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Interpreting Gia Report Plots


JHB04
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I've been shopping online looking at a lot of GIA reports. Obviously many internet vendors don't have photos of the actual stones because they don't have them on hand. I understand this. I've been able to compare a few stones with their corresponding reports in person, but not many.

 

My question is what do the most common inclusions translate to visually? What would they call a black speck of "carbon" on a GIA report? Any other explanations of commonly listed inclusions would be helpful.

 

Thanks.

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HI JHB04,

trying to figure out what the imperfections of the Diamond look like using the GIA plot, would be like trying to figure out what the person looks like and using a stick figure.

I mean, once you're looking at the actual Diamond, and you compare it to the GIA plot, you can understand (in some cases), why they put the lines and marks where they did.

But trying to do it the other way-that is looking at the plot, and figuring out what the actual Diamond looks like-that's impossible.

 

 

You mentioned that you understood that a lot of the sites that are offering these diamonds do NOT actually have the diamonds...... does that mean you're willing to accept that deficiency?

Understanding, for example, that the GIA plot is not really allow you to understand the diamonds imperfections, makes it seem crazy to me, for someone to buy a diamond from someone who's never seen it.

 

Good luck in your search, and I hope you get a diamond that you really love!

Edited by diamondsbylauren
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David,

Thanks for the response...

 

I understand that it's impossible to know what a diamond will look like exactly from a grading report. That's not really what I'm after. What I'm looking for is someone experienced at comparing these reports to actual stones to know what the GIA would call a black speck for example. Would that be a "crystal" or "pinpoint", or something else? A definition of terms is more what I'm looking for.

 

I understand from reading your post history that you're a strong proponent of dealers with access to the stones they're selling. I definitely see the value in this, but I'm also prepared to utilize the 30-day return policy if I'm not satisfied with what i get, for as many times as it takes to get a stone I like. And even at that, only for stones with a GIA report.

 

Thanks.

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The plots are worthless as they are one-dimensional and tell you absolutely nothing about the actual size, color, and most importantly the location of the inclusion(s).

 

You will also not be able to determine if that one carbon spot reflects and makes it look as if there are multiple spots through out the diamond.

 

If you're going to base a purchase on the plotted diagram, you're screwing yourself.

 

"See" the diamond and if you can't because you're shopping on-line, work with a vendor that can and will serve as your eyes and supply you with photos.

Edited by barry
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I wouldn't call them worthless, they just aren't useful for that. It's like looking at a topographic map and asking if the mountain will be beautiful. There are a few clues, especially if you've got a good idea what you like and how to read a topo but at the end of the day the answer to the question simply isn't there. You have to go climb the mountain and look.

 

Neil

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Hi JHB04,

Since you've read my posts, you probably know that I agree completely with my esteemed colleague, Barry.

 

 

What I'm looking for is someone experienced at comparing these reports to actual stones to know what the GIA would call a black speck for example. Would that be a "crystal" or "pinpoint", or something else? A definition of terms is more what I'm looking for.

What you are looking for can not be given to you by someone who can't see the diamond.

I'm really not trying to "bust your balls here". In fact, there are spots in diamonds that look white from one direction, and black from another direction-all depending on how you're holding the diamond.

So, anyone who has experience looking at gia reports knows that you can NOT tell anything from the plot-or let me rephrase that. Any information garnered from the plot is all but useless

Edited by diamondsbylauren
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I appreciate everyone's input. And I agree that you cannot determine the look or beauty of the stone by looking at the report or plot. But I feel my intentions may have been misunderstood. My question is simply this: if a diamond has a small black cluster of carbon in it, what would a grader call it in his report? I'm not referring to a dark spot from light reflection, but carbon that you would be able to see from almost any angle. Even a topographic map would show a ravine. I may not know what it looks like, but at least I'd know it was there.

 

I suppose one possible reason I've never seen "carbon" listed on a report is that most wouldn't bother grading a stone with such obvious inclusions. Is that a fair bet?

 

And my next question would be: If I went no lower than VS2 or SI1, would I even need to worry about seeing something like that?

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When people see a black spot in a stone, it’s not actually uncrystalized carbon. What that is is an included crystal of another mineral that appear dark against the clear diamond background. Corundum, and diamond are the most common included crystals but there are actually quite a few minerals that are possibilities. In almost all cases, the plotting diagram will list these inclusions as crystals but you cannot conclude from this that a crystal on the diagram will be dark in the stone. Some are, some are not.

 

Neil

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When people see a black spot in a stone, it’s not actually uncrystalized carbon. What that is is an included crystal of another mineral that appear dark against the clear diamond background. Corundum, and diamond are the most common included crystals but there are actually quite a few minerals that are possibilities. In almost all cases, the plotting diagram will list these inclusions as crystals but you cannot conclude from this that a crystal on the diagram will be dark in the stone. Some are, some are not.

 

Neil

 

Neil,

 

That was very helpful. Thanks.

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One thing that I've noticed over the years, looking at many plots is occasionally the grade can be heavy handed in doing the plot and when you actually look at the stone you might ask yourself what the heck they were plotting. Likewise I've seen quite a few stones out there that they didn't plot alot of what was in it as well.

It's definitely best if you can have a trusted vendor that knows what they are doing eye ball the actual stone for you and tell you what is in the stone and if it is eye clean or not.

 

GIA recommends this as well on their own lab reports in writing.

Edited by jan
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