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Is It Good Or Bad?


Mesteka
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Not enough information to say anything:

 

Please provide the following:

 

1. Diamond Grading Lab

2. Shape

3. Measurements and specs.

4. Cut Analysis

5. Photos, especially if this is a Fancy Shape.

6. Additional data such as light performance if available.

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Hi, i need to know whether the following qualification is good or bad?

 

Color : H

Clarity: VVS2

Proportion: Very good

Finish Grade:Very good

Flourescence: Slight

awaiting your reply

thanks

 

The color is good and clarity is excellent, a very good finish is very good to. We need more information on the cut, that's the most important.

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The color is good and clarity is excellent, a very good finish is very good to. We need more information on the cut, that's the most important.

 

I disagree until we know which lab did the grading. H color is very near-colorless by GIA standards (if this is what the buyer seeks), but H from a lesser lab may not be; especially depending on shape, size and cut quality. Same with finish grades. AGS and GIA don't use 'slight' in their nomenclature for fluorescence so it seems to be from another lab...

 

You may be right Moshe, but until we know it's not Joe's Crab Shack that did the grading I'll reserve judgment. B)

Edited by JohnQuixote
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btw, is a G color and internally flawless diamond good? graded by GIA. B)

 

In terms of color and clarity, sure. G is very white; closest to colorless without the high F premium. IF is crazy-clean clarity...some might say clarity-overkill if you're looking to maximize other qualities for your budget. How big is it - and is it the size you want?

 

Beyond the above, CUT is the most important aspect in any diamond. A well-cut stone can put on a fireworks show to dazzle your neighbors from afar...while a poorly cut diamond (even D IF) can be dead as a doornail.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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  1. Diamond Grading Lab: HRD
  2. Shape: Brilliant
  3. Measurments: 7.26-7031 mm x 4.44 mm
  4. Girdle: Thin 2.5 faceted
  5. Culet: Ponited
  6. Table width: 61%
  7. cr height: 14.0%
  8. pav.depth 44.5%

Thanks, awaiting your reply.

 

Not enough information to say anything:

 

Please provide the following:

 

1. Diamond Grading Lab

2. Shape

3. Measurements and specs.

4. Cut Analysis

5. Photos, especially if this is a Fancy Shape.

6. Additional data such as light performance if available.

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Share on other sites

  1. Diamond Grading Lab: HRD
  2. Shape: Brilliant
  3. Measurments: 7.26-7031 mm x 4.44 mm
  4. Girdle: Thin 2.5 faceted
  5. Culet: Ponited
  6. Table width: 61%
  7. cr height: 14.0%
  8. pav.depth 44.5%

Thanks, awaiting your reply.

 

HRD is a reputable lab. Color, clarity and finish should be in-line with GIA standards.

 

Assuming the mm are 7.26-7.31 (typo?) x 4.44, this is a 60/60 make (table & depth both near 60%). If it's well-cut it will have a big look with more brightness than fire in its balance of performance. The near-Tolkowsky rounds commonly sold via internet have slightly smaller tables and higher crowns for an even balance of brightness and fire; but among well-cut diamonds such differences in make can be matters of taste, not overall appeal.

 

Bear in mind that my comments are generalizations: There are many other factors like minor facets, brillianteering, variations in angles, etc., that can influence the diamond's look one way or another. It would be nice to have some kind of concrete cut analysis, reflector images or other indicators of light performance. Without them we're limited to broad predictions.

Edited by JohnQuixote
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In terms of color and clarity, sure. G is very white; closest to colorless without the high F premium. IF is crazy-clean clarity...some might say clarity-overkill if you're looking to maximize other qualities for your budget. How big is it - and is it the size you want?

 

Beyond the above, CUT is the most important aspect in any diamond. A well-cut stone can put on a fireworks show to dazzle your neighbors from afar...while a poorly cut diamond (even D IF) can be dead as a doornail.

this diamond is about 1.15 cts or slightly a little bit more.

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What constitutes good and bad in a diamond, rather like the whole concept of beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder. Whiter diamonds and those with less interesting inclusions cost more but I think it’s a mistake to therefore define them as better. It’s terribly important to understand the objectives before a statement like that can be applied in any meaningful way.

 

Diamonds are generally priced by dealers based on a 4 dimensional grid using size/shape/color/clarity with modifiers applied for cutting (either a premium or a discount) and value added services (like location, dealer support, warranties, branding etc.). Most diamond shoppers are appalled at the prices being asked and the objective becomes to get a diamond that would be the most expensive they can arrange at the lowest price they can negotiate rather than finding the one that they find to be the most beautiful. An average cut F/VS1 1.00ct. in a premium store is likely to be priced higher than a spectacularly cut I/SI2 1.40ct. found in a discount environment but which of those is better will depend on what you want. Most people would describe the later as better based on a casual observation but this doesn't make it more beautiful, only more popular and it certainly doesn't make the F/VS customer wrong in theri selection.

 

An F/VS2 with paperwork from a lab that calls it a E/VS1 is likely to cost more than it would without those papers, but does that make it better? For some shoppers it does, for others it doesn’t.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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What constitutes good and bad in a diamond, rather like the whole concept of beauty, is in the eyes of the beholder. Whiter diamonds and those with less interesting inclusions cost more but I think it’s a mistake to therefore define them as better. It’s terribly important to understand the objectives before a statement like that can be applied in any meaningful way.

 

Diamonds are generally priced by dealers based on a 4 dimensional grid using size/shape/color/clarity with modifiers applied for cutting (either a premium or a discount) and value added services (like location, dealer support, warranties, branding etc.). Most diamond shoppers are appalled at the prices being asked and the objective becomes to get a diamond that would be the most expensive they can arrange at the lowest price they can negotiate rather than finding the one that they find to be the most beautiful. An average cut F/VS1 1.00ct. in a premium store is likely to be priced higher than a spectacularly cut I/SI2 1.40ct. found in a discount environment but which of those is better will depend on what you want. Most people would describe the later as better based on a casual observation but this doesn't make it more beautiful, only more popular and it certainly doesn't make the F/VS customer wrong in theri selection.

 

An F/VS2 with paperwork from a lab that calls it a E/VS1 is likely to cost more than it would without those papers, but does that make it better? For some shoppers it does, for others it doesn’t.

 

Neil

therefore, eventually it's an individaul preference matter. some people go for good quality diamonds whereas some people go for average and budget diamonds. after all, it depends on the shoppers themselves! :)

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