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Chime In On This Rock


rocknsock
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I've been looking at a diamond and was wondering what all your thoughts are on it.

 

Here are the specs:

GIA H&A

7.05-7.08x4.32mm

cut GIA excellent

Round Brilliant

1.30 H VS1

table 56%

pavillion depth: 43%

crown angle 35.0

crown height % 15.5%

girdle: thin t F

total depth: 61.1%

polish excellent

symmetry excellent

flourescence none

culet none

 

This diamond would be mounted in a platinum setting. Any criticisms or comments? What would you say is a fair price for this stone? Thanks in advance for all your help!

Edited by rocknsock
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There’s a database at the top of the page titled ‘find online jeweler’ where you can look up offers of diamonds using some of the specs you’ve provided. There will be quite a range of stones for a particular weight/clarity/color and I would recommend sorting by price by clicking on that column header. The better cut and more accurately graded ones will tend to be the most expensive. This’ll give you a pretty good idea what a comparable stone would cost from one of the folks who advertise here. Bear in mind that the internet vendors tend to be cheaper than most storefront jewelers. This has to do with the cost of employees, rent and similar things that can be done less expensively elsewhere. If they really want to the local stores can match the prices here but usually it’s 10-20% more. By all means use one of these offers to beat them up if their price is out of line.

 

It’s worth noting that GIA doesn’t grade H&A. If this attribute is important to you then this claim is coming from somewhere else and it’s worthwhile to figure out where. Not everyone uses this term in the same way and some are way more specific than others about it.

 

Neil

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Rock,

 

There is no diamond that achieves a "GIA H&A Grade"

 

Any stone may very well exhibit beautiful and precise H&A patterning regardless of who certified the stone, but not because GIA said so.

They don't.

 

Therefore, I would suggest you ask your jeweler to actually showcase the H&A pattern for you (live or via a photograph).

 

Regards,

Edited by DiamondMaven
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Thanks for the replies. I just wanted to clarify that I do know that GIA does not specify H&A. The seller does not claim that GIA certified this as H&A. I know if someone did... it'd be BS. Sorry to confuse you. The seller has pictures of the hearts and arrows through a viewer. So from all indications, it is cut as an H&A.

 

I was more interested in your thoughts on the measurements, angles, depth, table, etc... of this particular stone. I know measurements aren't the canon for telling whether the diamond is "good" or not. I am more interested in whether you would recommend this stone or even give this stone to a loved one. Is there anything about the measurements that you might be annoyed/concerned with. Also, I'd like to know what your thoughts are on whether I will be annoyed by the color of an H. The stone will be set in platinum. I've read that an H set in a ring will look white face up. However, I've viewed some loose H's in house lighting and I quickly noticed the tint. I think an F is a little out of my budget and a G is pushing the limits of what I want to spend. But is a G in a setting going to be noticeably whiter than an H?

 

BTW... the stone I am looking at is an internet stone from what looks like a reputable seller with plenty of feedback.

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I used the diamond search and found the exact diamond I am talking about on Mondera.com, but that's not the original place I found the diamond. Is mondera a drop-ship type of store?

Yes.

it's likely that if the diamond is on the lists, the person actually holding it is not offering it to the public.

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Thanks for the replies. I just wanted to clarify that I do know that GIA does not specify H&A. The seller does not claim that GIA certified this as H&A. I know if someone did... it'd be BS. Sorry to confuse you. The seller has pictures of the hearts and arrows through a viewer. So from all indications, it is cut as an H&A.

 

I was more interested in your thoughts on the measurements, angles, depth, table, etc... of this particular stone. I know measurements aren't the canon for telling whether the diamond is "good" or not. I am more interested in whether you would recommend this stone or even give this stone to a loved one. Is there anything about the measurements that you might be annoyed/concerned with. Also, I'd like to know what your thoughts are on whether I will be annoyed by the color of an H. The stone will be set in platinum. I've read that an H set in a ring will look white face up. However, I've viewed some loose H's in house lighting and I quickly noticed the tint. I think an F is a little out of my budget and a G is pushing the limits of what I want to spend. But is a G in a setting going to be noticeably whiter than an H?

 

BTW... the stone I am looking at is an internet stone from what looks like a reputable seller with plenty of feedback.

 

By the numbers it looks nice. However, having numbers on a diamond is no better than having a description of a blind date. Actual photos, especially proof of performance, are far more telling... And meeting her in person, err, I mean seeing the diamond in person, is the only way to know if it lives up to the description and images.

 

43% pavilion depth with no culet translates to appx 40.75 pavilion angle (any reason you cited depth instead?). The limitations about numbers are that we know nothing about the variations in cutting. For example, 40.75 is in the center of the sweet spot for pavilion angles, but that number is an average of eight measurements, as is the crown angle. Additionally we don't have minor proportion info. While they will typically be appropriate on diamonds with nice major proportions, lower girdle length can make a huge difference in the appearance of the diamond. You say it has a GIA Excellent cut grade - are the star and lower half numbers included? (remembering, again, that they are averages of eight measurements).

 

If you have this diamond's H&A images, an ideal-scope or ASET image or other performance proof we can give more meaningful feedback - and we'll cheer it on if it looks promising. Consistency and/or variations make themselves seen in actual images, particularly reflector images. Without them a list of numbers, no matter how hopeful, means little.

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Re: Color.

 

Color is a bandwidth and it gets wider as color descends. This is why you'll sometimes hear the terms "high J" or "low J" assigned by traders. Whereas DEF are incredibly close to each other and G-H is also pretty narrow, things widen a bit in I-J and below. Very color-sensitive people sometimes pick up a grade of difference but it's incredibly rare for anyone outside a lab environment doing grading to subdivide within one color. Every person is different though, and some people are scary-color-sensitive.

 

The reason I say the above is because your H question depends on the individual diamond and how it "faces up:" If the diamond is extremely well cut light will get in and out with more intensity, so there is less color entrapment. This causes the face-up value of well-cut near-colorless diamonds to approach colorless. It's why you'll hear people talk about how "white" a certain near-colorless stone appears face-up, while another of the same grade appears less "white." In our experience well-cut diamonds in the G-J range astonish most people at how well they face up compared to average cuts of the same grade (especially non GIA/AGS stones which are typically graded softer). Still, every person is different and every diamond is different. You will have to do some legwork yourself to know how it suits you. As you do, be sure you're comparing apples to apples. Wear neutral clothing and view the diamonds for color away from spotlighting - diffused fluorescent light is preferable. Be sure your comparing AGS/GIA equivalents and know the cut-quality of the diamonds you're seeing.

 

With all that said...From experience a well-cut AGS/GIA H is a great selection for appearance and for the pocketbook since, unless you're comparing it directly to a DEF stone side by side, it appears colorless face-up. Additionally, almost no color is detectable from the side unless you're scrutinizing it closely.

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Thanks for the replies. I just wanted to clarify that I do know that GIA does not specify H&A. The seller does not claim that GIA certified this as H&A. I know if someone did... it'd be BS. Sorry to confuse you. The seller has pictures of the hearts and arrows through a viewer. So from all indications, it is cut as an H&A.

 

I was more interested in your thoughts on the measurements, angles, depth, table, etc... of this particular stone. I know measurements aren't the canon for telling whether the diamond is "good" or not. I am more interested in whether you would recommend this stone or even give this stone to a loved one. Is there anything about the measurements that you might be annoyed/concerned with. Also, I'd like to know what your thoughts are on whether I will be annoyed by the color of an H. The stone will be set in platinum. I've read that an H set in a ring will look white face up. However, I've viewed some loose H's in house lighting and I quickly noticed the tint. I think an F is a little out of my budget and a G is pushing the limits of what I want to spend. But is a G in a setting going to be noticeably whiter than an H?

 

BTW... the stone I am looking at is an internet stone from what looks like a reputable seller with plenty of feedback.

 

By the numbers it looks nice. However, having numbers on a diamond is no better than having a description of a blind date. Actual photos, especially proof of performance, are far more telling... And meeting her in person, err, I mean seeing the diamond in person, is the only way to know if it lives up to the description and images.

 

43% pavilion depth with no culet translates to appx 40.75 pavilion angle (any reason you cited depth instead?). The limitations about numbers are that we know nothing about the variations in cutting. For example, 40.75 is in the center of the sweet spot for pavilion angles, but that number is an average of eight measurements, as is the crown angle. Additionally we don't have minor proportion info. While they will typically be appropriate on diamonds with nice major proportions, lower girdle length can make a huge difference in the appearance of the diamond. You say it has a GIA Excellent cut grade - are the star and lower half numbers included? (remembering, again, that they are averages of eight measurements).

 

If you have this diamond's H&A images, an ideal-scope or ASET image or other performance proof we can give more meaningful feedback - and we'll cheer it on if it looks promising. Consistency and/or variations make themselves seen in actual images, particularly reflector images. Without them a list of numbers, no matter how hopeful, means little.

 

 

Wow thanks for the input Johnquixote! :D Much appreciated!

 

No reason I cited pavillion depth. I just copied what I saw from the GIA report check. However the pavillion angle is 41.. not quite the 40.75 you stated. Also the crown angle sits at 35. Additional info... pavillion facet is 80%, crown facet 50%. All I have is a 10X photo right now.

 

I'll see what I can do about providing any other pictures.

 

The info you gave on color was great! Makes me a little more confident about an H versus a G.

post-114280-1196297671.jpg

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Wow thanks for the input Johnquixote! :D Much appreciated!

 

No reason I cited pavillion depth. I just copied what I saw from the GIA report check. However the pavillion angle is 41.. not quite the 40.75 you stated. Also the crown angle sits at 35. Additional info... pavillion facet is 80%, crown facet 50%. All I have is a 10X photo right now.

 

I'll see what I can do about providing any other pictures.

 

The info you gave on color was great! Makes me a little more confident about an H versus a G.

 

You're welcome. :) A couple of follow-up comments.

 

A 41 degree pavilion angle, coupled with the 35 crown, is not quite as good as 40.75 (which is a central 'sweet spot') to me - especially when we don't know the eight detailed measurements. So you know, GIA rounds some numbers on their reports: They report in increments of 0.2 degrees on pavilion angle and a frustrating 0.5 degrees crown angle. To correlate to a 41 pa with accuracy the pavilion depth should actually read 43.5% with no culet present...or the pavilion angle should be listed as 40.8. This is not a huge deal, just some confounding elements of GIA's practice of rounding.

 

The measurements are still fine - but the 10X photo does not show a diamond that would have a Hearts & Arrows level of precision in a H&A viewer. See this overview, and click on this graphic for examples of what cut-focused specialists would consider worthy of a H&A premium.

 

H&A precision is not a requirement for diamond beauty, but if you are paying a premium you should expect more than average to good optical symmetry.

 

Glad to help on color - if it's a premium cut H you shouldn't have a problem. The only flag I can see is the claim of H&A... It would be great to see an ideal-scope or ASET image to verify precision even more as well as light performance, which is actually the most important component.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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