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Need Opinion On This Diamond


papasweets
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GIA Certified (4/07)

Shape: Round Brilliant

Measurement: 7.07 - 7.11 X 4.42mm

Weight: 1.35c

Color: F

Clarity: SI2 (It has a white inclusion - looks like an air bubble - on the table, but I can only see it with 10X mag)

Cut: EX

Polish: VG

Symmetry: VG

Flr: None

Table: 57%

Depth%: 62.3%

Pavilion Angle: 41.4

Pav Depth: 44%

Crown Angle: 34.5

Crown Depth: 15%

Girdle: Thin to Slightly Thick (faceted)

Culet: 0

Price: $7100

 

I saw this one in person at an AGS Member and was very impressed...How do these numbers look?

Edited by papasweets
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GIA Certified (4/07)

Shape: Round Brilliant

Measurement: 7.07 - 7.11 X 4.42mm

Weight: 1.35c

Color: F

Clarity: SI2 (It has a white inclusion - looks like an air bubble - on the table, but I can only see it with 10X mag)

Cut: EX

Polish: VG

Symmetry: VG

Flr: None

Table: 57%

Depth%: 62.3%

Pavilion Angle: 41.4

Pav Depth: 44%

Crown Angle: 34.5

Crown Depth: 15%

Girdle: Thin to Slightly Thick (faceted)

Culet: 0

Price: $7100

 

I saw this one in person at an AGS Member and was very impressed...How do these numbers look?

 

 

More importantly than the numbers, how did you think the diamond looked in person? Was it white and sparkly, were you able to compare it next to others stones that were cut nicely with lab reports? No one is going to ask you about the numbers while it is being worn.

 

As far as the numbers it may have just a slight bit of fat on the pavilion depth. Not sure how it would effect the light performance without testing it. Each diamond is individual. You could have similar numbers yet different light performance because all 57 facets come into play on the diamond, not just a few average numbers.

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HI All,

I'd ask what Jan did- you saw the diamond in person- what did YOU think?

That's the absolute MOST important test.

I would not worry about the pavilion angle- again- you've seen it.

Furthermore, I'd say that the price seems in line.

Size above 1.25cts are truly hard to find. Remember, the per carat price jumps at 1.50cts.

 

 

Enjoy!!

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GIA Certified (4/07)

Shape: Round Brilliant

Measurement: 7.07 - 7.11 X 4.42mm

Weight: 1.35c

Color: F

Clarity: SI2 (It has a white inclusion - looks like an air bubble - on the table, but I can only see it with 10X mag)

Cut: EX

Polish: VG

Symmetry: VG

Flr: None

Table: 57%

Depth%: 62.3%

Pavilion Angle: 41.4

Pav Depth: 44%

Crown Angle: 34.5

Crown Depth: 15%

Girdle: Thin to Slightly Thick (faceted)

Culet: 0

Price: $7100

 

I saw this one in person at an AGS Member and was very impressed...How do these numbers look?

 

 

More importantly than the numbers, how did you think the diamond looked in person? Was it white and sparkly, were you able to compare it next to others stones that were cut nicely with lab reports? No one is going to ask you about the numbers while it is being worn.

 

As far as the numbers it may have just a slight bit of fat on the pavilion depth. Not sure how it would effect the light performance without testing it. Each diamond is individual. You could have similar numbers yet different light performance because all 57 facets come into play on the diamond, not just a few average numbers.

 

 

 

 

 

:huh:

please allow me to ask this question...aren't numbers important, in terms of getting best value? after all, at the end of the day, it may still represent something to hand down to a beloved relative, or if worse comes to worse (knock on wood this doesn't happen), to re-sell in case of need. as a jeweller, don't you think that customers deserve to get value for their money?

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The question being answered above is apparently not the one you’re asking. I’ll try to help.

 

Yes, numbers matter.

 

When you look at one of the big databases listing lots of diamond prices they are generally categorize by shape, weight, clarity and color. There’s an opportunity for a bit of self-education here. Open up a separate browser window, come back to diamond.info and search for1.33-1.37ct, F/SI2 round brilliant using the ‘find online jeweler’ database at the top of the page. This produces roughly 80 offers ranging in price from $4233 - $7857 that are roughly comparable to the one you're considering. That’s close to a factor of 2 span from the same half dozen or so dealers so the difference is going to be something else, right? What is it?

 

This is the reason for the answers above. In general, this difference in the offers is based on 3 things. Grading accuracy, cut quality and dealer services.

 

Grading accuracy is a tough one to pin down. The lab report represents an opinion. Since you can’t see the stones or talk to the grader (at least for the ones listed here), you are relying 100% on the lab. The demising line between SI2/I1 and F/G are constantly argued and even within the reports of a particular lab they are tough to nail down. That’s why choosing the correct lab is such a good step. You did well with GIA. Go back to the search results and sort by price by clicking on the column header. You’ll notice that, in general, the expensive ones have GIA paper and the cheap ones have someone else, usually EGL. GIA looks to be about the top half and we’re going to ignore everything else. We’re going to assume that the GIA assumptions are correct for weight, clarity and color but bear in mind that this is a critical assumption and we’ll get back to this later.

 

Cut is another hotly debated topic. GIA has a 5 step grading scale the peaks at ‘excellent’. Dealers can and do charge more for ‘excellent’ and the top stones will mostly have that pedigree. The one the jeweler showed you has this. We’re going to make two more critical assumptions here, namely that ‘excellent’ is better than ‘very good’ and that all Ex’s are equally lovely or at lease equally valuable. Again, we'll address these assumptions later. This is an area that’s a bit more difficult to filter from the database but if you choose a few stones from, say, the top ¼ of the results page and click through to the dealers page about them and look at the ad. Some give you a lot more information than others but a fair number will allow you to look at a scan of the report. Be aware of others that will simply make up grades using their own scale. For example, GIA doesn’t have an ‘Ideal’ in their scale. If you can’t see the report or something looks like BS, move on to the next one. There are plenty. I’m not going to take the time go do this but my guess is it’ll produce a dozen or so stones that range in asking prices by +/- 10% or so and in your case it’ll be in that $7100 range, right where your jeweler is.

 

That’s pretty tight.

 

So now how do you choose? Dealer service. Dealers are not all the same. Some will bring in the stone and personally inspect it for you and add their expert consultation about all of those critical assumptions given above. Some will buy what they consider to be the best stones for their clients and carry them in inventory. One of these is what your AGS jeweler has done and yes, this adds value. Dealers also add value by offering things like convenient delivery, tradeup programs, access to their designers, financing and all manner of other creative solutions. Some have lots of techy type education and others will offer you friendly one-on-one conversation. What you're looking for is one that provides the level of service you want for a price you're willing to pay and each has a slightly different approach. Whether these elements are valuable will be different for each customer. For some these things are terribly important while others count them as irrelevant. No, they’re not free but they are usually sold as part of the package deal. This is the first place that you address the assumptions made above. Ask the dealer. This is part of what you're paying them for.

 

The final step is to get it appraised by an independent appraiser. This is the 'trust but verify' step where you backup or refute the advice given to you by the dealer and it applies whether you buy online or at a local store. The dealer's job is to tell you things that result in a sale. The appraisers job is to tell you the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. These may work out to be the same things but often there are subtle but important differences.

 

Notice that in the above page and a half I’ve said nothing at all about what stones are best, which are the most beautiful or even which are the most valuable. That’s because these things include elements that cannot be boiled down to numbers. Will it impress her friends and family? Will it make her uncomfortable to wear such an ostentatious thing or will it embarrass her because she thinks you chose one that looks cheap? These are not gemological properties but they are incredibly important and only you can answer them. Diamonds are a crappy bank account but they are an investment in your relationship. If your beloved can look at her hand every day for the rest of her life and be reminded that she is loved then you got your moneys worth and then some. If you have to resell it next year to some shark for 50 cents on the dollar then you didn’t.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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