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Why Would Anyone Want To Buy On-line Without Pictures?


AsscherLover
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Hello!

So, I have followed everyone's suggestions and asked for pictures from several online retailers, along with their EGL or GIA certs, and for a few, no problem! For others, its like I'm asking for a huge thing. They only want to do this if I'm totally sure I want to buy, and seem a bit reluctant.

 

My question is: Why would anyone want to buy online from someone they do not know without documentation and pictures? It just seems odd that these dealers wouldn't have pictures on file or be able to do this easily. But, it also goes back to what you all said, make sure they can get the diamond since many of these diamonds are on several sites and these dealers may not actually have them.

 

Now waiting for pictures...seeing if they will come.

 

A BIG Thank you to: Yekutiel of ID Jewelery, he was able to send me a picture of one asscher, but after talking to my boyfriend over the holidays, we need to trim down our budget for the diamond a bit, since we would still need to get it set. THANKS AGAIN!

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I'm no expert, but most of the time when I have asked an online dealer if the picture on their web site was the actual picture of the diamond, their reply is no. I immediately write these dealers off because they are either trying to hide something or too lazy to post a photo of the actual diamond. In any case, I don't want a lazy or mis-representing dealer on my short list....just my common sense take on it.

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Most of the online diamond sites don't have the diamonds in stock so that is why they can't take an actual photo of the stone.

Some of them also never see the diamond that is shipped to you.

 

There are a few that actually stock the diamonds they sell, and those can take photos and offer you more info on the stone before you purchase it like light performance, pictures etc.

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great point Jan!

almost every site selling diamonds does not even have any idea what the diamond they are selling looks like.

I can't understand how people could buy a diamond with no idea what it looks like.

 

We offer multiple photos of every diamond, we offer.

Here's a photo of an Asscher we're currently offering:

r2362c.JPG

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great point Jan!

almost every site selling diamonds does not even have any idea what the diamond they are selling looks like.

I can't understand how people could buy a diamond with no idea what it looks like.

 

We offer multiple photos of every diamond, we offer.

Here's a photo of an Asscher we're currently offering:

r2362c.JPG

 

Thanks, I always look forward to your posts. I did see your diamond on eBay today. I do love the cut, but it had a bit too much color in it for me. Maybe it just seems that way in pictures. I'm sure its a beautiful diamond. Maybe when I go to New York to visit some of the great dealers I have met here and through referrals, I can see some of your diamonds?

 

Thanks again!

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For the most part, the reason vendors do not show pictures has nothing to do with being lazy.

Rather, it has everything do do with the fact that they never see the stones they sell.

 

This is called "drop-shipping".

 

This read should be beneficial to you.

 

Best of luck!

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My question is: Why would anyone want to buy online from someone they do not know without documentation and pictures?

 

 

WHY you ask? :) That's a good question. A good friend of mine recently had her car break down and she was desperate to buy something. Knowing that I am a car nut she asked me to go with her to the honda dealership to buy a car. Now when it came down to buying a car, she basically just wanted 3 things, she wanted a silver car, with a jack that she could plug her IPOD in, and she wanted it to have 2 door because it "looked better" and she was determined to buy it that day without shopping around. When it came time to negotiating, she didn't ask about what package this car has or that, she just wanted it to have 2 doors in silver. She didn't care about special financing or didn't want to wait for a promotion or anything. She didn't even want to try and haggle with the price. She just wanted the damn car right now. It was very annoying, I don't know why she even bothered to bring me along LOL. She just let the stupid salesman nickel and dime her on everything with a horrible finance rate, etc, despite me pulling out my hair out in frustration and telling her to rethink her purchase. ;)

 

But anyhow the point to my story is, some people just don't care about details unfortunately, where as others will go around and kick the tires of 50 vehicles before they figure out what they finally want. To some buying a diamond is like buying a car, it's only for nessessity. Some guy has a woman who is nagging him for a ring and he just wants to shut her up once and for all LOL. Click. Buy. End of story. You can only lead the horse to water, you can't force him to drink :)

Edited by Adylon
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Here’s a slightly less critical view.

 

Dropshipping is a financially very efficient system. The original owner retains possession of the stone until it sells, they have the opportunity to offer the stone for sale through a wide variety of different outlets that may be quite different from one another giving them access to a large number of potential shoppers and the retailer has a low financial stake in the stone and can therefore work on low margins. All of this is based on the assumption that all diamonds of a particular set of specs are basically identical and that no significant value is being added by the retailer.

 

Given this set of assumptions, it makes sense. If all 1.00ct/VS2/F/rounds are the same and the dealer is expected to do nothing other than shuffle paper, than buying a ‘certified’ diamond sight unseen isn't such a bad plan. This idea is widely promoted both on the Internet and in some stores.

 

The problem, as I’m sure you know if you’ve been reading this or any other forum for any length of time is that these assumptions are false. All VS2’s aren’t the same. All G’s aren’t the same. ‘Ideal’ is a remarkably slippery concept. All GIA/1.02ct./VS2/G/excellent cut/excellent polish/excellent symmetry aren’t even the same. The next level of separation is more work and costs money and not everyone wants to do it, just like Yosef’s friend with the car. She could have shopped differently but the attributes that she valued (color, door count, audio ports, speed of transaction) didn't require it. The other assumption, that the dealer adds no value is also problematic. SOME dealers add no value but others do quite a bit for their money. What I count as a good dealer is of enormous help in that next layer of separation in getting exactly what you want and in avoiding nasty surprises at the end. Good service and support is not a free service although it’s rarely separately billed.

 

So, why do people buy online (or in a store) without much information? Because they believe that the information they’ve already received is sufficient to make the decision and they think that they’re getting a ‘good deal’ this way. Maybe they are, maybe they’re not. I can think of dealers where it would work pretty well to ring them up, give them a 1 minute description on the phone of what you want and this will almost certainly result in a sound offer and an acceptable stone in hand within a day or 2. You can do the whole deal on a coffee break if you want. No report scans, no pictures, no nothing beyond a trustworthy dealer. There are others where an abbreviated information set is a terrible sign of trouble to come. Blanketly trusting a dealer when you know nothing about them beyond that their prices look comparatively attractive in some search engine strikes me a crazy but a lot of people do it and a significant number of them walk away happy. Ignorance is bliss I suppose. (ok, so maybe I'm not less cynical)

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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So, why do people buy online (or in a store) without much information? Because they believe that the information they’ve already received is sufficient to make the decision and they think that they’re getting a ‘good deal’ this way. Maybe they are, maybe they’re not. I can think of dealers where it would work pretty well to ring them up, give them a 1 minute description on the phone of what you want and this will almost certainly result in a sound offer and an acceptable stone in hand within a day or 2. You can do the whole deal on a coffee break if you want. No report scans, no pictures, no nothing beyond a trustworthy dealer. There are others where an abbreviated information set is a terrible sign of trouble to come. Blanketly trusting a dealer when you know nothing about them beyond that their prices look comparatively attractive in some search engine strikes me a crazy but a lot of people do it and a significant number of them walk away happy. Ignorance is bliss I suppose. (ok, so maybe I'm not less cynical)

 

Neil

 

Great summary Neil. Experts focused on consumer protection get a little crazy at the drop-ship concept. We're just very protective and we want to crawl all over any diamond we intend to sell so we're 100% familiar with it on behalf of the buyer. These are natural crystals from the earth and letters and numbers don't do one of these precious snowflakes justice. A data stream will not reveal possible shortcomings (the reason many of us warn against drop-shippers) but even if there were no possible shortcomings I think those of us who have a passion for diamonds and diamond-lovers want to see & feel what it is we're sending to the hopeful guy or gal on the other side of the counter, or other end of the phone line.

 

Certainly there's risk in buying from a drop-shipper. I think the negative reactions you see from tradesmen (and women) who reject that model go deeper than risk though.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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I never cease to be amazed at how consumers at the flick of the wrist pay thousands of dollars for a diamond they have never seen and have no clue as to how it looks and which is just drop-shipped to them direct from the actual manufacturer with the vendor operating as the go-between.

 

Diamonds are like fingerprints; no two are alike regardless of the lab grading reports showing you the same numbers and specs.

 

Neil is absolutely correct: Calling in diamonds on behalf of our customers at our expense and time, doing the data workups and then working with the Customer is intensive and hard work but in our opinion the only and proper way to sell diamonds on the Internet.

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Thanks for your help everyone! From my on-line research, I was able to find 3 companies that had diamonds on their site that fit my parameters, two out of 3 were very hesitant at sending me pictures or the actual GIA report. One even said "Go to my site and look at an example report" I had also contacted about 5 more once I found diamonds that were close to what I was looking for, and most wanted me to call them first. So...when I get a chance, I'll pick up the phone and call. I was just hoping to get the information I needed, package it up, and send to my boyfriend to pick

 

I'll keep you all posted! Going to New York in a few weeks to check out some places I have been e-mailing.

 

Wish me luck!

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