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Thought From The Experts


asujames
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I'm new to buying diamonds as most I would assume who come here for help... I have a couple question for anyone who has time.

 

1. Which of the 4 Cs is most important? I mean shoudl I get a better color with a worse cut or go with a worse color with no inclusions .. how can I get my best bang for the buck

 

 

2. I asked the dealer that I was talking to to send me the best set of diamonds that woudl fit within my budget .. I was looking to spend at most $6,000 ... she sent me the following list. What diamond do people think is the best? Of course its hard to tell but based on what you do know which seems like the best choice.

 

View

Carat: 1.02

Color: G

VS2

Cut :Select Idealâ„¢

62.4/57

Price: 5758

Polish/sym EX/EX

GIA

 

View

1.00

E

VS2

Select Idealâ„¢

62.1/56

5466

EX/EX

EGL

 

View

1.01

F

VS2

Select Idealâ„¢

62.6/56

5662

EX/EX

EGL

 

View

1.01

G

VS2

Select Idealâ„¢

63.8/54

5375

EX/VG

GIA

 

View

1.01

G

VS2

Select Idealâ„¢

62.6/56

5444

VG/VG

GIA

 

View

1.01

G

VS2

Select Idealâ„¢

62.5/57

5689

EX/VG

GIA

 

thanks for the help

Edited by asujames
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James;

 

Cut is #1. A top cut quality diamond will refract more light and mask inclusions so that you can seriously consider SI clarities.

 

Impossible to advise based on the very rudimentary information provided by your dealer.

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Different people view diamonds differently. Cut is what makes diamonds look like a little fireball on your finger and for a lot of people this is the top requirement, but not everybody. For quite a few, size would be the #1 issue and for almost everybody price is a major driving force. Some customers will end up with an Ideal cut J/SI2, others will choose a much smaller D/VVS while still others will go for a G/I2 that’s been cut for weight for face up size. All can go away happy and feeling like they got the 'best' deal.

 

‘Select Ideal’ is a grade that’s been assigned by the dealer and can range from being helpful to meaning almost anything. This sort of term is badly abused and, if they aren’t prepared to explain in detail what they mean by it, assume that it means something like: “Some guy who may or may not have ever seen the stone says that it’s probably pretty good.†Evaluate the dealer as part of the process for deciding if this is useful information.

 

Neil

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As of January 1, 2006, GIA provides a Cut Grade for all round brillant diamonds as follows:

 

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

 

No doubt an "Excellent" or "Very Good" graded stone will be pretty but It is very difficult if not impossible to tell you how beautiiful, sparkly, or brilliant a diamond classified as either "Excellent" or "Very Good" will be without additional information.

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Unfortunately, the scale isn't as useful for shopping as it seems at first blush.

 

Most Excellents are pretty good

Many Very Goods are pretty good

Some Goods are pretty good

 

That makes for some interesting statistics but it's a bit more difficult to look at the report for an individual stone and make a sensible determination about whether you'll like the cutting. You may not care for a particular 'excellent' and you may adore a particular 'good'. If all you know is the grade then you haven't really learned all that much. As Barry points out, pre-2006 GIA reports as well as current reports describing stones other than modern round brilliant cuts don't contain this at all.

 

If you've got the average crown angle, average pavilion angle, star length and lower girdle length along with what you've provided you can estimate the GIA proportion grade yourself using a free utility at www.facetware.gia.edu The missing information isn't found on older GIA reports but the dealer may be able to get it if they actually have the stone.

 

The various EGL labs use a different scale entirely and don't even use the same scale from one lab to the next. They don't include it on all the available report formats. They give lots of stones some variation of 'ideal' or 'premium' but provide little information for what they mean by these terms. The result is that the EGL cut grades aren't really very helpful for most purposes.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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GIA on their own reports says this:

"The recipient of this report may wish to consult a credentialed Jeweler or Gemologist about the information contained herein. Since the color, clarity and cut grades of a diamond often represent ranges of appearance,when ever possible, individuals should view the diamond rather than relying solely on the report information while making purchasing decisions."

 

 

I wonder why they would put that on the lab report itself??

 

 

You may want to actually look at the diamond before you purchase it. Even GIA advises the consumers to do just that.

Edited by jan
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