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Mine Cut Diamonds


pamiewamie
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Can someone tell me what a "mine cut" diamond is. I have came across a 2.86 carat diamond cluster ring. Its dated back to the early 1920's. The diamonds are mine cut and im not really sure what that means. It like 7 stones to make up the round cluster and then on diamond on each side of the band. I would appreciate any information. Thanks

Edited by pamiewamie
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Facet design has been an evolutionary process. Back in the 1600’s, fashioning of diamonds was a matter of polishing a few faces on it and calling it done. Over time, cutters learned that that certain looks seemed to do better than others. For example, diamonds have primarily been fashioned with a table facet in the top center for several hundred years (there are exceptions both then and now). Round and roundish cut stones cut in the period from about 1700-1850 have a table, a crown and a pavilion and all of the other facets that modern shoppers are accustomed to seeing. They generally have large culets, tall crowns and small tables when compared to more modern stones and tend to be more of a squarish or cushion shape. As the technology available to cutters improved, the design changed slightly and became the Old European in the mid 1800’s. This evolved again in the early 20th century with tools and techniques that allowed them to more specifically cut for optical performance and the Round Brilliant came into popularity.

 

Interestingly, despite the name, none of this really defines the age of a stone. Modern cutters can and occasionally do cut Old Mine, Old European, Rose and other designs that are associated with antique jewelry. Round brilliants simply sell better for most merchants and cutters like to make things that sell.

 

Neil

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Facet design has been an evolutionary process. Back in the 1600’s, fashioning of diamonds was a matter of polishing a few faces on it and calling it done. Over time, cutters learned that that certain looks seemed to do better than others. For example, diamonds have primarily been fashioned with a table facet in the top center for several hundred years (there are exceptions both then and now). Round and roundish cut stones cut in the period from about 1700-1850 have a table, a crown and a pavilion and all of the other facets that modern shoppers are accustomed to seeing. They generally have large culets, tall crowns and small tables when compared to more modern stones and tend to be more of a squarish or cushion shape. As the technology available to cutters improved, the design changed slightly and became the Old European in the mid 1800’s. This evolved again in the early 20th century with tools and techniques that allowed them to more specifically cut for optical performance and the Round Brilliant came into popularity.

 

Interestingly, despite the name, none of this really defines the age of a stone. Modern cutters can and occasionally do cut Old Mine, Old European, Rose and other designs that are associated with antique jewelry. Round brilliants simply sell better for most merchants and cutters like to make things that sell.

 

Neil

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Facet design has been an evolutionary process. Back in the 1600’s, fashioning of diamonds was a matter of polishing a few faces on it and calling it done. Over time, cutters learned that that certain looks seemed to do better than others. For example, diamonds have primarily been fashioned with a table facet in the top center for several hundred years (there are exceptions both then and now). Round and roundish cut stones cut in the period from about 1700-1850 have a table, a crown and a pavilion and all of the other facets that modern shoppers are accustomed to seeing. They generally have large culets, tall crowns and small tables when compared to more modern stones and tend to be more of a squarish or cushion shape. As the technology available to cutters improved, the design changed slightly and became the Old European in the mid 1800’s. This evolved again in the early 20th century with tools and techniques that allowed them to more specifically cut for optical performance and the Round Brilliant came into popularity.

 

Interestingly, despite the name, none of this really defines the age of a stone. Modern cutters can and occasionally do cut Old Mine, Old European, Rose and other designs that are associated with antique jewelry. Round brilliants simply sell better for most merchants and cutters like to make things that sell.

 

Neil

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Thanks Neil.

This mine cut ring that is dated in the 1920's has a diamond weight of 2.86 carats. There is one diamond that does have an inclusion that is through the surface. The round cluster has 7 stones to make up about 2.70 carats and then one smaller stone on each side of the band.

Not sure of the color and clarity but all other stones are listed as being good other than the one stone with the inclusion to to top. I can buy the ring for 900.00. DO you feel this would be a fair price? I would appreciate you opinion. Thanks Pam

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For the most part, old miners weren't being cut very much in the 1920's but there are, of course, exceptions to every rule and the jeweler may have been making a piece out of previously cut stones. Diamonds recycle pretty well and people have been doing if for a long time. Pretty much every diamond ever mined is still in circulation other than a few residing at the bottom of the ocean or buried in the landfill. Even these may come back someday. :)

 

I don't give value opinions on things without seeing them because there are far too many variables and it would be irresponsible for me as an appraiser to give this sort of advice but there may be others here who will comment on the pricing.

 

Neil

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