a real diamond and can afford it and are willing to take the risk, that is your choice. More people need to realize they have an affordable option with CZ.

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You’ve edited the post to include a paragraph about the possibility of having it appraised before it’s set, which is a good revision, but you are still missing the point. The concern you raise in the headline is twofold. First, that the selling/setting jeweler might show and sell one stone and deliver another presumably worse one. The second is that a future repair jeweler may steal the stone and substitute an inferior one or an outright fake during the course of some unrelated repair.

 

After bring them up, neither risk is addressed through your proposed solution. Monitoring the bench jeweler while he/she works would not prevent a practiced thief from stealing a stone and it does not leave any opportunity for recourse unless you catch them ‘in the act’, maybe not even then. We’re talking about criminal charges and the burden of proof is on the prosecution. Where the recourse in the first case comes is by a qualified inspection AFTER it has left the jewelers control. If this inspection occurs within the return period, any shenanigans from the first jeweler become covered under the return policy and, in the extreme, by the credit card company. Criminal charges, if any, become the problem of the credit card company, not you. Every credit card processor I’ve ever encountered require that the return policy must not only be in writing but it must be on file in advance with the processor. You can’t get a credit card machine without having a written return policy. The jeweler can make the policy whatever they want and they can refuse to show it to the customer if they want but a claim that they have no refund policy is grounds to walk away. Most small stores will preprint it in the fine print of their invoices.

 

Appraising prior to setting helps to address misrepresentation in the first place, and I certainly encourage it, but does nothing at all to address the concern you bring up in your original post where the setter steals the stone between the sale and delivery.

 

Separating CZ and the other simulants from diamond isn’t really all that difficult but separating stones based on the grading is. ‘Certificates’ often make the problem worse rather than better. Unfortunately, GIA is not the biggest lab (that would be IGI). They’re not even second (EGL International). It is absolutely incorrect to say that if you buy a certified diamond you will be safe with any jeweler. Some of the worst misrepresentations I see involve ‘certified’ goods. It’s quite common for people to buy a ‘certified’ stone only to discover years later that it was overgraded by several grades or that the lab omitted important details that the salesperson just made up. This is one of the big reasons dealers like to use these alternative labs. The conclusion people leap to is exactly the fear you bring up that the stone has been switched in the interim when, in fact, the problem occurred during the initial sales presentation. Even after the customer figures out they've been had they still don't point to the right culprit.

 

Neil

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All due respect, but I think your husband got mixed up with the wrong crowd to leave you so jaded.

I've been in the diamond business for over 30 years, and I personally know of hundreds of sellers that are as honest as the day is long.

 

I've traveled extensively across the USA, and abroad selling to jewelers.

Sure, there are some charachters that are not trustworthy- but so many that are

The whole premise is insulting, and painting with too broad a brush.

Please show me one profession where EVERYONE is honest.

 

Going to Hill Street, or 47th Street in NYC is NOT a good way to get a representative sample. Having so many sellers in such close quarters encourages some aggressive selling techniques that are far less common in towns and cities across the country.

 

 

In terms of CZ's- I want my woman wearing diamonds, and she certainly feels the same way.

There are a lot of women who probably could not care- on the other hand, there are a lot of women that certainly do care about what they wear.

Putting up bad photos of CZ's and diamonds proves absolutely NOTHING.

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I was about to make the same comment about the little fuzzy photos.. Not that making accurate gem evaluations via photo is possible or desirable.. As for the rest of the post / blog, meh, it makes for good headlines.. But not much else..

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I disagree with many of the things written on that website......

 

Each of us is entitled to their own opinion- but there are statements made there that are misleading in many ways.

For example: You mention "Certified Diamonds"

ALthough the term is commonly used, it has no place in a technical, or educational discussion about diamonds.

A diamodn might have an AGSL, or GIA report calling it D/Internally Flawless.

In fact, neither of those organization "certifies" that opinion. They both publish reports on diamonds- and those in the trade use these reports to verify the grade of diamonds they are trading.

 

It's the essence of a statement like"get a certified stone and you'll be ok" that's the reason I point out this distinction.

Edited by diamondsbylauren
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So how does one get an accurate grade of a diamond? I collect coins and PCGS, NGC, ANACS are the best three coin graders. What are the best diamond graders? With something as expensive as diamonds, would it not be imperative to get an accurate, even if subjective grading?

 

 

The choice to go diamonds, CZ or other gems like corundum is the choice of the buyers in respect to their budget. I can't tell others what to do with their money, only that my budget and needs preclude me from buying diamonds. When/if I get a girlfriend and she wants a diamond, she can go ahead with her own money, I will refer her to your forum so she doesn't get ripped off.

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You guys are so brutal!

 

I am not out to mar the spotless reputations of honest jewelers and diamond dealers. I wanted to warn others so they don't experience what my friends went through. Even if I did not come from a diamond business family (and by the way, my father was a diamond cutter, my husband was a cutter then a dealer, my brother in law is a sought after gemologists, and the list goes on), I would still have an interest in warning other consumers.

 

The advice I gave comes from one consumer to another with an added edge of being in the business.

 

If you are honest in your dealings, you should not be offended by my blog. My husband read it and thought it was amusing at worst. He was not offended or worried even though our children's daily bread depends on jewelry retailers of all sizes.

 

If you recall, I even asked for feedback so I would have the opportunity to change any errors that I may have made.

 

I think you guys are just getting a kick out of busting the chops of the new kid on the block. Well, have fun. This is a free country and it's actually OK for people to agree to disagree.

 

And as for the "blurry pictures" - I thought that would just be a fun way to prove my point. I wasn't looking for any expert opinions. And for your information 70% of the voters on the poll selected the CZ as the real diamond!

 

Vee

Edited by MarriedToDiamonds
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Feedback:

Vee- what you've written seems to be a knock against an entire industry. For example, being involved with the business as you are, have you seen a CZ next to a diamond?

If you have, you'd know that there's lot of difference visually- although your supposed poll makes it impossible to see any difference.

 

Of course you're entitled to your opinion.

 

If I was a skeptical guy, I'd question how someone supposedly deriving their income from the industry would print such sensational claims.

I'd question how you let "friends" go into such horrible establishments that they got so ripped off.

 

Didn't they ask for your advice before going in to the crooked establishments you speak of?

 

If you are so involved in the jewelry industry, why call yourself a consumer? Being that your husband is in the business, do you buy from stores?

 

 

I'm not worried by your post- I'm sure many people do feel that there are a lot of dishonest people in the trade. Thankfully many people are open minded, and make decisions based on the people they encounter, as opposed to making broad generalizations.

I do find generalizations insulting because I know so many honest people who are in the diamond, and jewelry business.

 

I'd say a very common piece of advice we give here, is that consumers should get to know the jeweler they are going to choose, as opposed to attempting to be a diamond expert.

Rather than make generalizations, we discuss specific things to look out for in the representation of diamonds and jewelry.

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MarriedToDiamonds,

 

While I will let the others speak about the content of your website & messages, I find your blatant insertions of hyperlinks throughout all your messages to your own website objectionable. It's obvious search-engine spam, and clearly forbidden under the Forum Rules.

 

Please edit all your messages and remove the hyperlinks. You're welcome to stick around and participate in discussions, but you must refrain from such linking in the future. If the links are not edited out within 24 hours, I will delete this entire topic and ban you from the site.

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Moderator: the links were placed for a reason. This is not spam. My links are not much different from the links everyone on this site places at the bottom of their message. But rather than make excuses, I will gladly remove them.

 

diamondsbylauren: you are making very much the same assumptions about me as you claim I make about the diamond business.

 

Just because I'm part of the business does not by any means translate into a holier than thou attitude. Every business has its dark side.

 

If you doubt I'm from the business - well, I can't help you. I cannot reveal the address or name of our business because I simply don't do that on the open Internet. I don't need some nut to come knocking at our doors. So doubt away.

 

I personally am not from the diamond business - my profession is something else completely and so my opinions (not knowledge) will naturally come from me the consumer and not me the diamond wife.

 

My friends have purchased diamonds at locations other than where we live. They did ask for advice and one of them bought their engagement ring from my husband. However, two of them had their stones replaced at repair shops. Hope that answers your questions.

 

By the way, Neil accused my of changing my text after reading his comment - and that is not true. My recommendation to have jewelry/diamonds appraised by a professional was there from the first moment. Just wanted to clarify.

 

With all due respect to all you guys and your combined years of experience, I think you are very closed to others' opinions. I think you spend a lot of time within the business, and sometimes it's hard to see things from the outside. I have an advantage because I don't go downtown with my husband and sell diamonds.

 

And one last thing for 777 and diamondsbylauren: I own plenty of diamonds - not because I'm so crazy about them because I'm not. I have very simple taste - I prefer silver and costume jewelry - but my husband wants to give me gifts so I accept them with love. I can wear any piece sold by any jeweler with whom my husband does business, and I can pick any diamond of any size and quality to wear as a loaner for as long as I want. But guess what? My favorite piece is a large yellow "diamond" CZ ring. It was a sample ring my husband used to show a setting and I liked it so much that I took it from him. So don't assume that every woman prefers diamonds. We're not all the same.

 

I don't think I have much more to say about this but if you have other questions or feedback, please feel free to dish it out 'coz I can take it.

 

Have a nice day everyone! :rolleyes:

Edited by MarriedToDiamonds
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My cz looks remotely like the one that is supposed to be the real diamond, so I'm questioning whether these pictures are accurate. The pictures are such a poor representation of the sparkle and shine of both diamonds and czs. There are many people who can tell the difference between the two when visualized in person, and I agree with Hermann that this was a chance to promote the website for one's own interest. In fact this is what I thought of before Hermann wrote this ,and I am not a jeweler.

 

 

Thanks for this forum everyone. I enjoy reading the expert opinions! :rolleyes::huh::rolleyes:

Edited by paws
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Because I am really a nice person and not the monster you guys have made me out to be, I put a disclaimer at the very top of my blog. This is to prove to you guys that I care and I, unlike others, am not closed to new opinions and feedback. I can't give you the link because Hermann will get mad at me :rolleyes: but you can probably find it. I would really appreciate it if you guys took a look at it.

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Married.

 

I’m pleased you decided to stick around. Just for being so gracious, I’ll take a few moments to give you a bit more feedback on your site/advice.

 

You said:

“Figure out if you feel most comfortable buying a diamond from a huge chain, such as Diamonds Inernational, a smaller chain such as Robbin's Bros, your local mom & pop jewelry store, or buying diamonds direct from a wholesaler with a retail business.â€

 

DI is actually a rather small chain, smaller than Robbin’s Bros, but you’ve left out a whole panoply of other options, most obviously the Internet vendors and the ‘big box’ stores that sort of sell everything like Costco or Walmart. Describing retailers who claim to be wholesalers as ‘buying direct’ is incredibly deceptive. In general, it’s good to avoid specific company names if your making broad blanket statements like that and, if you are, at least spell their name right.

 

You said:

“Remember that the diamond’s cut can affect its worth. To determine whether or not the cut is good, move the diamond around and see how well it catches light.â€

 

It’s correct that cutting affects value but this is a terrible test. The ability of a prism to reflect light has as much to do with the light source as it does the prism (or diamond in this case). A consumer waving a stone around in an unknown environment and watching the flashes is fun and certainly not a problem and even a fun way to look at a diamond but it’s hardly a way to identify good cutting.

 

You said:

“Also, lay the stone over newspaper – if you can read the newspaper, there’s a good chance the stone is a fake. The many facets of a diamond should distort your vision of the text.â€

 

If you’re seriously suspecting the stone is a fake, this is a dreadful test. Actually, any customer who is seriously suspecting the stone to be a fake should head for the door. This advice is no better the second time you give it.

 

You said:

“The certificate will likely be from the Gemological Institute of America (GIA). They are the largest in the world.â€

Already mentioned in a previous post. This is simply not true and it’s the tip of an iceberg of trouble that’s much larger than what you’re warning about.

 

You said:

“If you don’t feel right about the purchase for any reason, walk away. However, if you like the diamond but need to have more assurance, get it appraised. Make sure the store will take back the diamond if the appraisal falls short of its quoted worth. And needless to say, do not use an appraiser from the same area or same store in which you purchased the diamond.â€

 

The store should take it back within a reasonable amount of time if it falls short for ANY reason, not just over the value conclusion. My observation as an appraiser is that, almost always, when a client is unhappy with what they learn in an appraisal session, it has to do with the grading of the stones and/or the craftsmanship of the mounting, not with the value conclusion although these things are often related. Although I agree that the appraiser shouldn’t be affiliated with the store or the deal, there is nothing wrong if there happens to be a qualified appraiser in the neighborhood. Actually, this saves on shipping. I’m all for people shipping things to Colorado but if they’ve got a local pro, they should use them.

 

There are more but that’s a start. Again, thanks for sticking around.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Thanks Neil - I'll start making these corrections immediately. I appreciate you taking the time to help me make these corrections.

 

Some questions:

 

1. I am not that familiar with online diamond sales. In fact, my husband does not even have a website. I think this is the reason I neglected to mention online jewelers. The question - if you or your colleagues know the answer - do people really purchase diamonds online?

 

2. The stone over newspaper thing - wouldn't this be a good thing to do as part of examining the stone - not necessarily when you suspect it's fake?

 

3. If GIA is not the largest - who is?

 

Vee

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You mentioned Blue Nile as the biggest online vendor (which is correct). They averaged close to $1,000,000/day in sales last year so I would take that as evidence that some people are actually buying diamonds online. :rolleyes: Every one of the advertisers who supports this site is an online jeweler and the category consistently is the highest performing in the industry. The magazines report that it’s about 7% of the retail marketplace now and it’s certain to grow. There's also a grey area like zales.com or tiffany.com where they are buying online from a dealer that is familiar because of the local store. Obviously this percentage is higher among Internet savvy shoppers like the people who are reading this forum or who are looking to your site for shopping advice. If hubby isn’t online he’s making a serious mistake. At the wholesale level the Internet has an even higher penetration than at retail. I would sooner disconnect my telephone than my website.

 

The biggest lab is IGI. Note: Bigger is not the same as better. The advice for consumers to stick with GIA and AGSL is sound.

 

No diamond that’s even close to decently cut will have a window that’s enough to read a newspaper through. Even really bad ones don’t have this. This test is an interesting way to separate CZ from diamonds and, more specifically, for separating CZ from some of the other less common simulants like YAG and Synthetic Rutile but for people who don’t know what to look for, it’s really not going to be helpful at all.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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WOW!! I had no idea that Blue Nile sold this much! My husband told me that Blue Nile is the largest but I didn't realize...

 

Hubby is looking to me to create a website for him but I've been making excuses...I guess I will eventually have to give in and help him out.

 

Thanks for all the rest. I have some work to do now...I have to go update my blog. :rolleyes:

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