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Couple Of Rings To Chose From...whatcha Think


limunious
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ok let me run through a couple rocks and let me know what ya think.

 

1st one and i think might be the best. all are princess cut

 

OPTION 1

GIA:

1.52 carat

depth 76%

table 66%

girdle: medium to very thick

culet: none

polish excellent

symetry good

clarity vvs2

color g

flourescence: 0

 

PRICE... 9995

 

OPTION 2

EGL europe

2.02 carat

depth 75.7

table width 75

crown height 6

pavillion depth 66%

girdle thin,polished

polish good to very good

symmetry very good

culet none

clarity vs2

color h

floursence none

PRICE.. 12500

 

OPTION 3

GIA

1.72 carat

depth 74.8

table 72

color h

clarity vs1

polish very good

symmetry good

PRICE.. 12900

 

OPTION 4

GIA

1.72 carat

depth 70.1

table 75

color G

clarity si1

Price 12200

 

Option 5

GIA

1.69 carat

depth 73.5

teble 81

girdle extremely thin to extremely thick

culet none

polish very good

symmetry good

clarity vs2

color grade g

flouyrescent 2

PRICE 10200

 

If you guys could grade these for me in order of best to worst it would be great and let me know how the prices sound also. Would be much appreciated

 

Thanks

 

Phil

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also my budget is 10k - 13k for the diuamond. It has to be a princess cut. so if you guys have any recommendations as to what to look for.. color clarity cut tables, the whole package it would be great. Im not hung up on anything at all, i just wanna get the best overall ring for her i can. Doesnt have to bne a d, ideal cut, perfect tables or anything. Just what do u guys think is a good combo for a great looking and brilliant princess cut stone?

Phil

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I can’t say much of anything about the cutting and which are likely to be the most beautiful stones but I do have a few observations.

 

#1 G/VVS2 is a premium combination in Asia which drives up the prices on this particular combination. If you’re not specifically targeting it, I wouldn’t recommend paying the extra price to get it.

#2. EGL International.

#3 Looks promising but I wonder about what caused the 'good' symmetry

#4 Looks promising but you have even less information about it than the others.

#4 Extremely thin girdle on a princess cut is usually a mistake.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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yes the money is in us dollars and im getting the prices from philadelphia's jewelers row. Its amazing how nice of a price you can get when you pit one retailer vs another that is right across the street. These are sale prices after long negotiations!

 

so the opinion is the stone for the 12900 #3 seems to be the best? I thought number 1 would be the best because of the tables and depth % seemed to be dead on, and the price for the color and clarity seemed to be nice. But then again im not a diamond expert im an auto expert!

 

also what would u recommend for stats that i should look for when i go out? im planning on shopping again on thursday and obviously my budget is around 10-13k, what would u recommend for the 4c's and also for the table, depth.... alot of the rings ive been seeing have an 81% table and i was told to steer clear of those for the princess cut because it wont reflect the light well.

 

phil

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Phil,

 

Table and depth % are not especially useful in evaluating princess cuts so I’m not sure what you mean by #1 being your expected winner by being ‘dead on’. Could you please explain? Dead on what?

 

Have you seen any of these stones? Any opinions based on what they look like? You're missing a huge amount of information here. This is like shopping for a car based purely on color and tire size.

 

Neil

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Hey Niel

 

I was told by the jeweler by me here in philadelphia at rosen jewelers that the table and depth %'s were extremely important on the purchase of a ring, especially a princess cut one. They said that a princess cut diamond would reflect alot less light than a round stone, so getting the table and depth in the best case scenario %'s should be one of my biggest concerns. Is this not true? Otherwise i can open myself up to a bunch that have table % of 81 and depths of 75. Whats your opinion on that?

 

phil

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Hey Niel

 

I was told by the jeweler by me here in philadelphia at rosen jewelers that the table and depth %'s were extremely important on the purchase of a ring, especially a princess cut one. They said that a princess cut diamond would reflect alot less light than a round stone, so getting the table and depth in the best case scenario %'s should be one of my biggest concerns. Is this not true? Otherwise i can open myself up to a bunch that have table % of 81 and depths of 75. Whats your opinion on that?

 

phil

 

I do not agree with this. Light performance of princess cuts is definitely not as good as it is for round and there’s a huge difference between a well cut stone and a poorly cut one but table% and depth% are not a credible way to judge the difference. Princesses are mathematically considerably more complicated than rounds. The most important variables are the crown angle, the two pavilion angles and the perimeter shape, none of which you provided. Try to get someone to show you an AGS0 princess to compare the cutting with and you’ll see the difference right away. Don't forget to actually look at the stones. This is the biggest advantage you have for shopping at a local store, use it.

 

Neil

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yes the money is in us dollars and im getting the prices from philadelphia's jewelers row. Its amazing how nice of a price you can get when you pit one retailer vs another that is right across the street. These are sale prices after long negotiations!

 

so the opinion is the stone for the 12900 #3 seems to be the best? I thought number 1 would be the best because of the tables and depth % seemed to be dead on, and the price for the color and clarity seemed to be nice. But then again im not a diamond expert im an auto expert!

 

also what would u recommend for stats that i should look for when i go out? im planning on shopping again on thursday and obviously my budget is around 10-13k, what would u recommend for the 4c's and also for the table, depth.... alot of the rings ive been seeing have an 81% table and i was told to steer clear of those for the princess cut because it wont reflect the light well.

 

phil

even in term of US$ and the price is quite cheap already. i wonder why my country is selling diamonds so expensively. :D

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how do we know whether the diamond is a well-cut a not? does it have a standard % for the table and depth?? :D

 

It’s rather like asking how you know if a painting is any good. The first thing to do is to look at it. For many people, this is all that’s required. If you want a more scientific approach and you want to know how your chosen diamond compares to others in some objective fashion, you really only have two choices. Turn yourself into an expert, invest in the tools and look at enough diamonds to develop the required experience, or you can rely on the opinions of others who have done these things.

 

For most people, reliance on the experts is necessary and so the next question becomes how to choose one. Lots of people claim to know what they are doing and have conflicting opinions about what is important and what isn’t and the prices range from free to many hundreds of dollars. The first place to start is with the dealer. Straightforward and informed advice and the ability to communicate well with you is the #1 thing the dealer is adding to the deal and, if they aren’t doing it, you should shop elsewhere. The lab report is a supplement for the good council being provided by your dealer, not a substitute for it. If all the dealer can provide you is a scan of a lab report for a stone that they’ve never seen, I strongly recommend either choosing another dealer or hiring your own expert to evaluate the stone. This brings in the independent appraisers (note: this is much of what I do for a living). The IA is a hired expert who is working for you, not the jeweler, and they are working to insure your best interests in the shopping process.

 

In EVERY case, don’t forget the important step of looking at it. Not everyone’s ideas of beauty are the same and it’s part of the magic of diamonds (and paintings) that some will sing to you more than others. If you’re buying in an environment like the Internet where you can’t look at the stone, it’s absolutely essential that you have a return period wherein you can look at the stone in a variety of lighting conditions and personally decide if it’s the right one for you. If it’s not, return it and try again.

 

No, there's not a standard depth and table% that will assure that you are buying the correct stone or that a particular stone will compare well with others that are similar.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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It’s rather like asking how you know if a painting is any good. The first thing to do is to look at it. For many people, this is all that’s required. If you want a more scientific approach and you want to know how your chosen diamond compares to others in some objective fashion, you really only have two choices. Turn yourself into an expert, invest in the tools and look at enough diamonds to develop the required experience, or you can rely on the opinions of others who have done these things.

 

For most people, reliance on the experts is necessary and so the next question becomes how to choose one. Lots of people claim to know what they are doing and have conflicting opinions about what is important and what isn’t and the prices range from free to many hundreds of dollars. The first place to start is with the dealer. Straightforward and informed advice and the ability to communicate well with you is the #1 thing the dealer is adding to the deal and, if they aren’t doing it, you should shop elsewhere. The lab report is a supplement for the good council being provided by your dealer, not a substitute for it. If all the dealer can provide you is a scan of a lab report for a stone that they’ve never seen, I strongly recommend either choosing another dealer or hiring your own expert to evaluate the stone. This brings in the independent appraisers (note: this is much of what I do for a living). The IA is a hired expert who is working for you, not the jeweler, and they are working to insure your best interests in the shopping process.

 

In EVERY case, don’t forget the important step of looking at it. Not everyone’s ideas of beauty are the same and it’s part of the magic of diamonds (and paintings) that some will sing to you more than others. If you’re buying in an environment like the Internet where you can’t look at the stone, it’s absolutely essential that you have a return period wherein you can look at the stone in a variety of lighting conditions and personally decide if it’s the right one for you. If it’s not, return it and try again.

 

No, there's not a standard depth and table% that will assure that you are buying the correct stone or that a particular stone will compare well with others that are similar.

 

Neil

so to conclude, a well-cut diamond is one that'll blink and of course with a recognise diamond cert! yeh?! :D

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