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First Time Buyer Needs Help!!!


jrb25
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First time buyer here and I need some help! I am thinking about buying the following stone:

 

2.00 carat, GIA cert, SI2, I color, Cut-Very Good, Polish-Excellent, Symmerty-Very Good, No FL.

 

I know that it is hard to tell by these specs, but what do you think the price range should be and any thoughts on the stone in general?Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

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That’s a popular set of parameters. You’ll find dozens of offers for superficially similar stones behind the link at the top of the page titled ‘find online jeweler’. I say ‘superficially’ because, like the stone you’re considering, I can’t see any of those either. GIA-Very Good covers a pretty big range and different dealers will offer different sorts of programs to sweeten the deal. Most of what you see advertised here are pretty bare-bones sorts of offers. Even if you’re not planning on shopping online they can be useful in getting a feel for what things cost.

 

Neil

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Thanks! What about the I color? I was kinda nervious about going that low on the color scale. Any thought? Also, could you explain girdle thickness to me and what a good stones thickness should be?

 

The face-up color appearance will depend on its cut quality. VG covers quite a broad range; there are some great lookers and some real woofers in that grade. Do you have more specifics?

 

The girdle is where the crown meets the pavilion. A diamond should have a girdle thick enough to avoid chipping/durability issues, but not so thick that it is carrying a lot of of the stone's weight. Girdle thickness of thin, medium or slightly thick (and any combo of the three min-max) will earn top marks in any lab system.

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The face-up color appearance will depend on its cut quality. VG covers quite a broad range; there are some great lookers and some real woofers in that grade. Do you have more specifics?

 

The girdle is where the crown meets the pavilion. A diamond should have a girdle thick enough to avoid chipping/durability issues, but not so thick that it is carrying a lot of of the stone's weight. Girdle thickness of thin, medium or slightly thick (and any combo of the three min-max) will earn top marks in any lab system.

 

 

What other specifics would you need? What do you mean when you say "VG covers quite a broad range"? Thanks!

Edited by jrb25
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What other specifics would you need? What do you mean when you say "VG covers quite a broad range"? Thanks!

 

The GIA cut grade is based on measurements. Certain configurations are known to result in more brightness, dispersion and scintillation than others. Using table size for example, diamonds with 52-62% tables may qualify for the EX grade if coupled with optimal crown & pavilion angles. If the table is in that range but the c/p angles are not deemed optimal it's reduced to VG.

 

That's a simplification, since there are a dozen factors that determine the cut grade. If you have the measurements it's a start and a decent predictor of light return but the measurements don't take cut precision into consideration. A photo showing light return/cut precision (ideal-scope/ASET) is always a wise idea. For these large purchases you should expect all this information.

 

Some VGs look pretty darn good while others are terrible... In fact, within the EX grade there are some dogs (again depending on measurements). This is why it's reasonable to expect more info.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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There are 5 grades in the GIA cut grading system.

 

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Poor

 

In theory, these are roughly equally distributed groups based on a study they did where they showed hundreds of stones a few at a time to a thousand or so people who forced ranked them in terms of what they liked better than what. They did several hundred thousand observations and statistically observed what was popular and what wasn’t among their sample subjects. The results look something like this:

 

Excellent: Most people placed it in the top 20%

Very Good: Most people placed it in the top 40%

Good: middle 20%

Fair: Most people didn’t like it and placed it in the bottom 40%

Poor: Most people saw it as defective. Bottom 20%

 

Realistically, Poor doesn’t exist in the market. It would be hard to find one even if you wanted it because modern cutters simply don’t produce them. They don’t sell well enough. Fair is close to as rare. They’re out there but they don’t have GIA paperwork because the dealers choose a different lab precisely for this reason. Add to this that cutters are pretty skilled people and they don’t like to be called just ‘good’ and you get a further bias towards excellent and away from Good. Most Good stones on the market are either cut to maximize weight at the expense of brilliance or were cut before the rules were developed

 

This leaves you that with GIA graded round brilliants, 2/3 or more of them are X or VG. That’s a big range. Your stone may be a fireball, but saying that it’s probably in the top 2/3 isn’t saying much even if it is correct.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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Thanks for all the help! I just saw the stone and it is beautiful! It is a bright white stone that dances all over the place! I looked at it through a loupe and as far as I can tell, it is very clean. It does have a small white feather that is slightly visable just off the crown. I know that most diamonds aren't perfect (that's what makes them diamonds and unique), but should I be worried about this? Am I just obsessing over nothing?

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Here are the numbers I pulled from the GIA site. Any thoughts? Thanks!

 

Report Type: GIA Diamond Grading Report

Date of Issue: September 18, 2007

Round Brilliant

Measurements: 8.03 - 8.11 x 4.90 mm

Carat Weight: 2.00

Color Grade: I

Clarity Grade: SI2

Cut Grade: Very Good

Depth: 60.7 %

Table: 64 %

Crown Angle: 33.5°

Crown Height: 12 %

Pavilion Angle: 41.6°

Pavilion Depth: 44.5 %

Star length: 55 %

Lower Half: 80 %

Girdle: Slightly Thick to Thick, Faceted

Culet: None

Polish: Excellent

Symmetry: Very Good

Fluorescence: None

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Here are the numbers I pulled from the GIA site. Any thoughts? Thanks!

 

Report Type: GIA Diamond Grading Report

Date of Issue: September 18, 2007

Round Brilliant

Measurements: 8.03 - 8.11 x 4.90 mm

Carat Weight: 2.00

Color Grade: I

Clarity Grade: SI2

Cut Grade: Very Good

Depth: 60.7 %

Table: 64 %

Crown Angle: 33.5°

Crown Height: 12 %

Pavilion Angle: 41.6°

Pavilion Depth: 44.5 %

Star length: 55 %

Lower Half: 80 %

Girdle: Slightly Thick to Thick, Faceted

Culet: None

Polish: Excellent

Symmetry: Very Good

Fluorescence: None

 

It makes perfect sense. Those numbers explain the bright, white look you described: The largish table will make it appear 'spready' (big) and the low crown angle creates a crown height that is lower than near-Tolkowsky makes (12% as opposed to 14-16%). This reduces the colored flashes in favor of more, bright, whiteness. I bet it faces up more colorless than other Is you saw. If you like this look there's nothing wrong.

 

As a jeweler I would suggest you compare it, side by side, with a similar-sized round or two that has smaller table/higher crown (in the 56%, 15% range) if you are able. Be sure you prefer the big white 'look' to the more colorful-sparkle look. Do this through several lighting conditions, not just under jewelry store spotlights. Let us know how it's going.

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