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Buying Diamonds & Jewelry On Ebay: Shoppers Beware!


barry
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Ebay scammers are targeting Ebay with 'phishing' and re-directing to fraudulent websites.

 

Be careful.

 

More information here:

 

http://www.redherring.com/Article.aspx?a=2...Answers+on+eBay

 

 

This problem goes back a few years, ebay is really taking this serious this year. One of the things they did to prevent this problem was to hide all the bidders information that way no one knows who they are so they can't email them. It will take along time for ebay to find the solution to fix this problem for good.

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There are quite a few variations on this problem. The crooks are very creative. If you receive an email from ebay, paypal, your bank, some trusted vendor, a government agency or anyone else where they want you to click on a link in the email and then fill out a form on the resultant page and this email didn’t arrive as a direct result of something that YOU did, like place an order, attempt to change your phone number, etc., BEWARE.

 

If you think you are being phished, contact the real site by typing their URL directly into the line at the top of your web browser, not by clicking on another link in either the suspect email or on the fill-in-form page. Go to the contact page and ring them up or email them with your concerns.

 

It’s also worth noting that the habit of using the same password on lots and lots of sites because it’s easy to remember can get you into trouble. The bad guys can set up a site offering some harmless service like an e-greeting card site or game that requires you to register and then they will try the same password on other sites that are more sensitive, like ebay or your bank. It’s amazing how often this works and someone will pass out the key to their bank account without even realizing it.

 

Neil

Edited by denverappraiser
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While we are on this topic, how many times do you receive orders with someone’s credit card information and the shipping address is to Singapore or some other country. This is happening more often in the recent month. Every time I get such orders I call the person in the billing information and let them know that the personal information was stolen, so they at least know to watch out and contact there c.c companies and banks.

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It’s also worth noting that the habit of using the same password on lots and lots of sites because it’s easy to remember can get you into trouble. The bad guys can set up a site offering some harmless service like an e-greeting card site or game that requires you to register and then they will try the same password on other sites that are more sensitive, like ebay or your bank.

 

Responsible websites such as Diamond.Info store passwords in a one-way encrypted hash. This is a technique used since the early days of computing that takes a plaintext password and converts it into a long string of hexadecimal digits and then stored. Likewise, when someone is trying to log in, we convert the password they submit to the long string of hex digits and compare to what we have stored. The catch is the hexadecimal digits CANNOT be converted back to the original password! So, if someone were to hack into Diamond.info and steal this information, it would be totally useless to them.

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Hermann,

 

There is a growing number of sites that request registration information where the user has no clue whatever about who is behind the scenes or how they handle the information given to them. Many are responsible businesses but some are not. As a user it's wickedly difficult to tell the difference, especially if it's the sort of site that you're not likely to visit again, the registration is being done simply out of habit without any real consideration to what is going on and the entire relationship with the site lasts a few minutes before it's forgotten. As I said, the bad guys are pretty clever.

 

Neil

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It's P&P: phishing and pharming.

 

The fob key is a very good idea but charging $5 for it? Gimmee a break. They should make it free to all ebay registered users.

 

As the article indicates ebay will have to be much more aggressive.

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