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cradamson123
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I am thinking about buying a ring and this is one in my price range. Now I am purchasing on the internet so having said that I havent seen it in person but they assure me it is eye clean. Let me know what you think of this diamond I am no expert. EGL classification has been used. Thanks to all who reply.

 

1st

1.5 c

7.32-7.26 x 4.32 mm

width 63%

depth 59.3%

crown 12%

pavillion 41%

thickness very thick faceted

polish good to very good

symmetry good to very good

cutlet none

clarity SI1

color F

flouresence none

No comments on the cut grade

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I am thinking about buying a ring and this is one in my price range. Now I am purchasing on the internet so having said that I havent seen it in person but they assure me it is eye clean. Let me know what you think of this diamond I am no expert. EGL classification has been used. Thanks to all who reply.

 

1st

1.5 c

7.32-7.26 x 4.32 mm

width 63%

depth 59.3%

crown 12%

pavillion 41%

thickness very thick faceted

polish good to very good

symmetry good to very good

cutlet none

clarity SI1

color F

flouresence none

No comments on the cut grade

 

I try not to be overtly critical, but there are some red flags here:

 

At 1.5 cts a well-proportioned diamond will spread appx 7.40 mm (w 61.0% depth and a 1% girdle). This one is spreading only 7.29 mm with 59.3% depth, meaning the girdle is very thick - so there is a lot of weight hidden there.

 

The crown & pavilion angle relationship are even more of a concern. A 41% pavilion depth implies a 39.4 degree pavilion angle and a 12% crown with the 63% table, depth & girdle thickness indicated means a crown angle near 33.0 degrees. Every diamond must be seen to be appreciated of course, but those proportions are far outside the "sweet spots" of any recognized cut grading system. Diamonds near these proportions which I have seen in-person are dark in the center, without much life.

 

It all depends on what's important to you: It's F (EGL) and 1.5 carats, but in terms of cut quality this is not a diamond we would ever recommend by the numbers. Does the seller actually have the diamond in hand - and have they discussed it with you?

Edited by JohnQuixote
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John thanks for the quick response this is exactly the kind of info I needed! One more question. The cut grades that are listed in certificates such as Tolkowsky, ideal, and premium are these to be trusted in the sense that the highest grade will always be a great looking diamond or is this simply a mathematical designation?

Thank you for your help.

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CRAD,

 

 

The stone is mediocre...with appropriate certification, given its specs. and proportions.

 

I also never cease to get nervous from those "good to very good" designations given by EGL.

This is obviously done to favor the retailers who get all the leverage and flexibility in the world to charge a "very good" price :)

 

There should never be any ambiguity with these designations.

The diamond either exhibits "good" polish/symmetry, or "very good", not something in-betweeen.

 

Would you pay a premium for an F color SI1 that might also be a "H color SI3"??

 

 

What is it, an F or a G?

Good or Very Good?

 

 

Making a purchase of this magnitude is not a guessing game.

 

Certainly, the job of the grading laboratory is not to confuse the consumer, please the retailer, and blur the lines with respect to crucial specs. affecting price/market value.

 

 

I suggest you pass for more reasons than one.

Edited by DiamondMaven
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John thanks for the quick response this is exactly the kind of info I needed! One more question. The cut grades that are listed in certificates such as Tolkowsky, ideal, and premium are these to be trusted in the sense that the highest grade will always be a great looking diamond or is this simply a mathematical designation?

Thank you for your help.

 

You're welcome - it's why we're here. There is meat and potatoes in the work done by Tolkowsky and his contemporaries. The "Tolkowsky ideal" is a set of proportions that’s centered in one "sweet area" of light return �#8220; it’s not the only one. The AGSL grading system 1996-2005 was based soley on Tolkowsky, so "ideal" became a popular term (now abused by some sellers and labs).

 

The AGSL cut grade “ideal†is arguably the industry standard. It is as strict as ever but now allows high performing makes with larger tables and different combos than the near-Tolk stones it used to reward exclusively. The GIA cut grade of excellent overlaps the AGS ideal range but strays too far into steep/deep territory for our liking. No other major lab has a cut grade that is nearly as discriminating, and you likely know they are softer on color and clarity.

 

Cut is by far the most important aspect; I suggest you work with a dealer who specializes in cut, has the diamonds on-hand (many sellers are drop-shippers), works only with GIA/AGS reports and backs your thousands-of-dollars-purchase up with generous benefits such as lifetime trade-up or a similar option.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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