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Need Help With Diamond Color


pamiewamie
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Hello

I am needing help again. Can someone please tell me the noticeable difference between like and I color diamond and a K?

I have found a large diamond (2.00 carat marquise) with clarity of SI (1). However the color is on the lower scale of (K). I have a smaller (1 carat) marquise right now that is same clarity as above but the color is I/J. It is very pretty..not yellow at all. I am just wanting to upgrade to this larger diamond and wondered what your opinions are on a K color diamond. The BIG SIZE of 2 carat solitaire is catching my attention lol. Thanks in advance for your help...

 

Pam

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In general larger stones in the J-K category tend to display more 'color' than smaller diamonds but essentially it all comes down to the Cut Quality of the diamond...the better the Cut the more light will be refracted up through the the top of the diamond to your eye and the "whiter" the diamond will appear to you.

 

Look at this 2 ct marquise and see how it faces up next to your 1 carat and also next to other comparably sized diamonds.

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Hello

I am needing help again. Can someone please tell me the noticeable difference between like and I color diamond and a K?

I have found a large diamond (2.00 carat marquise) with clarity of SI (1). However the color is on the lower scale of (K). I have a smaller (1 carat) marquise right now that is same clarity as above but the color is I/J. It is very pretty..not yellow at all. I am just wanting to upgrade to this larger diamond and wondered what your opinions are on a K color diamond. The BIG SIZE of 2 carat solitaire is catching my attention lol. Thanks in advance for your help...

 

Pam

 

Hi Pam,

The first thing i ask when someone says "I have a J colored Diamond" is "Who called it a J?"

 

If it's a diamond graded by the GIA at least we have some idea what it might be.

 

In many cases a seller describing a diamond as I/J in a one carat size is actually showing a darker diamond- one carat is not considered a small size.

Put a J next to a D and it does look very tinted. But if the diamond shows a lot of tint without comparing it to any other diamonds, it is likely darker than a J or K.

 

As barry says, cut plays a big role in how the color looks.

203a.JPG

the above diamond was graded K by GIA

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Pam,

 

I would suggest that you try to see the diamond in person (and away from the high intensity bulbs), if you can.

 

 

If not, the 2nd best choice is to try and get an actual photo under (discriminating) diffuse lighting and not under the glare of overhead halogen lamps, which makes everything sparkle and shine and is actually the oldest trick in the book for affecting/effecting "sparkle" in a diamond.

 

The halogen bulbs will not work for your purposes, since it does not afford a true indication of a diamonds intrinsic color grade and face-up appearance.

 

Think about it; a diamond's color, talks about the presence or absence of coloration/tint in a white diamond.

The lower the color grade, the more of a visible yellowish/brownish tint there will be.

 

To this end, the high intesity bulbs will play light off the diamond in such a way so as to mask your actual ability to discern this important data.

 

Instead, it often "helps" with the perception of a brilliant and scintillating diamond, where the diamond in actuality and under normal viewing/lighting conditions, may very well be a complete dud.

 

The idea is; a diamond which has been cut for maximum brilliancy, will generate its own light/brilliancy and does not need to lean on artificial means (direct overhead lighting from high intesity bulbs) in order to "show brilliancy".

 

While a well cut diamond will assuredly explode under direct sunlight (as well as under a halogen lamp), it should also sparkle in any lighting environment.

 

 

Specifically for your purposes, you will never get a true indication of a diamonds face-up color appearance, unless you look at the stone under flat and diffuse white light, without any 'artificial' influences, of which Halogen bulbs certainly qualify.

 

 

This is how Gemologists and Diamond Graders ascertain color (by wiewing the diamond on a flat white surface) and therefore how you should too.

 

 

They say that "the eyes have it" and these are probably the two best ways to get your @@ on the stone!

 

 

 

Best of luck!

Edited by DiamondMaven
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Pam,

 

If not, the 2nd best choice is to try and get an actual photo under (discriminating) diffuse lighting and not under the glare of overhead halogen lamps, which makes everything sparkle and shine and is actually the oldest trick in the book for affecting/effecting "sparkle" in a diamond.

 

The halogen bulbs will not work for your purposes, since it does not afford a true indication of a diamonds intrinsic color grade and face-up appearance.

 

Think about it; a diamond's color, talks about the presence or absence of coloration/tint in a white diamond.

The lower the color grade, the more of a visible yellowish/brownish tint there will be.

 

To this end, the high intesity bulbs will play light off the diamond in such a way so as to mask your actual ability to discern this important data.

 

 

 

Best of luck!

 

Hu Judah,

Again, I ask you to clarify- are you referring to my photo(s)

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Well, you posted this right below my post, containing my photo

get an actual photo under (discriminating) diffuse lighting and not under the glare of overhead halogen lamps, which makes everything sparkle and shine and is actually the oldest trick in the book for affecting/effecting "sparkle" in a diamond.

 

 

Just wanted to be crystal clear you are not referring to any of my photos.

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??Huh??

 

Whatever are you talking about???

 

There was a bunch of other stuff you left out of your "quote" of my posting.

I was offering clear, cogent, and pertinent advice to Pam and in direct response to her queries.

 

I am not sure why you seem to be undertaking a prosecutorial tone with your postings, but I hope I don't need to vet all of my responses and comments with you.

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Judah, At this moment, I request that you be super clear.

If it even sounds like you're referring to me, or my company, please know that after being accused of a lot of false and libelous charges- I am HYPER sensative.

If someone equated you to a Nazi, then you would understand my anger. I truly hope that it never happens to you, or anyone else.

 

 

 

SO- to clarify- I'm asking you to confirm that your statement about "the oldest trick on the book" has NOTHING TO DO WITH ME OR MY PHOTOS OR COMPANY.

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??Huh??

 

Whatever are you talking about???

 

There was a bunch of other stuff you left out of your "quote" of my posting.

I was offering clear, cogent, and pertinent advice to Pam and in direct response to her queries.

 

I am not sure why you seem to be undertaking a prosecutorial tone with your postings, but I hope I don't need to vet all of my responses and comments with you.

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